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Full text of "Athlete, The"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/athletethe195859unse 



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Hiqh khool Anikf9 



MAYSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL TEAM 
K. H. S. A. A. CHAMPION - 1958 




(Left to Right) Front Row: U. Greene, K. Smith, Reetz, Allison, 
Knox, Hayslip. Second Row: Mgr. Tolle, R. Hutchison, Alexander, P. 
Hutchison, A. Smith, Coach Crum. Third Row: Murphy, D. Greene, Paris, 
Fetters. 



Omcial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
AUGUST - 1358 I 




Kentucky High School Track Meet 

Lexington, Kentucky, May 16-17, 1958 
Central High School Track Team—K. H. S. A. A. Champion— 1958 




(Left to Right) Front Ro'v: R. Williams, Spencer, Shontee, Co-Capt. Smith, Helm. Second Row: 
Coach Whedbee, Mgr. Robinson, Gazaway, Hillman, McMurray, Capt. Taylor. Walker, Mgr. Evans, 
Ass't Coach Anderson. Third Row: W. Williams, Glass, Tytus, Meriweather, O'Bannon. 



120 Yard Hurdles— 

1. Vaughn— M.M.I. 

2. Hammond — Bardstown 

3. Jordan — Male 

4. Hudson — Franklin-Simpson 

5. Travis — ^Caldwell County 

Time 15:5 
100 Yard Dash— 

1. Smith — Louisville Central 

2. Shontee — Louisville Cent. 

3. Sprous — Highlands 

4. McGee — Hopkinsville 

5. Smith — Lexington Dunbar 

Time: 10.1 

Mile Run — 

1. Cleaver — Bourbon Co. 

2. Baxter — Lafayette 

3. Simpson — Eastern 

4. Manasco — Crofton 

5. Purdy — Tilghman 

Time: 4:31.5 
(New Record) 
880 Yard Relay— 

1. Louisville Central 

2. Tilghman 

3. Elizabethtown 

4. Valley 

5. Hopkinsville 

Time: 1:32.9 



440 Yard Dash— 

1. Taylor — Lou. Central 

2. Hocker — Tilghman 

3. Schwartz — Atherton 

4. Seilacher — Highlands 

5. Cottrell — Eastern 

Time: 50.4 
(New Recoi'd) 
180 Yard Hurdles— 

1. Vaughn — M.M.I. 

2. Hammond — Bardstown 

3. Smith— Tilghman 

4. Hudson — Franklin-Simpson 
5: Sutherland — Eastern 

Time: 20.4 
880 Yard Run— 

1. Cleaver — ^Bourbon Co. 

2. Simpson — Eastern 

3. Boggs — Elizabethtown 

4. Spencer — Lou. Central 

5. Purdy — Tilghman 

Time: 2:00.4 
(New Record) 
220 Yard Dash— 

1. Smith — Lou. Central 

2. Shontee — Lou. Central 

3. Aubrey — Valley 

4. Sprous — Highlands 

5. Clark — Dunham 

Time: 22.0 



Mile Relay — 

1. Lou. Central 

2. Tilghman 

3. Elizabethtown 

4. Ashland 

5. Lafayette 

Time: 3:33.4 
Shot Put— 

1. Rice — ^St. Xavier 

2. Moraja — St. Josephs 

3. Cochran — Highlands 

4. Hayden — St. Josephs 

5. Bell — Eastern 

Distance : 50' 5 % " 
Pole Vault— 

1. McAtee — Highlands 

2. Lienesch — St. Josephs 

3. Denham — Boone Co. 
3. Jennings — Holmes 

5. Burgess — Tilghman 
5. Harden — Newport 

Height: 11' 10%" 
(Tied Record) 
Discus — 

1. Clark— Tilghman 

2. Stuedle— Trinity 

3. Smith — Henderson City 

4. Bryan — Male 

5. Hayden — St. Josephs 

Distance: 145' 5" 

(Continued on Page Twenty) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOLUME XXI— NO. 1 



AUGUST, 1958 



$1.00 Per Year 



Report of Audit 

Louisville, Kentucky, July 14, lO.'iS 
Mr. Theodore A. Sanford, Secretary & Treasurer 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
Lexington, Kentucky 
Dear Sir: 

Pursuant to instructions received, we have made an audit 
of the books and records of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION for the period of one year be- 
ginning July 1, 1957, and ending June 30, 1958. In addition, 
we have prepared and attached hereto, statements of the Re- 
ceipts and Disbursements, which, in our opinion, reflect the 
true financial condition of the Association as of June 30, 1958. 

The Cash Funds on Hand and U. S. Savings Bonds Accounts 
were found to be correct and verified by letter from your de- 

We find the records presented to us for the purpose of audit 
to be in agreement and in good condition. 

Respectfully submitted, 
JOHNSON-FOWLER & COMPANY 
By Huet L. Johnson 
Certified Public Accountant 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

PERIOD FROM JULY 1, 19.57 TO JUNE 30, 1958 
STATEMENT OF 
RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
RECEIPTS: 

Balance in Checking Account July 1, 1957 $ 6,284.46 

Annual Dues: 462 @ $3.00 $ 1.386.00 

Officials' Dues: 

Football- 350 la $3.00 1,050.00 

Basketball: 1.204 m $3.00 3,012.00 

Reciprocity Officials: 

Football: 24 «/ $1.00 24.00 

Basketball: 20 (./ $1.00 20.00 

Officials' Fines: 15 (./ $5.00 75.00 

Scholos' Fines: 4 (n $5.00 20.00 

Redeposits (Bad checks made good) 36.00 

Advertising in Magazine 800.00 

Sale of Rules Books 93.20 

Sale of U. S. Treas. Certificates 10,060.00 

Ticket Sales - Annual Meeting 180.00 

Interest Received from Government Bonds 1,883.90 
Interest Received from First Federal 

Loan Association 52.50 

Interest Recevied from Union Federal 

Loan Association 105.00 

Transferred from Union Federal Loan 

Association Savings Account 8,000.00 

Transferred from First Federal Savings 

and Loan Association 7,000.00 

Transferred from State Basketball 

Tournament Account 89,351.13 

Refunds 1,299.22 

Receipts - K.H.S.A.A. Double-Header 1,117.50 

Receipts - State Baseball Tournament 563.50 126,728.95 

$133,013.41 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Board of Control Expense $ 3.969.27 

Commissioner's Salary (Base Sal. $10,500) 7,685.74 

Expense - Commissioner's Office 306.90 

Ass't. Commissioner's Salary 

(Base Sal. $7,500) 5,982.42 

Travel Expense - Ass't Commissioner— 726.60 

Clerical Help 4,601.29 

Janitor Service 755.08 

Postage 1,617.69 

Office Supplies 463.57 

Janitor Supplies 89.50 

Purchase of New Equipment 529.27 

Insurance 73.14 

Equipment Repairs & Service Contracts, 374.13 

Building Repairs 23.45 

Finishing Basement Rooms - 

K.H.S.A.A. Building 1,507.38 

Utilities 805.95 



Telephone and Telegraph 927.15 

Fidelity Bonds 42.50 

Printing 2,371.02 

Appropriation to Kentucky Coaches 

Charity Ass'n. 250.00 

Purchase of National Federation 

Publications 1,344.08 

Delegates to National Federation 

Meetings 5.156.31 

National Federation Dues 116.35 

Girls Division — N.S.G.W.S. 300.00 

Rental on Films 307.00 

Audit 50.00 

Bad Checks 44.00 

Meals - Annual Banquet 1,650.00 

Speaker - Annual Banquet 50.00 

Taxes: 

Federal Income Tax Withhcld-$ 3,331.70 

Social Security 678.50 

City Income Tax Withheld-, 370.31 
Stat" Income Tax Withheld., 603.06 
Hospitalization Withheld 232.40 5,215.97 

Transfer of Funds: 

To Savings Accounts 15,000.00 

To K.H.S.A..4. Protection 

Fund 12,000.00 27,000.00 

Magazine: 

Printing and Engraving 3,758.90 

Mailing 75.00 3.833.90 

Officials' Division: 

Honorariums and Expenses - 

Clinics $ 1.103.66 

Printinc and Miscellaneous 

Expense 82.77 

School for Basketball Officials 1,029.54 
Expense - Regional Basketball 

Clinics 161.20 2,377.17 

State Committee Expense 275.69 

Trophies and Medals 

(State Meet) 433.22 

Officials (State Meet) 220.70 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Meet) 1,751.95 2,681.56 

Golf: 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Tournament). 897.45 

Trophies and Awards 633.36 

Miscellaneous Expenses 71.50 1,602.32 

Tennis: 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Tournament) 188.75 

Trophies and Balls 1,004.66 

Miscellaneous Expenses 31.10 1,224.51 

Track: 

Regional Expense 315.29 

Trophies and Medals 1.554.79 

State Committee Expense 427.53 

Officials 502.90 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Meet) 6,273.30 

Miscellaneous Expenses 

(State Meet) 36.00 

New Equipment 48.37 

State Clinic 45.00 9,203.18 

Baseball : 

Refund on District Tourna- 
ment Deficits 3,278.71 

Trophies and Awards 1,320.36 

Refunds on Regional Tourna- 
ment Deficits 581.68 

Baseballs (State Tourna- 
ment) 84.96 

Transportation (State Tourna- 
ment) 552.95 

(ContinuecJ on Page Three) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1958 



AUGUST, 1958 VOL. XXI— NO. 1 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 
President Russell Williamson (1956-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield 11957-611, Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones, 11957-611 Somerset: W. H. Crowdus 
(1958-62) Franklin: Jack Dawson (1958-62), Louisville: Robert 
P. Forsythe (1955-69), Greenville: K. G. Gillaspie (1956-59), 
Georgetown: Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan, 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



rrom 



the C< 



ommissionei s 



Offi 



ice 



Football Clinics 

The 1958 clinics for football officials will be 
con(iucted by Athletic Director Edgar McNabb who 
is Assistant Principal of the Beech-.vood Hig-h 
School, South Fort Mitchell. Mr. McNabb, a veter- 
an official, has attended meetings of the National 
Federation Football Committee for several years. 
Some of his clinics will have been held by the time 
this issue of the magazine goes to press. The 
oates and sites of the clinics are as follows: August 
10, Ashland Y.M.C.A., 8:00 P.M. (EST); August 11, 
Pikeville High School, 8:00 P.M. (EST) August 12, 
Bell High School, Pineville, 8:00 P.M. (EST); Au- 
gust 17, Bowling Green High School, 3:00 P.M. 
(CST); August 18, Henderson High School, 8:00 
P.M. (CDT); August 19, Mayfield High School, 
8:00 P.M. (CST); August 24, Newport High School, 
8:00 P.M. (EST); August 25, University High 
School, Lexington, 8:00 P.M. (CDT); August 26, 
Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, 8:00 P.M. (CDT). 
Registration of Officials 
Previously registered football and basketball of- 
ficials have received their renewal application cards 
for the 1958-59 school year. Approximately one hun- 
dred officials failed to file their 1957-58 reports on 
or before the deadline set by the Board of Control 
for the submitting of reports, and it was necessary 
to impose a fine on each official who thus failed 
to comply with Association rules. It is an Associa- 
tion requirement that each registered official at- 
tend a clinic in the sport in which he is registered. 
Ten football officials and forty-five basketballl of- 
ficials were suspended in 1957-58 for failure to at- 
tend clinics. 

Protection Fund News 
The Board of Control in its April meeting voted 
a dividend credit out of the State Basketball Tour- 
nament funds in the amount of $30.00 to each school 
insuring its athletes in the K.H.S.A.A. Protection 
Fund for 1958-59. The action of the Board is equiva- 
lent to giving coverage to each K.H.S.A.A. member 
school for thirty players in "Physical Education and 
All Sports except Football." This is the seventh year 
in which a dividend has been declared by the Board. 
The dividend may be applied only as a Protection 
Fund credit. The Protection Fund had its best year 
in 1957-58, as far as sei-vice to member schools 
is concerned. Claims in the amount of $23,063.05 
were paid. By raising the ceiling on "special" claims 
from $150.00 to $500.00, the Association found it 
possible to reimburse the schools more on some of 



the larger claims than it had done in previous 
years. 

Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association met at the Kenlake 
Hotel, Kentucky Lake State Park, on Friday, July 
25, 1958. The meeting was called to order by Presi- 
dent Russelll Williamson at 9:30 A.M., with all 
Board members. Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford 
and Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield present. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that the reading of the minutes of the 
April 11th meeting be waived, since the members 
of the Board had received copies of these minutes. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner made a report to the Board 
on the receipts and disbursements of the K.H.S.A.A. 
and the K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund for the year 
1957-58. He presented copies of the audit, recently 
prepared by the Johnson-Fowler Company of Louis- 
ville. Total funds on hand June 30, 1958, were re- 
ported as being $90,401.35. He stated that a com- 
plete breakdown on receipts and expenses would 
appear in a forthcoming issue of the mag-azine. He 
then presented a proposed K.H.S.A.A. budget for 
the year 1958-59, with estimated receipts of $98,- 
320.00 and estimated disbursements of $96,420.00. 
After a discussion of the various budget items, W. 
B. Jones moved, seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, that 
the report of the Commissioner be accepted and ap- 
proved; and that the 1958-59 K.H.S.A.A. budget be 
adopted as presented. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

The Commissioner stated that the Kentucky 
Association of Pep Organization Sponsors was con- 
tinuing to do good work, and that the K.H.S.A.A. 
should continue to work with tliis group. President 
Williamson appointed K. G. Gillaspie as a commit- 
tee of one to work with KAPOS with the assistance 
of the State Office staff. 

W. H. Crowdus, Chairman of the Football 
Championship Committee, gave a lengthy report on 
the tentative plan which he and his committee had 
devised for the determining of footballl champion- 
ships in three classes, AAA, AA, and A. After a 
discussion of the plan presented, Robert P. Forsythe 
moved, seconded by Louis Litchfield, that the Foot- 
ball Championship Committee be commended for 
the work which it had done; that invitations be sent 
to football representatives to attend the meeting in 
Lexington on August 9, where the plan would be 
discussed and explained; and that the plan present- 
ed by the committee be submitted to member school 
principals involved shortly after the beginning of 
the fall term. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Louis Litchfield and K. G. Gillaspie, delegate 
and alternate respectively to the National Federa- 
tion annual meeting, held in Santa Barbara, Cali- 
fornia, on June 22-25, 1958, gave short reports on 
the meeting. 

Upon recommendation of the Trophy Commit- 
tee, W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Louis Litch- 
field, that the district and regional basketball tour- 
nament trophy specifications for 1958-59 be iden- 
tical with the specifications for 1957-58, and that 
the Commissioner be authorized to receive trophy 
bids. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner gave the following recom- 
mendations of the special committee appointed by 
President Williamson for basketball redistricting in 
Region 7: District 25 — Ahrens, Central, Flaget, St. 
(Continued on Page Twenty) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1958 



Page Three 



AUDIT (Continued from Pag-e One) 



Meals (State Tou 
Ticket Sellers and Takers 

(State Tournament) 

Lodging (State Tournament) 
Scorer (State Tournament). 
Umpires (State Tournament 
Expenses - Ass't. Manager 

(State Tournament) 

Films 

State Clinic 



ment) 



(State Tourna- 



60.00 
584.00 

26.50 
210.00 

41.00 
325.00 
92.08 

42.50 8.263.74 



K.H.S.A.A. Retirement Fund___ 

Cross Country: 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Meet) 

Trophies and Awards 

Expenses (Regional Meets) 

Miscellaneous Expenses 



586. BO 
336.47 
15.75 
43.50 



_$133,013.41 
- 114.357.57 
-$ 18.655.84 

$19,306.62 



National Federation 
Winter Meetine: 

K.H.S.A.A. Entertainment 563.05 

K.H.S.A.A. Double-Hcader 989.77 $ 

Receipts 

Disbursements 

Cash Balance 

BANK RECONCILEMENT: 

Balance per Bank Statement, June 30, 1958_ 
Less Outstanding Checks: 

No. 439 $ 26.00 

No. 528 10.00 

No. 614 52.40 

No. 670 108 no 

No. 683 64.58 

No. 684 20.55 

No. 685 12.00 

No. 696 33.40 

No. 688 3.49 

No. 689 76.25 

No. 690 151.52 

No. 691 92.59 650.78 

True Bank Balance June 30, 1958 $18,655.84 

FUNDS ON HAND: 

Cash Balance - First National 

Bank & Trust Company-_S18,655.S4 
U. S. Savings Bonds (Value 

.Tune 30. 1958) 33.745.00 

U. S. Savings Bonds (Rec'd 

from K.H.S.A.A. Annuity 
Trust Fund, Value June 30, 

1958) 13,911.10 

Savings Account - First Federal 

Savings & Loan Ass'n. __ 10,000.00 
Savings Account - Union 

Federal Savings & Loan 

Ass'n. 10.000.00 

K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund.. 4,089.41 
Total Funds on Hand, 

June 30, 1958 $90.401 -35 

Estimated Value of K.H.S.A.A. 

Building and Equipment.. $98,568.50 

RECEIPTS AND DUSBURSKMENTS 
1958 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
RECEIPTS: 

Ticket Sales $114,559.00 

Profit on Program 3.115.65 $117,674.65 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Printing 749.40 

Trophies and Awards 677.45 

Postage 180.00 

Public Liability Insurance 645-83 

Incidental Expense - (16 Teams) 4.800.00 

Transportation 1.318.80 

Lodging 3 937.75 

Meals 6,129.25 

Coliseum Rental 3,000.00 

Organist 40.00 

Officials' Fees and Expenses 1.489.40 

Scorers and Timers 4«0 00 

Shot Chart Keepers and Statisticians 2»0-00 

Ushers 204.00 



Ticket Sellers, Ticket Takers, and Guards 1,806.00 

Public Address Announcers 150.00 

Telephone and Telegraph 69.26 

Films 190.00 

Towel Service 34.43 

Taxi Service for Teams 108.59 

Additional Clerical Help - Ticket Sales-— 270.00 
Miscellaneous Exnenses - Tournament 

Manager 33.50 

Hon.>iariums and Expenses - Ass't. 

Tournament Managers 1.108.86 

Detective Service 660.00 

Audit 25.00 $ 28,323.52 

Transfer of Funds - Amount Transf-^rred 

to K.H.S.A.A. as Tournament Profit $ 89,351.13 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
K.H.S.A.A. PROTECTION FUND 
JULY 1 1957 TO JUNE 30, 1958 
RECEIPTS: 

Balance in Checking Account 

July 1. 1957 $ 7,044.87 

Plavers' Insurance Fees: 

Football: 4,281 (g $3,00 $12,843,00 

Phys. Ed, & All Sports 
except Football : 
6,897 m $1.00 6,897.00 



Officials' Insurance Fees: 

Football: 43 •('• S3. 00 $ 129.00 

Basketball: 239 .. $1.00 239.00 368.00 



Cash Transferred from 
K.H.S.A.A. Account 

Redepcsits (Bad checks 
good) 



12,000.00 

4.00 23,214,00 
Total Receipts $ 30,258.87 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Postage $ 150.00 

■inting 373.41 



CI a 



Paid: 



Football 16,548.86 

Basketball 6,080.89 

Baseball 397,65 

Cheerleading 35.65 

Clerical Help 2,006.26 



Federal Income Tax Withheld 


384.70 
113.50 
35.70 
37.84 
5.00 




Social Security 

State Income Tax Withheld 

City Income Tax Withheld 

Bad Checks 


26,169.46 










lance in Bank . 




.$ 4,089.41 


BANK 


RECONCILEMENT: 

per Bank Statement, June 30, 1958_ 

)utstanding Checks: 

622 $_20.00 

658 6.00 




.$ 4,868.86 


Less 1 
No. 
No. 






No. 


717 6,00 




No. 


742 B.OO 




No. 


759 . _ 5.00 




No. 
No. 


859 16.00 




No. 


918 35.00 




No. 


920 20.00 




No. 


921 50.00 




No. 


928 6 00 




No. 


942 5.00 




No. 


943 6.00 




No. 






No. 






No. 






No. 


957 3.00 




No. 


958 6.00 




No. 


959 ._ _. 36.25 




No. 






No. 






No. 






No. 


963 28.00 




No. 


964 20.00 




No. 


965 _- 50.00 




No. 






No. 


972 _ 22.00 




No. 






No. 


974 7.00 




No. 


975 50.00 




No. 






No. 






No. 


978 -. 10.13 




No. 


979 151.70 


779.45 









True Bank Balance. June 30, 1958 $ 4,089,41 



J 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1958 



Ky. Coaches Association 

April 5, 1958 
Executive Committee 

Kentucky High School Coaches Association 
Louisville, Kentucky 
Gentlemen: 

In compliance with instructions from your Sec- 
retary, Mr. Joe Ohr, I have made an examination 
of the records of your organization that were sub- 
mitted to me by Mr. Ohr for the period March 1, 
1957 through Ajjril 1, 1958. 

The results of transactions during this period 
are shown on the accompanying schedule of Cash 
Receipts and Disbursements. The balance in the 
bank of $4,529.83 has been confirmed as being on 
deposit in the Union Bank & Trust Company, Irvine, 
Kentucky, as of March 11, 1958. 

All receipts and disbursements as shown in the 
accompanying schedule appear to be correctly re- 
corded and are pi-operly substantiated by cancelled 
checks and invoices. 

In my opinion the accompanying schedule prop- 
erly reflects the cash receipts and disbursements as 
recorded for the period shown. 

Yours very truly, 

William Sexton, Jr., Auditor 

National Bookkeeping Service 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL COACHES ASSOCIA- 
TION, STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND 
DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE PERIOD MARCH 
1, 1957. THROUGH APRIL 1, 1958. 
RECEIPTS: 

Total Receipts $ 1,005.00 

Plus: Bank Balance Feb. 25, 1957 4.157.2.3 

TOTAL $ 5,162.23 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Postage $ 3.00 

Stamps and Membership Cards 34.00 

Delegate Evpense to K.E.A 25.00 

Audit of Secretary's Books 15.00 

Membership Collection Expense 180.00 

Secretarial Help 20.00 

Coach of the Year Awards 73.65 

firant Combs Fund 100.00 

Renewal of Charter 1.00 

Treasurers Bond 31.25 

All-Star Headquarters and Meals 121.05 

Expenses - Joe Ohr 19.45 

Expenses to National Rules Meeting 9.00 

Total Disbursements $ 632.40 

Excess of Receipts over Disbursements $ 4.529.83 

Balance in Bank on March 11, 1958 $ 4,529.83 

(Union Bank & Trust Company, Iryine, Kentucky) 

April 5, 1958 
Executive Committee, East-West All-Star 
Football and Basketball Games of Kentucky 
High School Coaches Ass'n. 
Louisville, Kentucky 
Gentlemen: 

In compliance with instructions from your Sec- 
retary, Mr. Joe Ohr, I have examined the records 
of your organization submitted to me by Mr. Ohr 
for the period March 27, 1957 through April 1, 1958. 

The results of the transactions during the per- 
iod are shown in the attached schedule of Cash Re- 
ceipts and Disbursements. The balance of $11,716.54 
in the All-Star Account has been confirmed as be- 
ing on deposit in the First National Bank & Trust 
Company, Lexington, Kentucky. 



St. Xavier's ChamoionshlD Tennis Tear 




'^^tt^ A- 

(Left to Right): Bro. Valens. Coach; John Evans, singles 
champion and member of the doubles championship team; James 
Spencer, of the doubles team. 

The records disclose total receipts from the All- 
Star Games ticket sales as being $10,632.00 after 
expenses of ticket sellers and ticket takers, etc., 
plus receipts from Programs of $936.67, giving a 
net deposit furnished Mr. Ohr of $11,568.67. The ex- 
penses are properly covered by cash receipts. 

The total cash receipts of $11,716.54 agree in 
amount with the deposits made in the First Na- 
tional Bank & Trust Company, Lexington, Kentucky. 

All receipts and disbursements as shown in 
the accompanying schedule appear to be correct 
and in my opinion this schedule presents correctly 
the cash receipts and disbursements on the All- 
Star Fund account for the period above stated. 

In addition to the above balance, I have also con- 
firmed a balance of $3,481.55 in Kentucky High 
School Coaches Association Savings Acct. No. 9315 
in the Columbia Federal Savings & Loan Associa- 
tion, Covington, Kentucky. This balance is as of 
April 1, 1958. 

Respectfully submitted, 
William Sexton, Jr., Auditor 
National Bookkeeping Sei-vice 
EAST-WEST ALL-STAR FOOTBALL AND 
BASKETBALL GAMES OF THE KENTUCKY 
HIGH SCHOOL COACHES ASSOCIATION. 
STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DIS- 
BURSEMENTS FOR THE PERIOD FROM 
MARCH 27, 1957 THROUGH APRIL 1, 1958. 
RECEIPTS: 

Receipts from All-Star Games $10,632.00 

Receipts from Programs 936.67 

Total Receipts 11,568.67 

Plus:Bank Balance March 27, 1957 7,221.51 

TOTAL $18,790.18 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Photos $ 65,00 

Printing 225.15 

Change for All-Star Games 600.00 

Watches for All-Star Players 1,389.39 

Misc. Travel & Telephone for Coaches 99.49 

Manager & Coaches Salaries 1.900.00 

Medical Bills - Players 395.14 

Advertising and Entertainment 47.86 

Travel & Meals for All-Star Players___ 887.17 

In.surance - Players 383.00 

Misc. Expenses 65.53 

Federal Income Taxes on All-Star Games 1,003.20 

State Taxes on All-Star Games 12.71 

Total Disbursements $ 7.073.64 

BALANCE $11,716.54 

Balance in Bank on Aoril 1. 1958 $11,716.54 

(First National Bank & Trust Co.. Lexington. Ky.) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1958 



Page Five 



Kentucky High School Baseball Tournament 

Stoll Field, Lexington, Kentucky 
June 4-5, 1958 



Shelbyville (2) 







Maysville (1) 


Maysville (7) 


Maysville- 




Maysville (3) 


duPont Manual (0) 










duPont Manual (8) 


Harlan (1) 










Fort Knox (6) 


Owensboro (6) 




Owensboro (7) 


-Champion 






Ashland (5) 




Harlan (9) 




Padiacah Tilghman 


(0) 





Harlan (3) 



Twenty-Sixth Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament 

Shawnee Park, Louisville - May 19 - 20, 1958 
SINGLES 



Evans - St. Xavier 


QUARTER-FINALS SEMI-FINALS 


FINALS 

Evans - 6-2; 6-0 




Tomer - Owensboro 


Evans - Default 






Duckor - 6-3; 6-0 


Evans - 6-4; 6-1 




B-aekor - KM I 










Evans - Berea Found 










McNerney - 




McNemey - Flaget 


Cohen - 
6-1; 5-7; 6-2 




Orr - Wag-goner 


6-3; 6-1 






Meyer - 6-3; 6-2 


McNerney - 
6-1; 6-8; 10-8 








Meyer - Bellevue 






Day - Covington 


Evans - 6-3; 6-2 








DaugWtery-Owens'boro 


MoElheney - 




McElheney-Covington 


6-4; 6-2 

Spencer - 
6-4; 8-6 


Spencer - 
6-2; 6-1 








Kute - Trinity 










Spencer - St. Xavier 




• 










McGill - Flaget 






1 


Hamblein-6-4; 6-3 






Hamblein - Bellevue 


Cohen - 6-2; 9-7 


Cohen - 6-4; 6-1 








Cox - University High 







Cohen - KMI 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1958 



St. Xavier 



Bellevue 



Berea Foundation 



Covington 



wensboro 



KMl 



TENNIS DOUBLES 
SEMI-FINALS 

St. Xavier - 6-4; 6-2 FINALS 

St. Xavier - 6-0; 6-1 



Covington - 
3-3; 6-3; 7-5 



Atherton - 6-4; 6-2 



Trinity 



KM! - 2-6; 6-4; 6-4 



Atherton - 
5-7; 6-2; 6-2 



St. Xavier - 6-4; 6-3 



Schools' Ratings on Basketball Officials 



eceived on basketball off 
luring 1967-58. The nun 
respectively the numbe 
ratings given to the official, 
" Ada 



of 



The followinK ratings were i 
registered with the K.H.S.A.A. 
following each name represent 
Excellent, Good. Fair, and Poor 

Abell, James Alvie. 0-2-1-0 ; Able. Forest, 0-6-0-0 
Ira R.. 0-3-1-1 ; Adkins. Alec K., 0-2-2-0 : Adkins, Harvey R., 
0-6-1-0 ; Adkins, Raymond C, 39-26-0-0 : Adkins, Tom, 21-17-2-0 ; 
Akins, Charles, 7-12-6-4; Alexander. Rex, 13-13-1-0: Allen, 
Jack, 10-14-3-2: Allen, Lowry, 1-0-0-0: Allen, Nelson, 8-12-3-0: 
Almon, James H., 0-«-l-0 ; Almond, Alvin, 4-18-1-0 ; Armstrong, 
Thomas Richard, 0-1-1-0 : Arnold, Kenneth L., 2.5-29-3-1 ; 
Arnold, Marvin R., 0-3-1-1 ; Arnzen, Stanley, 0-1-0-0 : Ashby, 
Carl C, 0-5-1-1 ; Ashley, Kenneth, 1-8-7-1 ; Austin, W. G., 
1-9-1-0. 

Bach, Bert C, 0-1-0-0 : Back 
Bailey, Arville, 4-11-1-0; Baird, 
Jr., 3-10-3-0 : Bak. 
33-35-4-0 ; Baker, Mor 



rian G., Jr., 2-18-5-2; 
10-1-1 ; Baker, Earl C, 
James A., 1-3-2-0: Baker, James E., 
1-0-0: Ballard. Jack H., 9-15-6-0; 



Ballinger, Richard L.. 2-6-4-1 : Bankemper. Jerome. 0-2-0-0 ; 
Bankemper, Thomas F.. 0-9-0-1 : Barker. Donald, 0-9-3-1 : Barker, 
Walter D„ 0-6-1-0 : Barlow, Billv B.. 0-1-0-0 : Barnes, Judson, 
5-5-3-1: Barnett, J. W.. 5-11-0-1: Barry. Harold L., 0-4-1-1; 
Bartlcy, Robert E.. 0-2-3-1 ; Barton, Walter W., 4-9-1-0 : Baskin, 
Sylvester. 0-7-0-1 ; Bass, Eddie, 0-5-0-2 : Batten. Wade H., 
1-3-0-0 : Baumeyer, William A., 5-4-1-1 : Beard. Monie. 21-22-1-1 ; 
Beard. Ralph M., 3-5-1-0; Begley, James P., 5-10-5-0; 
Bell. Clarence T., 0-13-2-0; Beniamin, Bernard, 0-1-0-0; 
Bennett, Bert A., 4-18-2-1 ; Bennett, Gene, 0-6-2-0 : Bentley, 
James, 0-1-4-1 : Berry, William, 0-10-2-0 : Best, Norris 
Gene, 1-2-2-1; Betz, Dick. 17-18-5-1; Billings. B. E., 2-6-3-1; 
Bishop, Thomas Dewane, 0-0-3-1 : Black. Charles D., 10-9-5-0 ; 
Black, Clarence. 22-32-9-4: Blackburn. Adr-an, 5-1-0-0; Black- 
burn, Clyle W.. 11-15-2-3: Blackburn. Vilev O.. 6-16-10-0; 
Blankenship. Zeb, 1-3-0-0 ; Blanton. Homer. 10-22-2-1 ; Blumer, 
Sherry. Jr.. 0-1-0-1 ; Bonner. William. 0-2-2-1 : Bowling. Roy. 
4-2-1-1 ; Bowman. Earl G.. 9-22-4-0 : Bovles. Jerry F.. 2-1-6-1 ; 
Bovles. Paul E.. 4-13-3-2: Bradshaw. Billy. 0-9-1-3: Branaman, 
Bill, Jr.. 6-18-0-0: BrauRhler. David L.. 1-3-1-0: Braun. Robert 
3-32-0-0; Brewer. Randal L.. 3-14-3-3: BHchler. Joe A.. 0-1-0-0; 
Bridges. Bennie E.. 25-35-6-0; Bright. Thomas. 0-10-1-0; Briscoe. 
;, 1 4-48-4-3 : Brnderick. Carroll 
5 J.. 3-8-1-0 ; Prown. Bryant, 
Jr.. 0-0-0-1 : Brown. C. R., 
: Brown, J. Carlton, 6-23-4-0; 
Brown John Will, S-21-3-0 ; 
ning. William Henrv. 2-18-1-0: 
imr.-ott Joseph W.. 8-20-2-1 ; 
I, Willa^m B.. 3-10-2-2: Brvant, 
el A.. 12-20-7-4: Bunnell. Ken- 
nier. 1-11-2-1 : Burke David L., 



Maurici 
•n. Charles L.. 
E. C-. 7-23-6-2 
W.. 34-28-2-8: 
0-1-1-0 : Browi 
Walter. 3-16-2-0: Bru 
Jack C. 6-4-0-3: Bvran 
n-i-0-0: Puis. Nath 
eth L.. 2-26-4-1 : Burchett. 



Ti^o 



Jack E., 



lavmond. 0-1-0-0: Burnett. Gorqlfl T., l-O-O-O ; 

Jr.. 0-10-3-1: Butcher, Granville, 2-8-1-0; 

-. 3-10-2-0: Butcher. Paul. 8-22-1-0: Butler, 

Butler, Donald A.. 1-21-8-2; Buzzerio. Larry. 



n-4-0-0 ; 

Burton. Dennis 
Butcher. .Toe M 
Cortez. 4-8-0-3 ; 
12-11-1-2. 

Cain. Malcolm. 0-1-0-0; Caldwell. .To. 
Foster. 2-2-1-1 ; Ca"nnbell. French. S-S-S-2 
13-1.5-0-0: Canady. Rav B., 1-3-1-0: Canter 
.Terrv. 11-14-6-0; Carvsle, John R 4-11- 
n-l-O-O: Carpenter, Leonard. 1-1 -O.n- C 
31-31-4-1: Carroll. Joe E.. 0-1-1-0- Cars. 



Cartee. Ralnh. Jr.. 23-31-2-0; Carta 
Jimes An^lorson. O-O-l-O; Cassody 
fassadv. Richard. 15-17-6-0: Ca.steel. 
Vernon B.. 1-5-0-0; Cathey. Gene S. 
0-2-0-0; Chafin. David L. 2-6-0-0; f 
Chattin. Charles. 32-26-1-0; Childs, She 



es, 6-6-1-1 ; Calhoun, 

Cmnbo'l John. Jr., 

:er. John 0-1-2-0 : Canos, 

1-6-1 : Carnes. Richard, 

Carpenter, William A.. 

rson Lou's N . 2-3-0-1 ; 

Clifton. 0-6-1-0 : Carter, 

Charles W.. 14-20-6-2; 

9-21-2-2; Gates, 

0-3-0-1 : Caudill- Carv A.. 

- 0-1-0-0; 



Pa 



W. W., 10-15-2-0; Co( 
nneth B.. 6-22-4-1 : Coll 
5-13-2-4 ; Colgan. Donald L. 



Combs, Travis. 13-10-1-3 ; Combs, Walt. 
George, 45-7-3-3 : Conley, Orville D,. 0-3-0-1 : 
0-2-0-1 ; Conley, Tom W.. 0-1-0-0 ; Cook, Max 
Cooke. George W.. 2-16-5-2 : Coombs. John 
Charles.0-1-0-0 ; Cooper, John F., 0-1-1-0 : 
2-13-0-0 ; Copper, John Wellington, 5-17-3-0 



inougher, Robert. 0-3-2-2 ; Coffey, 
Lvnn. 0-1-0-0 ; Coleman, L. J. 
1-5-6-0 ; Combs. Roy B., 9-33-5-3 



H., 



13-10-2-5 ; Conley 
Conley, Ted Lynn 
Wheeler, 0-16-4-2 
0-3-0-0 ; Coomer, 
Copper, Hewlett, 
Cooper, 



Copley, Sidney, 3-7-2-2 : Coppage, Donald L., 0-8-3-0 
Cornn, Harold, 7-5-0-2 ; Coulter, William, 0-3-0-0 : Cox, Rufus 
A., 0-13-12-0 ; Cox. William J. "Bill", 13-7-1-0 : Grace, Jam 
1-0-0-0: Craft, William N. ..Bill", 21-21-2-0; Craig, Randy, 
0-5-3-3 : Craig, John G., 5-5-2-0 ; Crosthwaite, John 
27-9-6-0; Crutcher, James W., 10-22-11-6: Crutcher. Joseph 
Lamar. 1-3-3-0 ; Cullivan, Jim, 6-4-0-1 ; Gulp, Willard E,, 0-1-0-0 
Cummings, Dale Avon, 0-6-0-0 : Cummins, Albert B.. 2-7-0-0 



Joshua W., 0-1-0-0 ; 
Robert L,. 1-6-0-0. 

Dale. Pat. 0-3-0-1 : Damii 
philus, 0-0-4-0 : Daum. Charles 
0-1-0-0 : Davenport. Bobby Jai 



port. Will 
IS. Dwight 
, William ' 

3r. Matt. 0-6-2-0 : Deck 
Fox. 17-39-6-0 ; DeM. 



rrent. Ellis R., 2-9-1-2 ; Curtis, 

Ernie, 2-14-0-0 : Danzy, Theo- 
1-6-0-0 ; Davenport, Billy Von 
0-1-0-0 ; Davenport, Robert B. 
T.. 4-18-1-1 : Davis. Donald 
., 9-30-4-1 : Davis, Ralph E. 
. 4-10-3-1 : Davis. William E. 
William K.. 0-4-5-0 
Truett R.. 22-32-0-0 



9-20-0-1 : Chu 



3-10-3-3 : Da\ 
13-9-0-1 : Da' 
6-7-6-1 : Davi 
1-1-0-0 ; DeB. 
DeMoisey. J. 

Denney, Billy L., 0-10-7-1 : Denton, Charles M., 0-3-1-0 ; Derrick, 
Charles A., 0-2-1-1 ; Deskins, Tilden, 3-1-1-0 : Diachenko, Nick 
C. 2-4-2-0; Dial, Jack, 1-1-0-0; DiMuzio, Robert M.. 4-21-4-3 
Dixie, Cornelius P.. 3-8-2-0 ; Dobson, Kenneth. 2-6-0-0 : Dorron 
Glenn U.. Jr., 0-2-0-3 : Dotson, John B„ 1-8-0-0 : Dotson, W. S. 
6-13-3-4; Downing. D. G.. 27-9-0-0: Downing. Thomas E. 
0-1-0-0: Dovle. Donald. 0-0-1-0; Drake, Richard R., 4-19-6-0 
nr^skell. Earl, Jr.. 1-7-0-1 : Duerson, William Robert, 1-3-0-0 
Duff, Birchell, 0-4-1-1 : Duncan, Earl, 4-29-4-1 : Durkin, Jack 
H.. 17-34-6-1. 

Eades. Jimmie, 0-4-2-0 ; Eads. Walter. 0-8-6-1 ; Earle. Her- 
schel G., 2-2-0-0: Eaton. James Marvin. 2-10-6-3: Eddings, 
Forrest, 0-4-3-1 ; Edelen, Ben R., 40-18-1-1 : Edwards, Hubert. 
0-1-1-0: Edwards, Lloyd, 0-3-1-0: Edwards. Owen D.. 0-1-3-0; 
Ellington, James E.. 0-15-4-1 : Elliott. Carroll L., 2-8-0-3; Elliott, 
Humnhrev T-. 0-2-.6-0 : Elovitz, Carl. 4-13-0-1: Elrod, R'chard 
T,.. 0-1-2-0: Elrod, Turner, 28-21-3-5: Emerson, William Henry 
O-G-4-0 : England. Cecil. 1-1-0-1 ; Evans. James. 2-7-4-2. 

Fagues Homer. 1-6-1-0; Fallon. Robert J.. 1-0-0-0: Fanning, 
Homer. 16-16-6-2; Farlev. James F.. 0-1-1-0; Farmer. John 
Clay "Jack". 2-8-1-0: Feix. Jimmie W.. 36-25-8-8; Ferrell. 
Doc 51-24-1-2: Fev. Allen. 0-9-2-3: Fields. Charles H.. 0-4-2-1: 
Fields. Ellis. 1-6-2-0: Fields, Joe D., 1-14-9-2; Figg, Charles 
R.. 1-13-1-2; Fitci^ko. Bill. 38-10-3-4; Flage. Robert A.. 0-4-1-1; 
FIvnn Bohhv. 35-32-1-5: Ford Joe T.. 2-3-0-0 t Forsythe. Robert. 
17-9-2-0: Fort. John W.. 2-7-1-1; Foster Berrvman, 3-18-2-0 
Foster, Will'am R. "Boh". 12-33-6-0: Fraley. Bill S., 0-12-3-1; 
Franc. Anthony. 2-1-1-0: Francis. George. 6-3-2-1; Francis. 
Wendell Y.. 4-6-2-0 : Fritz. Sherman. 20-38-4-4 : Fugate. E. 
HnTh. 11-17-10-5: Fugett, Karl F., 0-1-0-1; Fuson, Shelvie, 
6-12-4-0. 

Gamble. Gerald Eugene. 3-6-1-0 : Gardner. H. E., 16-29-5-1 ; 
Garrett. Jack. 4-19-1-1; Gates. Thomas F.. 0-2-1-2; Gettler. 
-Tohn P.. 13-9-2-2: Chson Romulus D.. 23-26-18-3; Gilbert, 
Gerald Leroy, 3-16-13-2: Gilbert, Lawrence "Butch". 2-3-1-0; 
Giles. .Tonathan W.. 0-0-0-1: GiPette, Bob. 0-1-1-0: Gilvin. Allie 
F.. 7-6-0-0; Giordano. AI. 13-11-2-1: Gish. Stanley. Jr.. 0-4-0-0; 
Goetz. Larry C. 3-1-0-0; Golden. Billy Joe. 20-16-4-2; Goley, 
.Tames E.. 0-3-0-2 : Goodin. Charles L.. 8-4-5-1 ; Goodin, Shirley. 
0-1-0-0 ; Goranflo, Robert E., 10-34-10-1 ; Cover, Robert J.. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1958 



Page Seven 



1-1-0-0 : Grace, Charles K., 5-9-8-0 ; Grace. Hickory E., Jr., 
6-14-3-1 ; Gray, Raymond. 12-32-5-1 ; Greathouse, Bobby, 
0-1-0-0: Green. Walter. Jr.. 1-1-0-0; Greenslait, James W., 
5-6-1-0 : Griese, Warren J., 0-4-0-0 ; Griffith, Daryel. 0-6-2-0 ; 
Grimes. James W.. 3-14-1-1 ; Grisham. Jesse R.. 4-23-2-2 ; Gus- 
tafson. Alford "Gus". Jr.. 31-34-4-4. 

Hackel. John C.. Jr., 0-1-1-0 ; Hadden, Newell P. Jr., 
12-26-6-0 : Hagan. Joseph E., 13-38-4-0 ; Hagedorn, Thomas, 
5-10-1-0 ; Hale, Don C.. 19-21-6-0 : Hale. John, 0-1-3-0 ; Hall, 
Bob, 2-8-4-2 : Haliinan, Garland R.. 0-2-0-1 ; Hamblin, Gayle. 
0-1-0-0 : Hammond, William, 0-3-1-1 : Hammonds, Norman, 
13-23-10-6 : Hampton, Barrel 0., 3-1-0-0 : Hampton, Wallace 
Ray, 0-6-2-0 : Hanes, Edward C., 5-13-6-1 : Harbin, Lorenzo 
W., Jr., 0-4-0-0 : Hardin, Ben, 3-6-3-1 : Hardin, Don, 3-4-2-0 ; 
Hardin, Jack, 5-3-1-1 ; Hargsi, Bobby S., 10-6-4-0 ; Harmon, 
Charles W.. 8-9-1-2 ; Harmon, Hayes Russell, 0-4-1-2 ; Harrell, 
Bill D., 20-13-1-4 ; Harris, Joe D., 4-5-3-0 : Harrod, Edmon, 
2-4-0-2: Hartley, William E.. '.O-x". 3-7-4-2: Harvey. Bennie, 
11-6-1-0; Hatter. Jack. 0-0-2-0: Hawkins. Ralph B., 0-0-0-1; 
Hawkins. Robert W.. 1-2-3-0 ; Hayden. Samuel J.. 2-1-1-0 ; 
Hayes, Douglas, J., 1-12-3-0 ; Haynes, John, 19-24-9-3 ; Head, 
Elmo C, 2-0-0-0 ; Heldman, John, Jr., 30-21-4-0 ; Hendren, 
Bill N.. 0-6-1-0 ; Hensley. Robert B.. 5-5-0-1 : Henson. Tony C. 
2-1-0-0 ; Herndon. Alton E.. 1-14-6-0 ; Hewling. Franklin C, 
0-9-0-1 : Hewling. Richard A., 9-40-5-0 : Hibbs, Eugene M.. 
0-6-6-0 ; Higgins. Bobby D.. 0-0-0-1 : Highttower, Kenneth T., 
1-3-1-0 ; Hill. Earl F., 1-6-0-1 ; Hill, Earl Foyster, 0-1-0-0 ; 
Hill, Jimmie, 0-11-1-0; Hils, M. David. 0-3-2-0: Hines, Cliff G., 
19-23-2-1 ; Hinkle, Melvin B.. 1-0-0-0 : Hiten. John W.. 4-6-1-0 ; 
Hobbs. Charles V.. 0-2-0-0 : Hodge. Don Robert. 2-8-2-0 : Hodge, 
Fred, 11-11-1-0: Hodges, Holbert, 2-2-0-0; Hoferer, Louis R.. 
6-4-1-1 : Hoffman. Jack J., 1-7-2-0 ; Hofstetter, Joe. 16-10-0-1 ; 
Hogg. Bill. 3-15-1-1 : Hoggard, Robert L.. 0-3-0-0 : Hogge, Gary 
A., 0-3-0-0 ; Holbrook, Arthur, 2-8-5-3 : Holeman. Bill R.. 
4-14-2-0; Holt. Robert, 0-1-1-0; Hooks, Robert H.. 12-9-0-5; 
Hopper, Edwin, 0-7-3-0: Hornsby, John W., 5-16-5-0; Horton, 
John, 10-26-4-1 ; Houchin, Robert R.. 8-28-4-1 ; Howard, Jimmy 
D., 1-10-3-0 ; Howard, Joseph W.. 0-10-1-1 ; Hubbard. Joel M., 
1-1-1-1; Hubbard, Ronald E.. 0-1-0-0: Hubbs. Cletus L.. Jr., 
4-9-1-0; Hudson, Oscar, 2-6-3-3: Huff, Carl R., 0-6-1-0; Huff, 
David N., 2-10-3-1 : Hughes, Charles F., 44-23-5-1 ; Huiet, Fred 
"Whitey", 1-1-0-0 ; Hummer, Irby, 4-27-8-1 ; Hunley, Neil P., 
15-32-1-3 ; Hunt, Jack L.. 0-4-3-0 : Hunt. Leonard D.. 10-17-1-0 ; 
Huntsman. Bill, 16-26-2-2; Hurst, David E., 4-9-4-1; Hurst, 
Harold M., 2-7-1-2 ; Hutchinson, Jack. 2-3-1-1 : Huter, James J.. 
7-19-7-1 ; Hutt, Joseph D., Jr., 16-44-5-1 ; Hyatt, Robert L., 
14-12-6-2. 

Inman. Briscoe, 12-23-3-1: Irwin, Charlie. 18-24-6-6; Ison, 
C. B.. 0-13-0-1 ; James. Gene. 0-2-0-0 ; James, William, 0-1-2-1 ; 
Jefferson, Charles R.. 0-2-2-0 ; Jenkins. E. E., 0-2-0-0 ; Jenkins, 
James D., 32-24-2-1 ; Jenkins, Kean. 25-25-3-3 : Jeter 
John B., 0-2-0-0 ; Johnson, John Luther. 1-0-0-0 : Johnson, Roger, 
1-1-0-0 ; Johnson, Walter, 20-9-2-2 ; Johnson, William Bernard, 
3-16-6-3 ; Johnston. Edward E.. 9-22-10-0 : Jones. Boyer, 
18-34-4-1; Jones, Carson, 4-10-9-8; Jones, Charles Junior, 1-3-1-0; 
Jones, Cornelius, 0-0-0-1 ; Jones. George W., Jr., 3-5-7-1 ; 
Jones, Robert T., 0-13-5-1 ; Jones, Wendell, 3-14-1-0 ; Jordan, 
Forbis, 2-8-1-0 ; Jordan, Ken, 19-36-1-0. 

Kastner, Alfred J., 0-1-0-0 ; Kazee, William Wallace, 
0-17-3-0 ; Keene, Marcum, 0-3-0-0 ; Keffer, Dick, 0-3-7-1 : Kelly, 
Callis, 0-2-0-0 ; Kereiakes, Spero, 1-2-0-0 ; Key. Calvin. 4-12-0-0 ; 
Kimmel, Jarry, 7-5-2-0 ; King, Allen J.. 4-10-4-0 : King, Bob, 
4-5-1-0 ; King, James A., 26-36-7-0 ; King, John J. 
Jr., 2-6-3-1 ; King. P. J., 0-2-0-0 : King, Russell. 0-6-3-0 ; Kin- 
man, Joe T.. 31-38-9-0 ; Kitchen, Leslie. 0-2-0-1 : Knapp. Robert, 
1-1-0-0; Knight, Bill, 16-23-0-0: Knight, Doug'^is 0-3-1-0; Kok, 
George W.. 6-21-1-1 : Kremer. Joseph A.. 3-20-8-3. 

Lambert. Kenneth L., 2-0-0-0 ; Lance, Walter N.. 43-32-10-1 ; 
Landolt. Gene. 22-26-11-0; Larson. Robert A.. 0-1-1-1; Lash- 
brook. Harry Eugene, Jr., 7-12-6-2 ; Lawson, Leland, 7-24-6-2 ; 
Lazarus, Rhea Price. 31-24-3-3 ; Leathers, O. C. Jr. 3-10-1-0 ; 
Ledford. James, 2-10-4-0 ; LeFevers, Jasper N. Jr.. 3-9-1-0 ; 
Lentz. Charles E.. 0-0-1-1 : Lequire. Harold Monroe "Buckett", 
18-12-1-0 ; Levan, T. F.. 1-20-6-2 ; Levicki. A. P., 3-0-0-1 ; Lewis. 
Jack C. 2-6-2-3 ; Litteral. Ray, 0-7-1-3 ; Little, James Glenn, 
0-1-1-1 ; Littral, James W.. 3-10-9-2 ; Long, William G., Jr., 
8-32-4-2 ; Longenecker, David M.. 29-28-3-2 ; Longo, Richard, 
0-0-1-0 ; Looney, Dick, 18-30-3-3 : Lowe, Eugene T., 0-0-0-1 ; 
Lucas, Gene T.. 34-26-2-6 ; Lusby. George. 0-0-1-0 ; Lvon, 
Manuel R., 3-2-0-0 : Lyons, Charles S.. 1-1-0-0 ; Lyons. Harold, 
2-3-0-0 : Lytle, William Price, 8-18-4-1. 

McAnelly. David F.. 2-6-0-0; McAninch. E. R.. 0-7-3-0; 
McBride. Donald. 2-4-2-0 : McBride. Kenneth W.. 2-15-5-3 : Mc- 
Claskey. Booker. 4-19-2-1 ; McCIellan, Leonard B.. 26-39-6-2 ; 
McCord. Anthony A., 0-3-2-1 ; McCord. Coleman. 6-9-5-2 ; Mc- 
Cormick, H. L.. 0-1-0-0: McCowan. Connell. 11-20-4-0; Mc- 
Dowell. Glenn D.. 3-9-0-0 ; McFall. Gene Gordon, 0-1-0-0 ; Mc- 
Glasson, Galen, 2-7-0-4 : McGuffey, Harold B.. 0-3-0-0 ; Mc- 
Guire. Claude L., 0-2-0-0; McHenry. Louis P., 10-17-7-0; 
McLeod, Robert N., 11-7-0-1; McNeil, Patrick. 11-13-3-1; Mc- 
Pike. Ray S., Jr., 2-15-2-4. 

Macon, Alan Leon, 11-20-6-2; Macy, Lowell Z.. 0-3-5-9; 
Mahan Boyd W.. 2-21-3-3 ; Mahan. Carle "Buddy", 21-16-1-2 ; 
Maines, George, 4-31-3-8 ; Marks. Howard R.. 0-2-1-0 : Martin, 
Howard I., 16-17-1-0 ; Massey, Douglas L.. 1-2-0-0 : Matarazzo. 
Salvatore M., 0-2-0-0 ; May. E. B.. Jr.. 17-20-6-1 ; May. Harold 
M., 0-0-1-1 ; Mayes, Edward. 3-13-4-0 ; Mayo. Henry L.. Jr., 
0-2-0-0; Mays. Ralph J.. 19-27-2-0; Mazza. Albert "Babe" 
8-0.0.0; Meade. Foeter, "Sid" 82.17.4.X! Meadows, Marvin Ray, 



Pain+sville's Championship Golf Team 




Ho 



(Left to Right): Coach House, H. Van Hoose, J. Van 
ise, Butler, E. Van Hoose, Johnson. Coach Walke. 



7-18-2-1 ; Meeks. Jack, 5-22-2-0 ; Melton, Curtis Ray, 1-0-2-0 ; 
Meredith, Clement A., 3-0-3-1; Merritt, Bob Lee, 1-6-1-1; 
Metcalfe, Earl L., 26-22-2-0 ; Meyer, Bud, 0-3-0-0 ; Mikez, Joseph 
A., 1-10-1-0 ; Miles, Francis, 1-1-4-3 ; Miles, John W., 0-0-1-0 ; 
Miller, Bill, 8-12-1-0 ; Miller, Bob, 25-16-1-0 ; Miller Claude. 
2-0-0-0 : Miller, Ferrel, 3-8-1-0 ; Miller, Jack, 4-13-2-0 ; Miller, 
John D., 1-5-0-0 ; Miller, Kenneth H., 0-1-0-0 ; Miller, Re.^ J., 
3-3-0-0 ; Miller, Roy L., 0-9-4-1 : Miller, William A., 0-2-0-1 ; 
Miller, William L., 0-4-3-2 ; Mills, Herman, 0-2-1-0 ; Miracle. 
Ed, 7-1-2-1; Mitchell, Jimmie, 5-11-6-1; Mobley, Tony, 0-0-1-0: 
Molen, James P.. 0-8-2-4; Moll, Francis B., 3-9-3-0; Monahan. 
Edward J., 0-5-0-1 ; Monahan, William G.. 6-9-1-1 ; Monroe, 
Robert W.. 1-6-2-2 ; Moody, Arthur L., 0-3-1-1 ; Moore, Ed. 
3-8-0-0; Moore. James B., 1-9-3-2; Moore, Joe W., 1-6-1-0; 
Moore, Robert W., Jr.. 0-1-0-0 ; Moricle, John, Jr., 0-5-1-1 ; 
Moser, Emerson, 1-6-2-1 ; Moser, Rudy Clay 2-7-6-1 ; Moss. 
Bobby, 1-10-4-2 ; Mouser, Henry D., 22-35-6-1 ; Mudd, Ed. 
22-17-7-5; Mullins, Arthur, 5-1-0-1; Mullins, B. E., 3-10-0-0; 
Mussman, Ralph, Jr., 28-26-2-1 ; Myers, Edward B.. 3-1-2-1. 

Nau, Bill, 17-7-3-2 ; Neal, Gene, 35-29-2-0 ; Neal, Marion, 
1-2-3-1 ; Newman, Bill, 2-7-1-1 ; Newnam, Luther G.. 13-5-1-0 ; 
Newson, Marley. 14-11-1-2; Newsome. Forest, 17-11-1-3; Newton, 
C. M., 15-10-0-1 ; Newton, Reason G.. 6-9-0-3 ; Nie, Allen Frank, 
2-3-0-0 ; Ni-xon, James W.. 2-18-7-1 ; Noble, Charles B.. 13-29- 
3-0 ; Noel, Paul W., 7-11-0-0 : Noel, Robert A., 0-4-1-0 ; Nord, 
Ed. 22-41-4-2. 

O'Bryan, Robert, 3-6-1-0 ; O'Connell, Jim, 3-5-0-1 ; O'Daniel. 
Jeff, 2-22-1-0 ; Odle, Thurman, 0-3-0-0 ; Oldham, Charles M.. 
1-8-9-1 ; Oldham. John H., 3-5-1-0 ; O'Leary, Charlie, 0-2-0-1 ; 
Omer, Billy W., 23-34-5-2 ; O'Nan, Eugene, 9-29-0-0 ; O'Nan. 
Norman, 2-4-0-0 ; Osborne, James C. 3-2-0-0 ; Overly, William 
H., 9-16-1-1; Owen, Arthur, 4-2-0-0; Owens, Homer, 8-6-1-0. 

Padgett. R. K., 7-26-4-4 : Page, Forrest C, 13-11-1-0 ; Page. 
Jimmie Dale. 5-4-2-1 ; Page. William D.. 7-1-1-2 ; Park. J. M.. 
2-14-6-3 : Pai-ker, Billie E.. 21-23-3-0 : Parrott. Lanny L., 
11-21-1-0; Partridge, Donald E., 0-1-2-1; Pate, N. Roy. 2-3-1-0; 
Patrcik. Charles C, 6-1-0-0 ; Patrick. Ralph. 1-4-1-0 ; Patton. 
John B.. 0-3-2-0; Payne, Gayle H.. 0-4-6-1: Peay. Curtis E., 
9-20-9-4 : Peden, Harlan, 1-1-2-0 ; Peeno, Harry R.. 0-2-1-0 ; 
Penrod. Joe B.. 9-29-1-0 ; Pergreme. Nard. 56-26-0-0 ; Perkins. 
William. 0-4-0-0 ; Perry, Earl Willie, 0-2-7-0 ; Perry, James E.. 
0-9-4-1 : Perry, James R., 0-0-0-1 ; Petett, Frank M.. 0-4-0-0 ; 
Petty. John F.. 0-1-0-0 ; Phelps, Ralph "Rudy", 36-18-6-1 ; 
Pierce, Bay, 0-3-3-0 ; Poe, Thomas Ervin, 4-30-6-1 : Polston, 
Billy, 1-2-0-0 ; Poppas, Nicholas, 11-21-4-3 ; Powell, Logan, 
9-13-7-6 ; Powell, Pat E.. 0-3-0-1 ; Poyher. Donald Boyd, 
1-6-1-0; Preece, Boyd C, 1-6-0-0; Bresson. Jim. 3-1-0-0; Pres- 
ton. Woodrow, 0-3-0-0; Price, .jimrhy Hart, 0-4-11-7; Prior, 
Lowell F., 0-1-0-0 ; Pruden. Jim. 0-2-0-2 ; Pursiful. Darrell, 
0-0-1-0; Pursiful, Cleophus, 21-7-6-1 ;Quigg, Ben F., IV. 4-19-8-0. 

Radjunas, Stan E., 2-2-0-0 ; Raines, Barrel, 0-1-0-0 ; Rainey, 
Jimmy, 9-3-2-0 ; Raisor, J. T.. 0-5-0-1 : Rail, Eugene, 6-20-5-5 ; 
Randolph, Donald M.. 1-14-4-0 ; Ratterman, Bernard W.. Sr., 
2-8-1-0 ; Rawlings, Charles, 3-3-2-1 ; Redman, Malvern G., 
2-8-2-0 ; Reed. Gordon, 10-26-7-1 ; Reeves, Kenneth, 9-4-6-0 ; 
Reinhardt, Myron S.. 10-21-1-1 ; Renfro, John Edwin, 7-10-0-2 ; 
Rentz, Thomas W.. 7-16-2-0 ; Reynolds. Howard M.. 0-0-1-0 ; 
Reynolds, W. J.. Jr.. 4-3-6-1 ; Rice. Willard S.. 3-2-2-0 ; Rich- 
ards. James, 24-17-3-0; Richardson, Charles E.. 2-16-2-3; Rich- 
ardson. Joe M.. 11-22-14-1; Rickard. Bob. 2-14-3-1; Ricketts, 
C. O.. 9-26-3-0: Riggs. William T., 2-14-1-0; Riley. Don B.. 
6-2-0-1 ; Ring, William H.. 2-0-2-0 ; Rison. Johnny B., 1-6-3-0 ; 
Ritter, Donald, 0-1-0-0; Ritter, Goebel, 17-11-0-1; Roark, Paul 
Glenn, 0-3-0-1 ; Roark, Van Venson, 0-4-1-1 ; Robards, John H., 
Jr., 0-14-1-2 ; Roberts, Earl C. 11-29-5-1 ; Robertson. Lee. 
12-21-4-6 ; Robertson. William R.. 1-4-1-2 : Robinson. Donald C, 
3-3-6-2: Robinson, Pearl, 1-2-1-0: Roby, Joseph L.. 1-2-1-0; 
Rocke. James M., 12-34-11-4; Roller, Otis. 8-17-7-2; Rolph. 
Harold J.. 3-0-0-0 : Rose. Lee H.. 3-2-1-0 ; Rose, Wallace C, 
16-22-2-0; Boaenbaum. Robert, 6-16-13.3i RothfUBS, Richard, 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1958 



1-6-3-G ■ Rouse, Clyde L.. 12-31-5-0 : Rozen. Morris. 3-9-4-1 ; 
Rubarts. Leland G.. 13-21-9-0: Rush, Jim T.. 1-3-3-0; Rush, 

Ralph, 1-11-8-1: Rusk, William Duncan, "Bill" 0-2-3-2; Russell, 
Allen. 24-4:S-:i-0 : Russell, Eugene "Eudy", 2-5-:i-0 : Russell, Joe, 
l:!-38-6-l. 

Sabato. Al, 0-1-0-0 : St. Clair, Robert L., Jr.. 1-3-0-0 : 
Salchli. Stanley W., 0-0-1-0 : Salyer, Paul H.. 0-1-1-0 : Samples, 
Gilbert, 8-15-5-2 : Sanders. Mel, 20-22-2-0 : Saylor, Deward, 
8-1-2-0 : Saylor. Gene. 3-3-2-1 : Scharfenberger. Irvin T., 
0-12-1-3 : Schellhase, David. 1-3-1-0 : Schlich, Paul E.. 8-22-4-2 : 
Schnebelt, Carl E.. 0-1-2-2 : Schu, Wilbur, 4-4-0-2 : Sch\vit2, 
2-3-0-0: Scott, Bill, 0-1-2-1: Scott, Emmanuel H.. 0-2-2-0: 
Scully, Thomas L., Jr., O-l-O-l : Seelye, Arthur L.. 2-7-4-2 ; Selvy, 
Curt, 12-21-1-1 : Settle, Evan, Jr.. 2-0-0-0 : Settle. Roy G.. 
4:!-21-5-l : Sexton. William L.. 2-12-1-0 : Shaw, Donald Lee, 
1-2-1-0 : Shaw. Earl, 1-3-0-0 : Shaw, Stanley E.. 1-2-3-1 : Shel- 
ton. Robert, 0-2-1-1 : Shively, Howard, Jr.. 1-13-12-2 : Shope, 
Lowell M., 0-2-0-0 : Showalter, John. 5-6-0-0 : Shuck. Thomas G., 
13-17-7-1 : Shumate, Fred R., 0-2-0-1 : Siler, Clarence M., 3-5- 
0-0 : Simms, Sylvester, 0-8-3-0 : Simms. Wavelan J.. Jr., 
0-3-3-1 ; Simpson. Paul D.. 0-16-2-0 : Skinner. Earnest. 0-0-6-0 : 
Skinner, Steveson Robert, 0-0-6-0 : Slack, Earl H.. 0-1-0-0 : 
Sloan, Wallace, 5-21-5-2 : Small, Rex, 1-10-2-2 : Small, William 
W., Jr. ■■Bill". 9-30-5-1 : Smith. Darrell Carlton. 3-2-1-2 : Smith. 
David, W.. 1-22-0-0 : Smith. Edgar J.. 4-28-6-3 : Smith, Edwin 
B., 12-17-10-2 : Smith, Elza. 0-8-2-2 : Smith, Eurie Hayes. Jr., 
3-8-2-1 : Smith, Eurie Hayes. Ill, 0-4-1-0 : Smith, Jack. 2-9-5-1 : 
Smith. Wayne N., 3-16-1-4: Smith. Wilbur W., 14-38-4-0: Smith, 
Willard, 3-8-2-0 : Smithson, Richard, 6-5-4-0 : Snider. Louis G., 
3-10-1-0: Snowden, Ken, 0-1-0-0: Solomon, Jim, 6-27-12-0: Sosh, 
LaRue, 22-8-2-1 : Sosh, Nelson, 18-15-2-1 : South, William P.. 
6-29-5-8: Sowards. Clement B., 0--2-0-4 : Spaulding, Stan. 
0-6-1-0: Spencer. Edward. 1-4-2-1: Spencer, Irvin E., 2-12-6-3; 
Spiceland. S. E.. 0-19-3-4; Spurlock. Ralph. 12-8-2-0; Stacy. 
Richie M.. 0-12-4-1 : Stamper. Robert L., 6-13-2-2 ; Stanfill, 
Robert S.. 3-13-5-2 : Steely. Stanley E.. 3-9-1-1 ; Stephenson, 
Harry S., 23-13-1-0 ; Stephenson, Thomas Hatwood, 0-3-0-0 ; 
Stewart. Herbert T.. 5-15-1-0 ; Strickrod. Daniel. 0-0-2-0 ; 
Stinson. Charles L.. 0-1-1-0 : Stinson. John. 5-7-3-1 ; Stone. Clif- 
ton. 2-5-1-0 : Stone. Doyle C. 0-1-0-0 : Stovall. John A.. 3-1-1-0 : 
Strange. William L., 5-24-10-2: Strong. Arnett. 20-11-2-1: Stur- 
gili. Barkley J.. 3-3-1-1 : Stutler. John P.. 1-4-0-1 ; Sullivan. 
Don C, 19-16-4-0 : Sullivan. Wallace Bryan. 2-5-2-3 : Summer. 
Harold Carl, 1-4-0-0 : Surface, William 0-2-1-0 ; Swope, William. 
0-2-1-0 : Sykes, Harry N.. 0-2-1-0. 

Tate. Harold D.. 0-1-0-1 : Taylor, Carl. 1-3-0-0 ; Tavlor. Carl 
L., 5-12-3-0 : Taylor, Dennis H., 6-7-2-0 : Taylor, Ed, 14-34-3-7 ; 
Taylor, Hal, 10-27-5-3: Taylor, James, 0-7-1-0; Taylor. Robert 
S.. 10-23-8-1 : Teague. Amos, 53-24-6-3 : Thoma, M. L.. 10-26-6-0 ; 
Thomas, Harold E.. 0-5-0-0 ; Thomas, William G., 0-8-3-0 ; 



Thompson, Jack, 54-36-2-0 ; Thompson, Ralph, 2-9-2-1 ; Thurman, 
A. Earl, 2-5-2-2 : Thurman, Harold, 0-1-1-1 ; Thui-man, Robert. 
0-23-9-3 : Tichenor. Billy. 3-7-8-4 ; Tichenor. Jimmy, 0-2-0-1 : 
Tincher, Robert, 5-4-1-3 : Tipton. Asa I.. 5-27-5-5 : Tolbert. John 
Lewis. 0-7-2-1 ; Tolle. Charles W.. 0-1-0-0 ; Telle, Lewis D., 
0-2-0-0 : Topmiller, Ben, Jr.. 3-17-6-1 : Torian. Virgil, Jr., 
8-18-7-2; Trivette, John Bill, 4-2-1-0: Troutman, Dovle C. 
6-11-1-0 ; Tuck. Ochell L., 6-31-:5-3 ; Tucker. Neal R., 0-5-3-0 ; 
Turner, A, J., 9-8-4-0 ; Turner, Thomas, 0-1-0-0 ; Tye, Bobby R., 
0-1-4-0. 

Ulsas. Charles F.. 0-2-0-0 ; Urlage, Richard. 0-2-0-0. 

Vance. Earl G.. 2-11-0-1: Vandergriff. Gene, 4-16-8-2; Van- 
hoose, Edgar N., 0-0-1-0 ; Van Meter, Kaye Don. 0-3-2-1 ; Van 
Sant. William E.. 1-6-3-3 ; Van Zant. Jim. 7-16-0-1 : Varble, 
William. 11-22-2-2; Varner, Ray G., 6-18-6-2; Vaughn. Melvin, 
2-4-2-2 : Vice, Cliff, Jr., 0-1-0-2 : Vinson, Ray T., 2-1-0-0. 

Waddell, William R., 1-2-1-2 : Wade, Bill, 5-10-4-1 : Wagers, 
Lyde, 0-2-0-0 : Waide. Harry, 0-2-1-0 : Waldon, Tot, 20-21-3-1 : 
Waldrop, Douglas, 0-3-2-1 ; Walke, Glenn R., 2-5-0-0 ; Walker, 
Lawrence I., 0-1-0-0 ; Wallen, Edgar, 0-1-0-0 ; Wallen, Howard 
Wendell. 0-4-0-0: Wallin. Buddy M.. 1-11-5-3: Walls. Harry B.. 
0-3-0-0 : Walter. Jim, 1-0-0-0 : Wanchic. Nicholas, 13-12-2-0 : 
Ward. Tommy. 12-18-1-2 : Waters, Allen Darnell, 0-2-2-0 ; War- 
kins. Byron C. 0-6-2-1 : Watkins. Earl. 0-5-1-1 : Watts. Shirley, 
2-3-1-0 : Weaver, Ray M., 2-4-2-4 ; Webb, Alvin B.. 0-0-1-0 
Webb. Jack L.. 2-3-0-1 ; Webb. Oren H., 2-2-1-0 : Weber. John 
5-10-1-1; Weisbrodt, Paul E.. 24-27-5-2; Welch, John H, 
0-8-4-1: Welch, Ralph W., 2-15-3-2: Welch, Tom, 1-2-1-1; Wells 
Milford, 34-19-2-6 : Westerf'eld, Glenn, 3-14-3-3 : Whalen. Wil 
liam Clinton, 0-2-2-2 ; Whedbee, Melville F.. 6-6-0-0 : Whipple 
Lloyd G., 7-7-0-0 ; White, David B., 6-13-1-0 : White, James 
2-7-0-0: White William Jason. 2-3-2-0: Wilcox. Edgel M. 
5-7-3-0: Wilder. Murris. 0-5-1-0; Willey. Harold. 0-1-0-0: Wil 
liam Clinton. 0-2-2-2 : Whedbee. Mleville F.. 6-6-0-0 ; Whipple 
Lewis P.. 8-10-1-3 : Williams, James H., 2-10-5-1 ; Williams 
Reid v.. 2-1-0-0 ; Williams. Roger. 10-28-9-3 ; Williams. Tom M., 
8-15-0-0 : Willis. Robert A.. 6-4-1-1 : Wilson, Burnell Zeke, 
2-3-2-0 : Wilson, Jack R.. 37-23-1-0 ; Winchester. Roy L.. 19-23. 
4-2 : Winfrey. Shelby. 38-25-8-2 : Wingfield. Felix G., 2-2-0-1 
Wise, Billy V.. 6-9-2-1 : Wise. Jack. 29-13-1-1 ; Withrow. Roy 
D.. 4-16-2-0: Witt Fred. 0-2-0-0: Witschger, Leroy J.. 1-0-0-0 
Woford. Ernest, 0-8-0-0 : Womack, William H., 5-12-6-1 : Wood 
Donald Kay. 0-3-0-1 ; Wood. James W.. 1-1-0-1 ; Wood. Kenneth 
C. 0-4-1-2; Woods. Clyde M., 4-1-2-0; Wray, Darrel, 1-18-1-3 
Wright, Billy Joe. 1-26-6-0 ; Wright, H. W., Jr.. 0-1-0-0 ; Wright, 
Larry LaRue, 0-5-3-0 ; Wright, Paul, 3-13-2-2 ; Wurts, Emil 
H., 2-15-1-2. 

Yates. William D.. 0-26-4-0: Yeary. William H.. Jr.. 2-1-2-0; 
Yessin. Humzy. 19-19-2-0: Young. Billy Joe. 6-22-0-2; Young, 
Coleman L.. 1-6-3-0 : Zalla. John W.. 0-0-1-0. 



Officials' Ratings on Sportmanship of K. H. S. A. A. 

Member Schools in Basketball, 1957-1958 



County. 



Alle 
Aim 

Alvaton 

Anderson 

Annville Institute. 

Ashland 

Athens 

Attucks 

Auburn 

Augusta 

Austin Tracy 



Bald Knob . 

Ballard Memorial 

Barbourville 

Bardstown 

Bardstown Training. 

Bate 

Beaver Dam 

Beechwood 

Belfry 

Bell County 

Bellevue 

Benham 

Benton 

Betsy Layne 

Black Star 



COACH 




OTHER 


SCHOOL 




CROWD 






TEAM 




OFFICIALS 










G F P 


E G F P 


E 


G F P 


K 


G F 


6 


2 




42 


5 


1 




36 


10 


1 


1 


39 


7 


1 


21 


4 


12 


30 


15 






20 


22 


3 




19 


22 


4 


8 


3 


1 


36 


7 


1 




32 


9 


3 


1 


30 


9 


3 


11 


2 


6 


37 


14 




2 


29 


20 


1 


5 


33 


20 


2 


4 




2 


43 


2 






39 


6 






42 


4 




5 


1 




40 


3 


1 




33 


10 


1 




32 


10 


1 


4 






43 


4 






40 


6 


1 




39 


6 


1 


9 


1 




37 


5 






26 


11 


3 


2 


32 


9 


1 


1 


1 


3 


37 


5 






37 


6 






35 


7 




5 


1 




46 


3 






34 


11 


3 




37 


9 


1 


5 


2 




50 


10 






44 


14 


2 




52 


7 


1 


5 




1 


15 


4 






15 


4 






16 


4 




4 






52 


3 






50 


5 






49 


6 




13 


1 




37 


10 






33 


14 






36 


11 


2 


9 

1 


4 


2 


26 
30 


9 






23 
26 


11 






21 
28 


12 
1 


1 
1 


18 


10 


9 


36 


16 


3 




27 


21 


11 


1 


21 


19 


12 


11 


3 


1 


36 


8 






30 


11 






•M 


14 


4 


2 






40 


5 






35 


7 




2 


38 


6 




2 


1 




45 


6 






40 


9 






44 


6 




8 


1 


1 


33 


8 






29 


11 






29 


10 


2 


3 






22 


3 






16 


8 




1 


16 


H 




8 


1 




12 


6 


1 




8 


9 






7 


9 


3 


16 


1 


1 


60 


9 






56 


10 




1 


56 


10 




14 


1 


1 


67 


7 






47 


17 






49 


14 




12 


2 


1 


29 


6 


1 


1 


24 


11 




1 


25 


9 


1 


10 


2 




55 


8 


1 




47 


12 




1 


64 


10 




25 


4 


1 


51 


19 




1 


44 


26 






44 


25 


1 


3 




1 


39 


3 






35 


5 


2 




37 


5 




6 






36 


4 






33 


7 






36 


4 




13 


4 


1 


63 


11 






47 


12 


3 


2 


46 


13 


2 


9 


3 


3 


32 


4 


1 


2 


28 


3 


3 


5 


33 


5 


1 


5 


1 




37 


13 






27 


18 


6 


1 


31 


14 


6 


6 






34 


7 






32 


9 


1 




28 


11 


2 


2 






43 


4 






37 


9 






42 


4 




9 


2 




21 


9 






18 


11 


1 




18 


10 


1 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1958 



Page Nine 



Boone County 

Bourbon County- 
Bowling Green 

Boyd County 

Bracken County. 

Breathitt 

Breckinridge Co.. 
Breckinridge Tra 
B 



Bridgeport 

Bristow 

Brodhead 

Brownsville 

Buckeye 

Buckhorn 

Buffalo 

Bunche 

Burgin 

Burnside 

Bush 

Butler 

Butler (Louisville) 

Butler Co . 

Caldwell Co 

Calhoun 

Camargo 

Campbell Co 

Campbellsburg 

Campbellsville 

Camp Dick Robinson 

Caneyville 

Carlisle 

Carlisle Co 

Carr Creek 

CarroUton 

Carter 

Catlettsburg 

Centertown 

Centra] (Clinton) 

Central (Louisville) 

Central City 

Chandler's Chapel 

Charleston 

Clark County 

Clarkson 

Clay 

Clay County 

Clifty 

College (Bowling Green) _^ 

Corbin 

Cordia 

Covington Catholic 

Crab Orchard 

Crittenden Co 

Crofton 

Cuba 

Cub Run 

Cumberland 

Cumberland County 

Cynthiana 

Dalton 

Danville 

Daviess County 

Dawson Springs 

Dayton 

Deming 

DeSales 

Dilce Combs Memorial 

Dixie Heights 

Dixon 

Dorton 

Dotson 

Douglass (Henderson) 

Douglass (Lexington) 

Douglass (Murray) 

Drakesboro 

Drakesboro Community 

DuBois 

Dunbar (Mayfield) 

Dunbar (Morganfield) 

Dunham 

du Pont Manual 

Durham (Campbellsville) 

Durrett (Louisville) 

Earlington 

Eastern 

East Main Street (Lynch). 

Elizabethtown 

Elizabehtown Catholic 

Elkhorn 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 

Erie 

Estill County 

Eubank 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1958 



Evarts 

Ezel 

Fariview 

Falmouth 

Fancy Farm 

Farmington 

Feds Creek 

Ferguson 

Fern Creek 

Fiaget 

Flaherty 

Flat Gap 

Fleming County 

Fleming-Neon 

Fordsville 

Forkland 

Ft. Knox 

Foundation (Berea) 

Frankfort 

Franklin-Simpson 

Frederick Fraize 

Fredericktown 

Fredonia 

Fulgham 

Fulion 

Fulton County 

Gallatin County 

Gamaliel 

Garrett 

Garth 

Glasgow 

Glendale 

Good Shepherd 

Graham 

Grant County 

Greensbui'g 

Greenup 

Greenville 

Guthrie 

Haldeman 

Hall 

Hanson 

Harlan 

Harrison County 

Harrodsburg 

Hartford 

Hawesville 

Hazard 

Hazel 

Hazel Green (East Bernstadt) 

Hazel Green Academy 

Heath 

Hellier 

Henderson 

Henderson County 

Henderson Settlement 

Henry Central 

Henry Clay 

Highlands 

High Street (Bowling Green). 

Hindman 

Hiseville 

Hitchins 

Hodgenville 

Holmes 

Holy Cross 

Holy Family 

Holy Name 

Hopkinsville 

Horse Branch 

Howevaliey 

Hughes-Kirk 

Huston villa 

Inez 

Irvine 

Irvington 

J. M. Atherton 

Jackson 

Jenkins 

Johns Creek 

Junction City 

Kingdom Come 

Kirksey 

Knott County 

Knox Central 

Kyrock 

Lacy 

Lafayette 

Lancaster 

Leatherwood 

Lebanon 

Lebanon Junction 

Lee County 

Leitchfield 

Leslie County 

Letcher 





COACH 




OTHER 


SCHOOL 




CROWD 






TEAM 










OFFICIALS 














K 


G 


V 


P 


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28 


9 


2 


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32 


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1 


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31 


9 
1 


1 




24 


13 
3 


7 
1 


1 
1 


27 
26 


9 
5 


7 
1 


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16 


1 




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13 


2 


3 


41 


19 


6 




45 


16 


4 


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3 


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51 


11 






42 


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13 






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6 


1 


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10 


1 


1 


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10 


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4 


3 




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3 


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11 


2 


3 


20 


15 


3 


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3 


1 




39 


6 




1 


27 


12 


3 


4 


36 


8 


2 


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15 


1 




25 


12 


2 


1 


28 


10 


3 




24 


15 


2 


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20 


3 


2 


39 


10 






30 


20 


3 




32 


19 


2 


33 


3 






33 


2 






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5 






30 


6 




43 


13 


3 


3 


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18 


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19 


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32 


21 


5 


3H 


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3 






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7 




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5 


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10 


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19 


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24 


7 


6 


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23 


7 


12 


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4 


27 


7 




1 


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16 


1 


1 


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14 


6 


S7 


2 


2 




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5 






30 


8 


3 




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9 


7 


44 


8 






50 


2 






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8 


1 


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1 




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9 


1 




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14 


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13 


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47 


15 


1 




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13 




1 


38 


21 


4 




48 


14 


1 


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14 


4 


1 


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6 


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15 


4 




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16 


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16 






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18 


1 


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1 




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12 






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25 


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1 


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37 


2 






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1 


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1 


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6 






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1 




37 


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1 


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20 


2 




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16 






22 


21 


4 


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13 


2 


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13 






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8 






31 


13 


1 




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10 




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5 


1 




30 


7 


1 




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6 




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1 




37 


1 






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4 


1 




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3 




29 


10 


3 


4 


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6 


2 




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12 


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3 


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3 


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3 


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38 






38 


3 


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38 


3 


3 


X 


30 


8 


4 


4 


34 


4 


6 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1958 



Page Eleven 



SCHOOL 
Lewisburg 


E 

40 
47 
44 
42 
47 
17 
12 
16 
12 
29 
38 
71 

9 
21 
52 
47 
46 
28 
16 
22 
43 
3U 
65 
46 
35 
33 
19 
34 
37 
35 
37 
41 
36 
45 
48 
30 
45 

7 
25 
27 
28 
10 
38 
31 
50 
38 
33 
44 
44 
46 
LO 
26 
37 
40 
31 
38 
32 
14 
33 
47 
66 
26 
30 
32 
34 
30 
38 
48 
62 
16 
22 
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27 
52 
28 
53 
23 
46 
43 
33 
34 
19 
43 
33 
46 
31 
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28 
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17 
15 
42 
43 
38 
30 


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42 
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29 
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24 
36 
38 
33 
34 
33 
14 
25 
45 
66 
23 
27 
25 
31 
28 
31 
48 
61 
14 
26 
22 
28 
47 
21 
48 
25 
45 
40 
36 
31 
19 
40 
34 
45 
35 
32 
42 
25 
43 
14 
6 
34 
34 
35 
29 


T 

G 

9 
11 
20 
19 
11 

9 

7 

7 

6 
22 
15 

7 

1 

9 
14 
17 
13 
11 

5 

9 

6 

4 
24 
11 

3 
18 

9 
10 

1 

8 

8 
17 
16 
17 
11 
15 
18 

2 

9 
11 
10 

7 

9 
19 
14 

4 

8 
10 
10 
14 

8 
14 

9 
14 

9 
13 

8 
11 
16 

8 

4 
10 
17 
16 
10 
14 
15 

7 

5 

7 
15 

9 
10 
13 

9 
15 

9 
24 
23 
19 
12 
13 

8 

7 
11 

9 

9 

5 

7 
12 
16 
10 
15 
12 

S 

4 


EAM 

F 

3 

1 
2 
3 

1 
5 
2 
3 
6 

6 
2 
5 

1 

3 

1 
2 
5 
2 
6 
2 
1 
5 
9 

4 
2 

1 

1 
1 

7 

2 
6 

1 
1 

2 
1 
2 
3 

1 

2 
1 
3 
4 
1 
5 
3 
3 
2 
1 

5 

2 

2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
3 
3 
3 
1 

4 
8 
3 
4 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 

2 
2 


P 










Lily 


2 






Lincoln (Middlesboro) 

Lincoln (Paducah) 


1 
1 


Lincoln Inst. ^Lincoln Ridge) 


1 




2 




2 




1 


Lloyd „ -_ 






2 








2 
















2 














Lynnvale 






4 




2 






McKee 




McKell 






1 






Madison Central _ - _. 




Madison Model 

Madisonville 

Magnolia 


1 










Martin .. ___ 








Mayfield 




May's Lick 


1 


Maytown _ _ . 








Memorial (Hardyville). __. 




Memorial (Waynesburg) 




Mercer _ __ _. _ 




















Millersburg Mili. Inst. .. __ 




Million 




Mirerva 




Montgomery County 

Monticello 
















Mt. Sterling 




Mt. Vernon ._. 




Mt. Washington 




Mullins .._ 




















Napier. ._ _.. 




Nebo ... 








Newport ... 












Nicholasville 




North Marshall . . ... 




North Middletown 




North Warren 












Old Ky. Home... .. _. 


1 


Olive Hill .. ... 


Olmstead _. 


1 






2 
















Owensboro Tech. ......... 





Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1958 



Owingsville 

Owsley County 

Paducah Tilghman 

Paint Lick 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park City 

Parksville 

P. L. Dunbar (Lexington) 

Peaks Mill 

Pembroke 

Perryville 

Phelps 

Pikeville 

Pine Knot 

Pineville 

Pleasant View 

Pleasureville 

Poplar Creek 

Powell County 

Prestonsburg 

Prichard 

Providence 

Pulaski County 

Raceland 

Bed Bird 

Reidland 

Richardsville 

Rineyville 

Riverside Christian 

Riverview (Hickman I 

Rockhold 

Rosenwald (Barbourvillet 

Rosenwald iHarlan) 

Rosenwald (Lebanon) 

Rosenwald (Madisonville) 

Rosenwald (Providence! 

Rosenwald Dunbar (Nicholasville) _ 

Russell 

Russell County 

Russellville 

Sacramento 

St. Agatha Academy 

St. Agnes (Uniontown) 

St. Augustine 

St. Camillus Academy 

St. Catherine 

St. Charles 

St. Francis 

St. Henry 

St. Joseph Prep 

St. Mary's Academy (Paducah) 

St. Mary (Alexandria) 

St. Patrick's 

St. Thomas 

St. Vincent Academy 

St. Xavier 

Salem 

Salyersville 

Sandy Hook 

Scott County 

Scottsville 

Sebree 

Sedalia 

Sharpsburg 

Shawnee 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Shopville 

Silver Grove 

Simmons 

Simon Kenton 

Simpson ville 

Sinking Fork 

Slaughters 

Somerset 

Sonora 

South Christian 

South Hopkins I 

South Marshall 

South Portsmouth 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Stearns 

Stinnett Settlement 

Sturgis 

Sunfish 

Symsonia 

Taylor County 

Taylorsville 

Temple Hill 

Todd County 

Todd County Training 

Tollesboro 

Tompkinsville 



1 I 
1 [ 
16 I 



4 


9 


12 


6 


9 


6 


13 


18 


g 


4 


8 


10 


8 


3 


6 


9 


13 


3 


14 


8 







OTHER 


SCHOOL 




CROWD 






TEAM 






OFFICIALS 














P 


E G F P 


E 


G F P 


E 


G 


F 


3 


3 


34 


17 


1 




23 


24 


7 




32 


15 


5 


1 
1 


2 


33 
28 


11 

7 


1 


1 


25 
26 


16 
9 


4 


2 


27 
25 


14 
10 


2 


!l 


9 


26 


18 


1 


1 


19 


21 


3 


3 


21 


18 


5 






41 


4 






35 


10 






38 


5 


2 


."i 


7 


42 


6 


3 




32 


9 


6 


4 


33 


10 


6 






31 


3 






28 


7 






29 


5 


1 






38 


10 


1 


3 


27 


12 


8 


6 


42 


8 








44 


12 






34 


22 






36 


19 


1 


4 


5 


24 


10 


2 




16 


15 


3 


5 


22 


12 


4 






34 


4 


1 


1 


24 


15 




2 


26 


11 


2 


1 




33 


7 


1 




29 


11 


1 




29 


12 








45 


5 






38 


12 






44 


5 


1 1 


1 


1 


46 


2 


1 


1 


45 


2 


2 


1 


42 


6 


2 


(i 




33 


7 


1 




30 


4 


6 


2 


32 


2 


6 


1 




45 


7 


1 




40 


11 


3 




46 


6 


4 


1 


1 


29 


16 


1 




23 


10 


11 


5 


24 


20 


4 


3 


4 


47 


9 


2 




42 


8 


6 


3 


42 


7 


7 


•2 




31 


8 


1 




26 


16 


2 




27 


13 


3 






29 


10 


1 




25 


13 


2 




29 


8 


2 




3 


18 


3 




2 


16 


4 


2 


1 


14 


4 


2 




1 


37 


7 


2 




29 


13 


3 


1 


36 


9 




2 




55 


7 






46 


13 


3 




38 


19 


5 


4 


6 


42 


10 


1 




36 


14 


3 




38 


12 


3 


11 




19 


4 


2 




18 


7 






16 


6 


3 


2 




46 


8 


1 




47 


8 


2 




38 


18 


1 


2 


5 


40 


8 




2 


35 


9 


2 


4 


21 


21 


5 


2 




bl 


6 






44 


11 




1 


41 


15 




1 
1 


4 


28 
3 

1 


17 

1 


3 


1 
1 


15 
3 


23 
1 
2 


8 


4 


23 
3 


26 

1 
1 


1 
2 


4 


6 


34 
6 
11 


8 
1 
4 


7 


2 


23 
6 
11 


11 
1 
5 


11 


8 


23 
6 
13 


17 
1 
3 


6 




2 


25 


8 


1 


1 


18 


13 


1 


2 


21 


10 


2 


2 




20 


10 


1 




17 


12 


2 


1 


19 


11 


3 


1 




8 


6 






8 


5 


2 




7 


6 


2 


X 


1 


26 


9 






22 


13 






21 


13 


1 


2 


1 


21 


9 


1 


1 


20 


6 


3 


3 


18 


11 


2 


1 




57 


13 






43 


23 


4 


1 


64 


14 


3 


1 




36 


9 


1 




37 


10 






39 


7 




2 


1 


3V 


3 


1 




28 


11 


3 


1 


28 


12 


1 


2 




31 
32 


4 
8 


1 
1 




28 
26 


7 
15 


1 




26 
30 


8 
10 


1 
1 


« 


3 


35 


9 


4 




33 


12 


1 


2 


31 


12 


4 


3 
1 


1 


32 
35 
35 


3 
6 
9 






29 
31 
39 


5 
11 
11 


3 


1 


24 
32 
34 


11 
9 
11 


1 

1 


1 


1 


34 


7 






32 


6 


1 


2 


27 


10 


2 


.S 


1 


50 


17 






33 


29 


5 


1 


38 


28 


2 


2 




37 


5 


1 




29 


14 


1 


1 


33 


11 


1 






34 


4 


3 


2 


30 


8 


2 


3 


32 


7 


4 


1 




22 


10 


1 




17 


16 


1 




19 


11 


4 


4 


7 


34 


13 






21 


22 


3 


3 


21 


19 


5 


1 




24 


10 


1 




17 


15 


2 


2 


21 


14 


1 






53 


2 






42 


12 


2 




50 


4 


1 


3 


3 


61 
11 


12 
4 


1 




51 
9 


20 
6 


3 




64 
11 


9 
4 


1 


3 


3 


3 


18 






28 


18 


6 




36 


15 


2 


4 


2 


42 


9 






32 


17 


1 




31 


16 


3 






50 


3 






39 


9 


4 


1 


47 


6 




2 


4 


37 


8 


1 


1 


29 


11 


3 


4 


27 


15 


1 


4 




45 


9 


1 




40 


13 


2 


1 


42 


11 


2 


4 


1 


36 


6 




2 


21 


22 


1 


1 


32 


13 




2 
1 




49 
33 


14 
7 






43 
27 


15 
13 


4 


1 
1 


48 
30 


15 
10 


1 


3 


1 


42 


7 


1 




35 


14 


1 




36 


12 


2 


3 


1 


37 


9 




1 


31 


15 


3 


1 


36 


10 


3 


1 


2 


49 


6 


2 


2 


41 


14 




1 


40 


15 


1 


4 


2 


49 


19 


3 




31 


36 


4 


1 


29 


29 


9 






10 


8 


1 




6 


10 


2 


1 


6 


12 


1 


7 


5 


60 


17 






45 


29 


2 


1 


43 


27 


6 






61 


4 


1 


1 


46 


19 


2 




55 


11 


1 


6 


3 


35 
44 


5 
9 


1 
1 




24 
38 


15 
15 


3 

1 




27 
38 


12 
16 


2 






59 


8 






47 


16 


4 




41 


19 


4 






46 


5 






35 


17 


2 


1 


40 


14 


1 


1 


2 


35 


7 


1 




23 


14 


6 




28 


10 


5 


1 




41 


9 






34 


14 


3 




36 


12 


2 


6 


1 
1 


46 
35 


10 

4 


1 
1 


1 


33 
30 


16 
12 


6 


4 


42 
29 


13 

12 


4 
1 






29 


7 




1 


26 


9 




2 


28 


8 




1 


3 


28 


16 






25 


18 


1 




29 


14 




3 




39 


14 






32 


18 


3 




33 


19 




4 




30 


11 


1 




26 


15 


3 




26 


10 


7 


1 




14 


4 


2 




13 


7 






16 


4 


1 1 


1 




40 


5 






29 


13 


2 


1 


36 


6 


2 


2 




30 


6 


1 




17 


16 


5 


1 


22 


13 


1 


2 


1 


34 
39 
35 


6 
10 
6 


1 




27 
33 
33 


12 
18 

8 


2 




32 
36 
35 


9 
16 
6 


1 


7 


1 


29 


10 






22 


12 


5 


1 


26 


12 


1 






40 


14 






36 


16 


2 




47 


7 




3 


1 


21 


7 






1(> 


10 


1 


1 


21 


6 


1 


4 


6 


36 


17 






24 


27 


2 




28 


20 


4 


1 




30 


11 






19 


17 


2 


3 


22 


17 


1 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOK AUGUST, 1958 



Page Thirteen 



Trigff County 

Trimble County 

Trinity 

Tyner 

Uniontown 

University (Lexington) 

Utica 

Valley 

Vaneeburg-Lewis County__ 

Van Lear 

Versailles 

Vine Grove 

Virgie 

Waddy 

Waggener 

Wallins 

Walton- Verona 

Warfield 

Warren County 

Wayland 

Wayne County 

Western (Owensboro) 

Western (Paris) 

Western (Sinai) 

West Main Street (Lynch) 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

William Grant 

Williamsburg 

Williamstown 

Willisburg 

Wilmore 

Winchester 

Wingo 

Wolfe County 

Woodbine 

Wurtland 




REPORT OF INSURANCE CLAIMS 



Three hundred thirty-five schools insured their att 
boys were insured, and in physical education and all 
mitted, with 955 totaling $23,063.05 being paid. 

School Claimant Injury Amount Paid 

Anderson Billy Shelton Head injury (special) $ 29.00 

Ashland Talmadge Everman X-ray 12.00 

Ashland Eobby Lee X-ray 5.00 

Ashland Joel Millikan X-ray 5.00 

Ashland Randy Rice X-ray 12.00 

Ashland Lanny Salyer X-ray 8.00 

Atherton Gordon Baer X-ray 7.50 

Atherton Charles Embry X-ray 6.00 

Atherton Dee Gatterdam__ 

Atherton Tom Grissom X-ray 

Atherton James Hammer X-ray 7.50 

Atherton James Hammer Leg injury (special) 61.75 

Atherton James Hammer Leg injury (special) 10.00 

Atherton James Kallaher X-ray 10.00 

Atherton Halbert Miller X-ray 12.00 

Atherton Jeff Morris Dental injury (special) 28.13 

Atherton David O'Brien X-ray 10.00 

Atherton Alan Ritchie X-ray 6.00 

Atherton Duane Schwartz X-ray 5.00 

Atherton Bill Shaver X-ray S.OO 

Atherton Bill Shaver Shoulder injury (special) 16.25 

Atherton Charles Walte X-ray 6.00 

Atherton Ronnie Wolfe Laceration - suture 5.00 

Auburn Johnny McCarley Laceration - suture 5.00 

Augusta Michael Welte Laceration - suture 5.00 

Austin Tracy Roy Francis Ankle and knee injury (special) 19.00 

Bagdad Bennie Bailey Laceration - suture 3.00 

Bald Knob Harold Clark X-ray 10.00 

Bald Knob Ray Duvall X-ray 10.00 

Bald Knob George O'Connell X-ray 10.00 

Ballard Memorial George Lane X-ray 7.00 

Ballard Memorial CJene Poole Elbow injury (special) 17.50 

Barbourville Bill Blackburn Broken finger. X-ray 20.00 

Barbourville Donald Carter Laceration - suture 5.00 

Barbourville Mike Cosner X-ray 10.00 

BErbourville John Detherage Dislocated shoulder 24.00 

Barbourville Glenn Disney X-ray 6.00 

Barbourville Langdon Richardson X-ray 6.00 

Bardstown Owen Brown Broken finger. X-ray 22.00 

Bardstown Philip Pash Dislocated elbow. X-ray 32.50 

Bardstown Carl Shofner Dislocated shoulder 30.00 

Bardstown Kenny Simpson Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 25.00 

Bardstown Jake Wommer X-ray 10.00 

Beechwood Dave Hill Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Beechwood Bill Kingsbury Fractured clavicle 21.00 

Beechwood Walter Shorey Neck injury (special) 190.00 

Beechwood Frank Thurman Shoulder nijury (special) 150.00 

Bell Co Condie Miracle Loss of teeth 60.00 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1958 



Belh 
Belh 
Belh 
Bell 
Bell. 
Bell. 
Bell< 
Bell. 
Bell. 



Ken Alexander Fractured metatarsal. X-ray 37.00 

Bob Auteri X-ray lO.OU 

Harry Bevis Leg injury tspecial) 207.08 

Danny Boen X-ray 10.00 

Chris Chriscofield Loss of tooth 8.00 

Dick Ernst X-ray 10.00 

Poni Gates X-ray 16.00 

Paul Seyberth K.dney injury (spec.al) 106.00 

Rudy Wuilleumier Fractured tiDia 50.00 

Benham. _ _— James Cornette X-ray Vi.Ou 

Benham. Larry Davis X-ray 6.00 

Benhami:::::::::::::::::::::::::::: Larry Davis ^■'■■■^y -.-—,- — mi 

Benham Larry Flanary Fractured radius and uina 36.25 

Benham l>on Hodges- II II II Loss of teetn (2 separate injuries) 100.00 

BenhamIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII>nil Nunner7IIVIIV._IIV_"__I.V_V__I.V.p'-''>' 6.0U 

Berea _ _ led Azbill Laceration - suture 5.00 

Berea xjanny Coleman X-ray 

Berea __ _ . Jerry Payne .yray 

Berea Uonnie Swope x-ray 

Black Star Curtis Barton Loss of toocn, brok. 

Black Star Curtis Barton Broken facing 

Black Star Melvyn Burnett -J 

Black Star. 
Sta: 



6.00 

6.00 

7.50 

th 50.00 

6.00 

7.60 

Don ckmp"bellIIIIIIII7IIIIIII""II"II.'$^-''ay l^"?!! 

Clinton Cornelius 'V''^ 



red radn 



7.50 
30.00 
7.50 
6.00 



Black Star Clinton Cornelius. 

Black Star Cnester Ealy 

Black Star Cnester Ealy „. „„ 

il^^lliSriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiic^H^;^;:^:^:::^^!^^^^ 3: 

Black Star Carl Howard -)" .^^ ^.50 

Star I'ommy Roaden i^-^^^ ~J— T JVnn 

aiar ., , . .' j.^^^. Fractured radms 31.00 

6.00 



ck Star- _ Calvin Scott 

Biack Star_I_I-I II— ^^"1 Kay Williams 

Boone County B'" Ask: 

Boone County James G 

Boone County Roger G 

County Larry W 



Bowling Green ^ 

Bowling 
Bowling 
Bowling 
Bowling 
Bowling 
Bowling 



— ---------X-ray 15.00 

ri-'avr.rT>r~ 'Laceration - suture 6.00 

i,ianam ^_^,^^ 20.00 

-----------Broken tooth 20.00 

"Laceracon - suture 5.U0 

Bob' Hei;^II'I-IIIIIi:iIIIi:iIi:i:i:-5-™y in'nn 

Philip Huddieston ?:^?^„;-;:::;::--v-::- Jl^'nn 



Bracke 



Buffalo 
Burgin. 
Burgin_ 






Loss of tooth, X-ray 27.00 

(special) 39.88 

Loss of tooih, x-ray 29.00 

Dental injury 50.00 

iry (special) 21.00 

teetn 50.00 

teeth 60.00 

1 carpal. X-ray 32.U0 

Disiocated linger. X-ray 16.00 

i"oot injury (special) 5fi.0U 

Ankie injury (special! 36. OU 

EiDow injury (special) 18.00 

Fraciured fibula 50.00 

X-ray 6.00 



Creeo" ' Norman J. 

Green 'Iir""IIirriIIIII'''e''''>' Polston V"??'' 

Creen ~ ~ Harold Reynold; 

Green ~II IIII'IIIIIIII'^''"'" *'" 

Countyl I I ~ Monte Cooper 

Countv ' ' -Jerry King 

Bracken Countyllllllllllllllllllli: J-'f "klin Teegarden Loss 

Breathitt County Bobby Dunn 

Bridgeport "^?"„I^'i''ey 

Bridgeport P^il Bryan 

Bridgeport "■, L- Gaines 

Bridgeport fw?"''j tT^ 

Bridgeport Ciiffoid Toles 

Rrndhead James Powell 

Br^dheart M'llard G. Richmond f -'''>' ; °-"" 

Brodhead ^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ Laceral.on - suture 6.0u 

Ronald Crutchfield o.siocaied elbow, A-ray 26.M 

Joe Hayslett Laceration - suture o.OO 

Robby MatheHylllllllllllllllllllllL'iS injury (special) 52.45 

_-.„. ^ jj jjQjij^j, _ r.ye injury (special) 43.30 

r"'?'" Wayne BowlingI.I.II."__V_.II.V_'__I.V_1_II-^-™y 

Bush 1 Darrell Deaton Broken facing 

RiKih ' Eugene Minton X-ray ._ 

Bush i"fo'd Moore tiloKen linger. X-ray 

D ti 7iZ''~r~, Raloh Bucklev rractured clavicle 

Buter iSh.vey) S^mmv Butler Fractured clavicle 13.00 

Shively) ^^"'"j;.."'^"^'^ Broken tooth 20.00 

X-ray 12.00 

John Devers_III'_IIIIII.IIIIIIIIIIII ^-ray 10.00 

mhivoiv'i Roger Goodwin X-ray 7.00 

Sh vl V J-m Grider X-ray 10.00 

Sh ve V James Keenan Dislocated snoulder 28.00 

Sh vev Keith Keltner X-ray 6.00 

SH- George Lee Loss of teeth 8.00 

iat!™!^! cr.lZvZu-;:.- x-ray 20.00 

10.00 

7.00 

5.00 



6.00 
10.00 
15.00 
30.00 



Buth 
Butl. 
Butl. 
Butl. 
Butl. 
Butl. 
But!. 
Butl 
Butl 
Butl 



(Shively) yw Curtis- 

(Shively) John W. Deaver, Jr 

(Shively). 



(Shively) Charl 

(Shively). 

(Shively) 

(Shively). 

County— 

Camargo 

Campbellsville___ 
Campbellsville— _ 
Campbellsville— _ 
Campbellsville___ 
Camp Dick Robi 
Robi 



_ __ Probus 

hael Sandifer X-ray 

Michael Sandifer X-ray 

Billy Scott Laceration 

Titus Lyle _ Laceration 

David Ware Fractured i 

Eddie Claycomb Laceration 

Greg Crabtree Dislocated \ 

Gerald Dunham Dental injury (special) 31.50 

Bobby Eastridge X-ray 10.00 

Bobby Curtis Fractured fibula 33.50 

Sharp Broken nose 10.00 



sutur 



suture- 



X-ray 27.00 



Camp Dick Robinson Gordon Yates Dental injury (special) 60.00 

Carlisle B'" Conley X-ray '""" 

Carlisle George Gaff in, Jr Fractured tib: 

Carlisle Leroy Hawkins X-ray 

Carrol Iton Mike Brindley Dislocated kr 



nd fibula. 



10.00 
90.00 
6.00 
12.00 
6.00 
5.00 
6.00 



Cavema 

Clay County 

Clinton County. 



Fred Jordan X-ray 

_Marvin Lewis Laceration - suture. 

Charles Brown Laceration - suture. 

; Lloyd Isenberg Fractured fibula 50.00 

Rollin Tarter Laceration - suture 5.00 

. Chester Benny Smith X-ray 6.00 

.Joe Cratt .. Laceration - suture 6.00 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1958 Page Fifteen 

Clinton County Jimmy DeForest Broken tooth 4.00 

Clinton County Billy Perdue Leg injury fspeciall 250.50 

College Eddie Dillard Fractured tibia and fibula 67.00 

College Frank Melton Dislocated toe, X-ray 16.00 

College Dickie Thomas X-ray 10.00 

Corbin Melvin Chandler X-ray 6.00 

Corbin Melvin Chandler Laceration - suture 5.00 

Crab Orchard Charles Blankenship X-ray 10.00 

Crittenden County Larry Baker Broken rib. X-ray 15.00 

Crittenden County Slick Frazer X-ray 12.00 

Crittenden County Phillip Hughes Fractured rib. X-ray 20.00 

Crittenden County John L. Kemper Dislocated wrist 15.00 

Crofton James Fleming X-ray 5.00 

Crofton Charles Sugg Fractured tibia and fibula 68.00 

Cub Run Louis Thomas X-ray 10.00 

Cumberland Cecil Bargei- Broken nose 12.50 

Cumberland Larry Jarvis Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Cumberland County Richard Bruton Fractured radius 25.00 

Cumberland County Donald Daniel Fracturde fibula 36.00 

X-ray . 12.00 

Fractured radius 40.00 

Fractured mandible 27.50 

X-ray 4.0tl 

X-ray 6.00 

X-ray 12.00 

Dislocated femur 35. (W) 

Laceration - suture 5.00 



riand County Randal Flowers 

Cumberland County Randal Flowej-s 

Cumberland County Robert Lee 

Cumberland County Stephen Rowe 

Cumberland County Rondal Scott 

Cynthiana Robert Donovan 

Cynthiana Paul Ewalt 

Cynthiana Paul Ewalt 

Cynthiana Phillip Richie Fractured fibula 25.00 

Cynthiana James A. Ross Loss of tooth 25.00 

Cynthiana Donald Wagoner Fractured ribs 20.00 

Cynthiana James Wagoner Broken finger 10.00 

Danville Larry Boyd X-ray 10.00 

Danville Larry Boyd Finger injury (special) 20.88 

Danville Harold Chambers X-ray 6.00 

Danville Harold Chambera X-ray 20.00 

Danville Roger Foster X-ray 8.00 

Danvill> Donnie Galloway X-ray 10.00 

Danville Benny Garr X-ray 10.00 

Danville Bobby Griffin Dental injury (special I 35.50 

Danville Bobby Griffin Laceration - suture 5.00 

Danville Warren H. Griffith Broken finger. X-ray 16.00 

Danvillj Warren H. Griffith Fractured tibia_. 48.00 

Danville Claude Hoffmeyer Loss of tooth 3.00 

Danville . Juddy Knight Laceration - suture 5.0' 

Danville Juddy Knight Dental injury (special) 81.00 

Danville Jack League Groin injury (special) 49.40 

Danville Benny Lester X-ray 8.00 

Danville Orvill Mace X-ray 10.00 

Danville Marion Minor X-ray 15.00 

Danville Jerry Rankin X-ray 9.00 

Danville Jerry Rankin Broken finger. X-ray 17.00 

Danville Stanley Saylor Knee injury (special) 21. SO 

Danville Bobby Stigall Dental injury (special) 5.00 

Danville Chad Wright Shoulder injury (special) 64.23 

Dayton Harry Campbell X-ray 10.00 

Dayton Phil Higgins Broken ribs. X-ray 30.00 

Dayton Jerry Hoeoker Laceration - suture 5.00 

Dayton Charles Huff X-ray 20.00 

Dayton Wally Sullivan Laceration - suture 5.00 

Dayton Wally Sullivan Spinal injury (special) 270.18 

Dayton Joe Wever X-ray 10.00 

Dilce Combs Memorial Edd Back Broken tooth 5.00 

Dilce Combs Memorial Farmer Begley X-ray 6.00 

Dixie Heights Leonard Adams X-ray 10.00 

Dixie Heights Ronald Bennett Broken thumb 10.00 

Dixie Heights Charlie Bolton X-ray 10.00 

Dixie Heights John Heckman Broken tooth 6.00 

Dixie Heights Jim Isaacs Broken tooth 6.00 

Dixie Heights Homer McClure X-ray 12.50 

Dixie Heights Elwood Robinson Laceration - suture 5.00 

Dixie Heights Jim Ross X-ray 10.00 

Dixie Heights Tom Scott X-ray 10.00 

Dixie Heights Basil Singleton Knee injury (special) 150.00 

Dixie Heights Terry Stith Broken nose 20.00 

Dixon Tommy Cook Knee injured and requiring surgery 75.00 

Dixon Donald Rigdon Loss of tooth 3."0 

Dixon Ronnie Towe Loss of tooth 3."0 

Douglass (Lexin<;ton ) Sarah Bowles Foot injury (special) 35.65 

Dunbar (Lexington! Robert Finn, Jr Laceration - suture 5.00 

Dunbar (Lexington i Ralph Givens Kidney-ruptured, blood in urine 23.00 

Dunbar (Lexington I Raymond McClellan Dislocated knee 35.00 

Dunbar (Lexingtoni Cecil Mobley Fractured metacarpal, X-rav 25.00 

Dunbar (Lexingtom Ogden Tatnm Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 26.00 

Dunbar (Lexington) Kenneth Turner Laceration - suture 5.00 

duPont Manual Edwin Alster Nose injury (special) 130.15 

duPont Manual Charles Chandler Broken tooth. X-ray 24.00 

duPont Manual Bill Ferriell X-ray 13.12 

duPont Manual T,mes Hudson Broken tooth. X-ray 24.00 

duPont Manual James Hudson X-ray 13.12 

duPont Manual Kenneth Tee Dental injury (special) 67.50 

duPont Manual Richard King X-ray 5.63 

duPont Manual Bobby Lavman Broken tooth. X-ray 24.00 

duPont Manual Norman Leep ..Fractured radius ... . 15.0" 

duPont Manual Ronald Metry Dental injury (special) S7.50 

duPont Manual .T»mes R'Vketts Dental injury (special! 62 ."TO 

duPont ManuaJ Parker R'dings X-ray .. 7.50 

duPont Manual Ken Smith Knee iniury (special) 147.10 

J..T,- ' " ' " "mith Knee injury (special) 150.(T0 

Whalen Dental injury (special) 67.50 



Page Sixteen THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1958 

Durrett Bruce Gaddie X-ray 9.50 

Durrett Billy Hadley X-ray 7.50 

Durrett Bill Raymer X-ray 5.00 

Durrett Terry Rudolph Back injury (special) 98.23 

Durrett Fred Schneble Leg injury (special) 15.00 

Durrett Richard Stiles X-ray 6.00 

Eastern Bob Carey Loss of tooth. X-ray 26.00 

Eastern David Hardin X-ray 20.00 

Eastern Roger Pattison X-ray 6.00 

Eastern Richard Peloff Wrist injury (special) 62.50 

Eastern Don Ray Taylor Foot injury (special) 15.00 

East Main Street Tom Jenkins X-ray 20.00 

East Main Street Rodney Kincer Knee injury (special) 101.78 

East Main Street James Molley X-ray 6.00 

East Main Street Phillip Oakley Laceration - suture. Loss of tooth 30.00 

East Main Street Sam Potter Broken tooth 20.00 

East Main Street Sonny Rice Broken tooth 20.00 

East Main Street William Rice Broken tooth 6.00 

East Main Street Allan VanHooser Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Elkhorn John W. Badgett Dental injury (special) 86.60 

Elkhorn David Conway Laceration - suture 5.00 

Elkhorn Billy Co.x Fractured metacarpals. X-ray 37.00 

Elkhorn Tommy Crittenden X-ray 12.00 

Elkhorn Tommy Luscher X-ray 20.00 

Elkhorn Tommy Luscher Spinal injury (special) 15.63 

Elkhorn Donald Mahoney Ankle injury (special) 19.30 

Elkhorn Tommy Nelson Knee injury (special) 48.00 

Elkhorn Guy Reeve Hand injury (special) 27.00 

Elkhorn Leon Tracy. Jr Nose injury (special) 82.25 

Elkhorn Bobby Wood X-ray 4.00 

Elkhorn Bobby Wood X-ray 6.00 

Eminence Billy Allen X-ray 6.00 

Eminence Gareth Hollar Broken finger. X-ray 22.00 

Eminence Gareth Hollar X-ray 7.50 

Eminence Charles Raisor X-ray 6.00 

Eminence Charles Raisor Broken nose 10.00 

Eminence Charles Raisor Dental injury (special) 55.00 

Eminence Joe Rucker X-ray 6.00 

Eninence Tames Spurr Dislocated knee 4.50 

Eminence David Wilson Knee injury (special) 123.65 

Eminence David Wilson X-ray 6.00 

Eminence H. D. Wilson X-ray 6.00 

Evarts Paul Amburgey X-ray 15.00 

Evarts Jimmy Bates X-ray 5.00 

Evarts Roy Evans Broken teeth 15.00 

Evarts William Large Fractured radius 22.50 

Evarts Jack McPeek X-ray 6.00 

Evarts Ewell Smith X-ray 5.00 

Evarts Don Parsons Dental injury (special) 20.00 

Evarts Alton Witt Loss of teeth 50.00 

Falmouth William Browning Loss of teeth 50.00 

Farmington Grover Gardner Broken finger. X-ray 13.50 

Farmington Donald Ray Pigg Broken finger. X-ray 22.00 

Ferguson .loe Frank Minton Broken tooth. X-ray 29.00 

Fern Creek ^ Bill Bailey X-ray 10.00 

Fern Creek _ Eddie Cleary X-ray 5.00 

Fern Creek Eddie Cleary X-ray 15.00 

Fern Creek ,_^ Lynn Coe Loss of tooth. Broken tooth 45.00 

Fern Creek Tom Duffy Head injury (special) 36.00 

Fern Creek Leslie Ford X-ray 10.(.0 

Fern Creek William W. Hess X-ray 10.00 

Fern Creek John Huggins X-ray 10.00 

Fern Creek Richard Humphrey X-ray -0.00 

Fern Creek Richard Humphrey Mouth injury (special) 16.50 

Fern Creek Graeme Lowe X-ray 5.00 

Fern Creek Russell Oiler Leg injury (special) 299.23 

Fern Creek Jim Pike Broken tooth 20.00 

Fern Creek Jim Pike Broken tooth 20.00 

Fern Creek Terry Pike Laceration - suture 5.00 

Fern Creek Robert Lee Rose, Jr X-ray lO.llO 

Fern Creek William Speer Kidney and liver injury 36.00 

Fern Creek Ronald Williams Laceration - suture 5.00 

Flaherty Clarence Foushee ^i-ractured metacarpal. X-ray 32.00 

Flaherty Gene Mills Fractured fibula 50.00 

Fleming County Kenneth Carpenter X-ray 6.00 

Fleming County William A. Collins Fractured metatarsal 22.00 

Fleming County Emery Fields X-ray 12.00 

Fort Knox Dennis Dinota Dental injury (special) 30.00 

Frankfort Mac Brashears X-ray 6.00 

Frankfort Isaac Greene Dental injury (special) 75.75 

Frankfort Isaac Greene Dental injury 10.50 

Frankfort Noel Jones ntslocated finger. X-ray 15.00 

Frankfort Johnny Sergent Fractured clavicle. X-ray 3S.00 

Frankfort Douglas Sutterlin X-ray 6."" 

Frankfort Jesse Brooks Thomas Knee injury (spocial) 138.00 

Frankfort Kermit Williams Tiroken tooth. X-ray 24.00 

Franklin-Simpson Frankie Hudson Broken tooth 10.00 

Franklin-Simpson Don Rowland X-rav 6 00 

Franklin-Simpson Don Rowland Fractured metatarsal 16.00 

Fredericktown Leon Young Fractured ulna 40.00 

Fredonia Walton Woodall, Jr Rack injury (special) 30.93 

Fulgham Larry Stewart X-ray 6.00 

Fulton Philip Andrews Broken finger. X-ray 16.00 

Fulton Carl Arrington Laceration - suture 5.00 

Fulton Joe Barnes X-ray 6.00 

Fulton Jimmy Cheatham Broken finger 7.50 

Fulton Billy Copeland X-rav 9.50 

Fulton Jack Forrest X-ray 6.00 

Fulton Charles Huddleston Fractured radius 37.60 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1958 



Page Seventeen 



tooth 10.00 



X-ray- 



Hanson 
Harlan. 
Harlan. 
Harlan. 
Harlan. 
Harlan. 
Harlan. 
Harlan. 
Harlan. 
Harlan. 



Fulton Charles Huddleston Broken tooth 6.( 

Fulton Johnny Jones .^ X-ray 6.( 

Fulton Roy Morrow Laceration - suture 5.( 

Fulton Roger Pique Laceration - suture 5.{ 

Fulton County Donald Curlin X-ray 7.! 

Fulton County Eddie Mosley ^ X-ray 12. ( 

Fulton County Ermon Workman ^ Laceration - suture 5.( 

Gallatin County Harry Brcisacher Leg injury (special) 500. C 

Garth James Earl Lewis— X-ray 12.( 

Garth Tom Mulligan Broken nose 8.( 

Garth Bobby Raisor Broken nose 18.( 

Glendale Larry Hatfield X-ray 7.i 

Glendale Michael Speck Broken 

Graham John Gillaspie Broken 

Graham John Gillaspie X-ray 

Grant County Billy Joe Stewart X-ray 

Grant County Robert Turner Broken 

Guthrie Jimmy Darke X-ray _. 

Guthrie Billy Trevena Dental injury (special) 37.E 

Hanson- _ Mac Arthur Coble Dislocated finger 5.{ 

Mac Arthur Coble X-ray 6.C 

Robert Asher Fractured clavicle 35.( 

Bob Blanton X-ray, Laceration - suture 11. ( 

Jack Chitwood X-ray 5.( 

Frank Crider X-ray 5.( 

Jim Greer X-ray 15.( 

Jim Greer X-ray 10.( 

Randy Myers Head injury (special) 32.^ 

Randy Myers X-ray 5.( 

George Pollitte, Jr X-ray S.( 

Leslie Roark Laceration - suture 5.( 

Albert Scalf Loss of tooth 25.( 

Leon Withers Broken rib, X-ray 20.( 

Ray Thomas Cox Broken rib 9.( 

Jackie Freeman X-ray 5.( 

Bruce Parks Broken tooth 6.( 

Robert Stratton Dislocated finger 8.( 

Robert Stratton Broken tooth 8.( 

Tony Votaw Broken teeth. Chipped tooth 33. ( 

Kenneth Cobb Elbow injury (special) 41.! 

Jim Crutchfield Laceration - suture 5.( 

Jim Crutchfield Loss of teeth 50.( 

Bill Stewart Fractured metacarpal 13. f 

Robert Huff X-ray 7.! 

Henderson Paul Barron, Jr Loss of tooth 25. ( 

Henderson Settlement Willard Lowe X-ray 6.( 

Henry Clay Robert Jones Knee injury (special) 152. E 

Henry Clay Sam Nelson Knee injury (special) 178. t 

Henry Clay Art Stickle Loss of teeth 50.( 

Highlands Gary Cochran X-ray 15.( 

Highlands Fred Crawford Laceration - suture 5.( 

Highlands Paul Finneseth X-ray 6.( 

Highlands Jim Flaig Fractured metacai-pal 20. ( 

Highlands Dave Hudepohl Laceration - suture 5.( 

Highlands Walt Kellen X-ray 6.( 

Highlands Denny McAfee Laceration - suture 5.( 

Highlands Denny McAfee X-ray 12. ( 

Highlands Douglas Martin X-ray 6.( 

Highlands Jerry Moore X-ray 20. ( 

Highlands Aaron Mosley X-ray 10. ( 

Highlands Aaron Mosley X-ray 10.( 

Highlands David Sorensen X-ray . 

Highlands David Sorensen Broken 

Hiseville Bobby Christie Fractured metatarsal, X-ray_ 

Hodgenville Billy Lee Arm injury (special) (i8.I 

Hodgenville James Sanders X-ray 6.( 



Harlan 

Harrison County. 

Harrodsburg 

Harrodsburg 

Harrodsburg 

Harrodsburg 

Harrodsburg 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 

Haj-ard 

Hazard 



Hazel Gr 



X-ray- 



Holn 
Holn 

Holy Cross 

Holy Cross- 
Holy Cross 

Holy Cross 

Holy Cross- — 
Holy Cross- 
Holy Family- 
Holy Name--. 
Hopkinsville— 
Hopkinsville— 
Hopkinsville — 



Irvin 



Irvine 

Irvington 

Jenkins 

Jenkins 

Jenkins 

Jenkins Leroy 

Jenkins ^ 



Bob Barton Laceration - suture- 
Kenneth Parker Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 26. ( 

Jerome Berling X-ray 15.( 

Richard Bertman X-ray (J.( 

Richard Hoffmann Knee injury (special) 17. J 

William Klein X-ray 6.( 

William Klein Laceration - suture 5.( 

William Moddeman X-ray 10.( 

Dan Stephenson Spinal injury (special) 81. ( 

Kenneth ClaryJ Fractured radius 40. ( 

Mike Gore X-ray 19.! 

Dorris Kirkman Knee injury (special) 99.] 

Kenneth Underwood Dislocated shoulder 35. ( 

Marion Horn X-ray 10.( 

Edward Ballard Dislocated elbow. X-ray 37.( 

Kenneth Floyd Broken toe. X-ray 8.( 

Harold Gould X-ray 5.( 

Abraliam Lewis X-ray 6.{ 

James Stevens Fractured humerus 15.( 

H. H. Tudor X-ray 20.( 

Tyrone Witt X-ray Cf 

Paul Wilson Fractured radius 30. ( 

Michael Dann X-ray 6.( 

William Howard Broken tooth 9.( 

James Mahan Shoulder injury (special I 70.! 

injury (special) 27.! 

Small wood Dislocated shoulder 35.^ 



Junction City Donald Carter Laceration - suture 5.( 

Junction City Tom Young Fractured tibia 28.( 

Knox Central Buford Bingham Broken finger. X-ray 15.( 

Knox Central .Jerry Hammons X-ray 5.( 

Knox Central Delphus Ore Ankle injury (special) 20.( 

Kyrock Grady Hudson Loss of tooth, X-ray 27.( 



Page Eighteen THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1958 

Kyrock Johnnie Vincent Dislocated elbow 15.00 

Lacy Marshall Fletcher Dental injury (special) 25.00 

Lacy James West Rib injury (special) 23.00 

Laiayette James Bell X-ray 12.00 

Lafayette Tom Binkley X-ray 12.00 

Lafayette Fritz Bodenheimer Loss of tooth. X-ray 27.00 

Lafayette Jim Burns Laceration - suture 5.00 

Lafayette Jim Burns X-ray 20.00 

Lafayette Jim Burns Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Lafayette Kenneth Campbell Fractured patella 50.00 

Lafayette Jerry Curtis Laceration - suture 5.00 

Lafayette Lyndell Evans X-ray 10.00 

Lafayette Roy E. Flynn, Jr X-ray 7.60 

Lafayette Jan Hacker X-ray 6.00 

Lafayette David Hammonds X-ray 8.50 

Lafayette Jim Hombirg Ankle injury (special) 32.00 

Lafayette Richard Hulette X-ray 7.00 

Lafayette Kenny Jayne Laceration - suture. X-ray 15.00 

Lafayette John Jenkins Head injury (special) 40.75 

Lafayette Allan Johnson X-ray 16.00 

Lafayette Jimmy Jones Broken finger. X-ray, Laceration - suture 21.00 

Lafayette Bobby Neal X-ray 5.00 

Lafayette John Ross X-ray 12.50 

Lafayette Tom Smith Broken tooth 24.00 

Lafayette Charles Stanley Fractured metatarsal. X-ray 31.00 

Lancaster Charles Ellis X-ray 6.00 

Lancaster Jackie Fathergill Broken finger, X-ray 13.00 

'' - ■- - - .X-ray 8.50 

..Head injury (special) 49.33 

12.00 

5.00 

Lebanon Otho Lawson Fractured radius 40.00 

Lebanon _' Jackie Owen Broken tooth 6.00 

Lebanon Thomas Simpson Head injury (special) 20.00 

Lebanon Joe Thurman X-ray 12.00 

Lebanon Rodney Wilcher X-ray 12.00 

Lebanon Junction Randall Baumgardner Ruptured spleen 50.00 

Lee County Floyd Roysdon X-ray 6.00 

Lexington Catholic Plummer Tram--ie'l Leg iniury (special) 34.50 

Lincoln Institute L-ira Roland. Jr. Loss of tooth. Broken tooth 45.00 

Lincoln Institute William Slaughter Knee injury (special) 109.48 

Lincoln Institute Allen Sullivan Knee injury (special) 290.11 

Livermore Norman Burden X-ray 10.00 

Livermore "^arroll Cook X-ray 10.00 

Livingston County Don Rinsstaff Dislocated shoulder 28.00 

Lloyd Fenton Angell X-ray 10."0 

Lloyd I^ogan Daugherty X-ray 10.00 

Lloyd Glenn Dees Chest and abdomen injury (special) 126.53 

Lloyd Glenn DVkerson Fractured rib. X-ray 25.00 

Lloyd Gilbert Fleek X-ray 5.00 

Llovd Teoffrey Long Knee injury (special) 197.48 

Lloyd Buddy Pyles X-ray 6.00 

Lloyd Arnold Ro»,inson Broken tooth. X-ray 24.00 

Lloyd Larry Smith Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 32.00 

Lloyd Gene Underbill Broken teeth 40.00 

Lone Jack Earl Jackson Fractured tibia and fibula 90.00 

Louisa Paul Donq-lass Fann-n Fractured humerus 75.00 

Louisa ^llen Hnlbrook Loss of tooth. Broken teeth 50.00 

Louisa Geortre D. Lew's Dislocated finger. X-ray 20.00 

Louisa Larry Lee Weeks Broken facing 5.00 

Lowes Tom Carter Laceration - suture S.^^O 

Loyall 'T'eddv House Fractured humerus 75.00 

Ludlow =!tanley Clasgens X-ray 5.00 

Ludlow Glnude Fightmaster X-ray 10.00 

Ludlow -Tohn Gaiser Laceration - suture 5.00 

Ludlow .Tack Howell X-ray 10.00 

Ludlow Danny Johnson X-ray 15.00 

Ludlow Lee Jones Broken nose 20.00 

Ludlow Dave McGuffey X-ray 10.00 

Ludlow Bob Miller X-ray 10.00 

Ludlow Frank Richmond X-ray 10.00 

Ludlow C<.rlos Shields.- X-ray 4.00 

Ludlow Kenneth Tramm"' Nasal injury (special) 123.50 

Ludlow Kenneth Tramme' X-ray 6.00 

Lynn Camp .Tohnnv Rowlett X-ray 20.00 

Lynnvale Donald Dennison Fractured fibula 50.00 

T.vnnvale JncV!e Mink Head injury (special) 32.00 

Lvnnvale .Tackie Mink X-ray 5.00 

Lyon County Rov Cothran X-ray lO.^O 

T.von County Tiobbv Dver Fractured fibula 32.00 

T.von County T.arry Rowland Laceration - suture S.^o 

M-'Tiowell Bobbv King Laceration - suture 5.'^0 

McKell Ray Dennis i^'ractured radius 34.00 

-Jerry Dwain Burr's X-ray 10.00 



-CeTi*rni Kirbv Allen Dental injury (special) 42.00 

William Cain X-ray 6.00 

Franklin .Tones X-ray f^ 10 

Mad'son-Centroi Tommy Reams X-ray 10.00 

Mad'son-Centrw' Douglas Whittemore Back injury (special) 28.'50 

Madison-Centr-il Sherman Young X-ray « 00 

Madison-Modol Johnny Bottoms X-ray 12.00 

M.,dison-Model Sam Chambers Broken finger. X-r-iv _ 22.00 

Mod-son-MoH^l J. C. Long Fractured radius snd ulna 75.00 

M^d'son-Mod-^l ,T, C. Long Arm injury (special) 5'^. 95 

Mndison-Morl-i Donald L. Mize _ X-ray 4.00 

M«d=son-MoH"i Bill PuUeet X-ray 10.00 

Madison-Modn' Ray Teatcr Knee injury (special) 20.00 

Mad'son-Model Rav Tmtter Knee in.;ury (special) 118.70 

Madison-Model Terry Woolum X-ray 6.00 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1958 Page Nineteen 



Madison-Model Walter Young Broken teeth 50.00 

Madisonville Ronnie Davis Broken rib, X-ray 20.00 

Madisonville Buddy Rucker X-ray 10.00 

Madisonville Jim Spence Broken rib, X-ray 30.00 

Madisonville Jim Spence Hand injui-y (special) 38.00 

Magnolia Donald W. Hunt X-ray 8.00 

Male Pat Cain Dislocated knee 20.00 

Male Nellis Kraft Fractured fibula 38.00 

Martin Jan Grigsby Fractured ulna 20.00 

Mayfield Donlad Dowdy X-ray 2.60 

Maytown Steve Allen X-ray 6.00 

Mercer County Edward Ray Bell Sacroiliac injury (special) 32.50 

Mercer County Guy McGinnis, Jr Fractured radius and ulna 57.50 

Middleburg _ Edfcar Watson Laceration -suture 5.00 

Middlesboro Ronnie Adkins Broken nose. X-ray 20.50 

Middlesboro .Ronnie Adkins Broken nose 27.50 

Middlesboro lid-vard Arnold Loss of teeth 50.00 

Middlesboro Charles Ballon X-ray 5.00 

Middlesboro Lonnie Beeler X-ray 6.00 

Middlesboro Lonnie Beeler Broken tooth 20.00 

Middlesboro Conley Bingham X-ray 7.50 

Middlesboro Karl Brittain Elbow dislocation 21.0C 

Middlesboro Karl Brittain Nose injury (speciall 37.23 

Middlesboro Karl Brittain Loss of teeth 50.00 

Middlesboro .Buddy Callison Dislocated shoulder. X-ray 35.00 

Middlesboro Buddy Callison Fractured rib. X-ray 18.60 

Middlesboro David Cawood X-ray . 5.0u 

Middlesboro David Cawood X-ray 6.00 

Middlesboro _ Wilburn Conner Elbow injury (special) 34.25 

Middlesboro Wilburn Conner X-ray 7.50 

Middlesboro Ules Day Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Middlesboro James Goforth Arm injury (special) 15.25 

Middlesboro _ _James Goforth Shoulder injury (special) 25.20 

Middlesboro John Ed Coins X-ray 20.00 

Middlesboro Pat Greer Leg injury (special) 15.50 

Middlesboro Dennis Guthrie X-ray 7.50 

Middlesboro James Harville Dislocated shoulder 12.50 

Middlesboro Johnny Loy X-ray 16.00 

Middlesboro Larry Lyon X-ray 7.50 

Middlesboro Lyle Mace X-ray 7.50 

Middlesboro Clyde Mason Leg injury (speciall 40.50 

Middlesboro Jim Massengill X-ray 15.00 

Middlesboro Jim Massengill X-ray 6.00 

Middlesboro Benjamin Miller X-ray 10.00 

Middlesboro Doyle Milligan X-ray 6.00 

Middlesboro Charlie Nagle X-ray 10.00 

Middlesboro Roy Robertson Loss of tooth 25.00 

Middlesboro Danny Schultz Laceration - suture 5.00 

Middlesboro Jimmy Shoemaker X-ray 6.00 

Middlesboro Timothy Sowders Knee Injury (special! 150.00 

Middlesboro Walter Taylor Laceration - suture 5.00 

Middlesboro Walter Taylor Laceration - suture 5.00 

Middlesboro Ben Webb Dislocated shoulder 19.00 

Midway Paul Eyer X-ray 12.00 

Midway Raymond Shepherd X-ray 12.00 

Million Charles Co.x Arm injury (special) 45.00 

Minerva Charles Boyd Kidney injury 50.00 

Pete Davis Dental injury (special) 63.50 

Eddie Mains Fractured fibula 60.00 

Monticello Kenneth Kennedy Fractured radius 15.00 

Mount Sterling Jimmy Adams Fractured vertebra 10.00 

Mount Sterling Jimmy Barnard X-ray 6.00 

Mount Sterling Eddie Bayes X-ray 7.50 

Mount Sterling Melvin Berryman Dental injury (special) 41.00 

Mount Sterling Hugh Black X-ray 6.00 

Mount Sterling Gary Broten Knee injury (special) 101.00 

Mount Sterling Richard Gibbs X-ray . 6.00 

Mount Vernon Billy Davis X-ray 12.00 

Mount Vernon James Fain X-ray 7.50 

Mount Vernon James Fain X-ray 6.00 

Mount Vernon Preston Nunnelley X-ray 10.00 

Mount Washington Barry Armstrong Back injury (special) 24.00 

Muhlenberg Central Dwain Jones Loss of teeth 50.00 

Murray Harry Allison X-ray 10.00 

Murray Harry Allison X-ray 6.00 

Murray Billy Grouse Loss of teeth 60.00 

Murray Leslie Caraway X-ray 6.00 

Murray Jimmy Cross X-ray 6.00 

Murray Mac Fitts X-ray 6.00 

Murray Jerry Henry Laceration - suture 6.00 

Murray Tommy Hurt X-ray 12.00 

Murray Dick Hutson X-ray 10.00 

Murray Ronald Kelley X-ray 10.00 

Murray David Miller Fractured metacarpal, X-ray 26.00 

Murray David Miller X-ray 6.00 

Murray Dan Parker X-ray 10.00 

Murray Frank Rickman Dental injury (special) 17.50 

Murray Danny Roberts X-ray 10.00 

Murray Jerry Rose Laceration - suture 5.00 

Murray Richard Vance Leg injury (special) 16.38 

Murray Eddie Wells Broken finger. X-ray 16.00 

Murray Eddie Wells X-ray 6.00 

Murray Training Dan Harrell X-ray 6.00 

Napier James Begley X-ray 6.00 

Napier Irvin Campbell Knee injury (special) 21.60 

Napier Ralph Carder Loss of teeth 50.00 

(Continued in September Issue of the ATHLETE) 



Page Twenty 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1958 




Edd 



Paintsville Golf Team Wins State Tournament 

The Paintsville High School Golf Team won the 1968 State 
High School Golf Tournament with the low score of 617. The 
tournament was held on the course of the Paintsville Country 
Club on May 27-28, and was managed by Principal Oran 
Teater of the Paintsville High School. The St. Xavier High 
School team was runner-up with a score of 619. and the Owens- 
boro High School team was third with 626. Other team scores 
were: Atherton. 637: Mayfield. 641: Shawnee. 651: Danville 
654: Flaget, 655: K.M.I., 658: Eastern and Highlands, 668: 
Trinity, 671 : Southern, 68:5 : Manual. 684 : Franklin-Simpson, 
695 ; St. Henry, 697 : Fern Creek, 706 : Bardstown St. Joe.. 708 : 
Waggener, 710 ; Lynch, 741. 

Eddie Schnurr of St. Xavier was individual champion with 
a score of 144. He shot the final round in a one-under-par 69. 
Ted Hale of Mayfield was in second place with 146. Rich Casa- 
bella of Flaget and David Butler of Paintsville tied for third 
with 147. 

One hundred two boys took part 
dividual scores of some of the leaders 

144— Schnurr (St. X.) 

146— Hale (Mayfield I 

147 — Casabella (Flagetl Butler Paintsville) 

148— Wvatt (Shawnee) 

149 — Severance (Country Day) 

15.3 — Young (Owensboro) 

154 — F. Settle (Owensboro), Harmon (Danville), Farlee 
(Atherton) 

155— E. Van Hoose (Paintsville). Lally (St. X.), Little 
(Shawnee). H. Van Hoose (Paintsville), Rich Pfeiffer (Eastern) 

167— Miner (St. X.) 

158 — T. Settle (Owensboro), Crutcher (Atherton), Ryan 
(St. Joe.), Combs (K.M.I.) 

159 — Coad (Manual), Johnson (Paintsville). 

160 — Johnson (Lynch), Peoples (Atherton), Northcutt 
(Country Day), Hoskins (Danville). 

161 — Augenstein (Owensboro), Spalding (College), J. Van 
Hoose (Paintsville) 

162— Hunt (Mayfield I, McNamara (Danville) 

163— Ahern (St. X.I, Demling (Trinity). Ehlen (Dixie 
Heights), Lyles (Scottsville), Rodriguez (K.M.I.) 

164 — Diehlman (Southern), McAtee (Highlands), Endicott 
(Eastern), Jones (Bowling Green I 

165 — Waterworth K.M.I.), Metzger (Shawnee), Miller 
(Atherton), Kelley (Highlands) 

166 — Brohman (Trinity!, Froelicher St. Henry), Doll 
(Manual), Hale (Martin), Belote (Mayfield). 



MINUTES (Continued from Page Two) 

Xavier, Shawnee; District 26 — DeSales, duPont Man- 
ual, J. M. Atherton, Male; District 27 — Butler, Dur- 
rett. Fern Creek, Southern, Valley; and District 28 
— Eastern, Kentucky Military Institute, Kentucky 
School for Blind, Louisville Country Day, Seneca, 
Trinity, Waggener. K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded 
by W. B. Jones, that the redistricting for 1958-59, 
as recommended by the committee be accepted. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Jack Daw- 
son, that the 1959 State Basketball Tournament be 
held in Lexing-ton and the 1960 tournament in 
Louisville if satisfactory arrangements can be made 
by the Board of Control. The Board was polled on 
this motion, with Crowdus, Dawson, Forsythe and 
Litchfield voting "Aye"; and Gillaspie, Jones, Thorn- 
ton and Williamson voting "No". 

W. H. Ci'owdus moved, seconded by Louis Litch- 
field that the 1959 State High School Basketball 
Tournament be held in Lexington if satisfactory 
arrang'ements can be made. The motion was car- 
ried unanimously. 

The Commissioner presented to the Board a 
request of the State Track Committee relative to 
sending a referendum to member schools, providing 
that additional track meets, called semi-final meets, 
be placed between the regional track meets and the 
State Track Meet. After general discussion of the 
matter, Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by K. G. 
Gillaspie, that the proposed plan of the State Track 
Committee be referred to the Delegate Assembly for 
a final decision on the necessary changes in the track 
rules, the effective date of the change to be 1960. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that the next meeting of the Board of Con- 
tol be held in Lexington on October 11, 1958. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

C. A. Thornton moved, seconded by Jack Daw- 
son, that all bills of the association for the period 
beginning April 11, 1958, and ending July 24, 1958, 
be allowed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Board was then called to order in its ca- 
pacity as Board of Directors of the K.H.S.A.A. 
Protection Fund. 

Secretary-Treasurer Sanford presented the list 
of claims which had been paid by the Protection 
Fund since April 11, 1958, the total amount of 
these claims being $5,147.40. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by Jack Daw- 
son, that the claims as presented by the Secretary- 
Treasurer be allowed. Motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned. 



TRACK MEET 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 
Broad Jump — 

1. Hamner — College High 

2. Smith — Tilghman 

3. Scobee— Mt. Sterling 

4. Jonson — ^M.M.I. 

5. Emmons — Highlands 

Distance: 21' 6" 
High Jumii — 

1. Gazaway — Lou. Central 

2. Hoagland — Fern Creek 
2. Points--Newport 

4. Hall — Henderson City 
4. Richard — St. Josephs 
4. Ballard — St. Josephs 



4. Westmeier — St. Xavier 

Height: 6' 0" 
TOTAL POINTS 

Louisville Central 58 

Tilghman 35V2 

Highlands 17 

Elizabethtown 15 

M.M.I. 14 

St. Josephs 121/2 

Bourbon County 12 

Eastern 10 

Bardstown 8 

Valley 7 

St. Xavier 63/4 

College High 6 

Lafayette 6 



Male 5 

Ashland 4 

Trinity 4 

Newport 4 

Hopkinsville 4 

Franklin-Simpson 4 

Henderson City 3% 

Fern Creek 31/2 

Atherton 3 

Mt. Sterling 3 

Boone County 2% 

Holmes 2^/2 

Crofton 2 

Caldwell County 1 

Lexington Dunbar 1 

Dunham 1 



U. of K. Coaching Clinic 

We hope you visited our display at the Coliseum during the University of 
Kentucky Coaching Clinic in Lexington on August 6-9, 1958. 

We are able to take care of any football orders in the most satisfactory 
manner, as our stock of football equipment is larger and more complete 
than ever. 

On special-made merchandise we feel confident that we can have the mer- 
chandise in your possession in plenty of time for any requirement. 

Any shipment made during the month of August will carry October 1, 1958, 
dating. 

On any of your incidental supplies check upon the following: 

Football tees, table pumps, electric inflators, shoulder pad laces, pant 
laces, shoe laces, plastic face guards, rubber teeth guards or pro- 
tectors, helmet paint for leather or plastic helmets, all types of chin 
straps, aluminum cleats, rubber cleats, dry stag line white for marking- 
football fields, blocking dummies, line markers, line&men's chains, goal 
line markers, sideline markers, football goal posts, sideline capes. Fair 
Play football scoreboards. Fair Play basketball scoreboards, portable 
bleachers, dry or wet line markers, Whirlpool Baths, Vibra Whirl 
Baths by Cramer, football posters, first-aid kits, Cramer's first-aid 
supplies, a complete line of practice jerseys, sweat socks, athletic sup- 
porters, surgical scissors, etc. 

We will be looking forward to seeing you at various times throughout the 
year. Look for our salesmen to call. 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

(Incorporated) 

PHONE 103 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

"WE SHIP THE DAY YOU BUY" 



SUTCUFFE IS REAVy 

with complete football, basketball 
and athletic equipment for the fall season 



PLACE ORDERS HOW! 

Now we can give you immediate delivery. No Delays! No Waiting! 
Stock merchandise can be shipped on the very day your order is 
received. 

QUALITY BRANDS 




Our stocks this year are the same top 
quality for which Sutcliffe is now well 
known — nationally-distributed, nation- 
ally-advertised, preferred-quality brands. 



SUTCLIFFE SERVICE 

Write us about your needs — we'll give one day service. For extra-quick 
service or information— pick up your phone and ask for AI Seekamp or 
J. W. Head in our main Louisville office— JUniper 3-0251. For "on-the- 
ground-service", SutclifFe's school representatives will contact you during 
the year as usual — Harry Blackburn, 1340 Linwood Ave., Columbus, 
Ohio, will cover the Big Sandy Valley; Bob Reis, 74 Pleasant Ridge Ave., 
South Fort Mitchell, Ky., will cover Northern, Central and Eastern Ken- 
tucky, Charles (Chuck) Shuster, Horse Cave, Ky., will travel Western 
and Southern Kentucky, and Al LeComte, 600 Orchard Drive, Louisville, 
Ky., will cover the Louis"iJle area, home telephone EMerson 6-7443. 



OFFICLVL BASKETBALLS 

No. RSS Rawling-s official 

College Ball $22.95 

No. RS3 Rawlings official 

High School Ball $17.95 

No. 100 Spalding official 

College Ball $22.95 

No. 125 Spalding official 

College Ball $16.95 

No. XB20 Voit official Rubber Ball__$16.75 



OFFTCTAl. FOOTBALLS 

No. 65V-T Spalding All Tan $15.95 

No. R5 Rawlings All Tan $15.95 

No. FIOOO Wilson All Tan $15.95 

No. F-1002 - TD $15.95 



BALLS FOR NIGHT GAMES 
No. .J5V-T2 Spalding Tan with 

white bands $16.45 

No. R5-S Rawlings Tan witb 

white bands $16.45 

No. F 1202 Wilson Tan with 

white bands $16.45 



SUTCLIFFE'S SCHOOL CATALOG 

If you have not received our Fall 1958 
Catalog by September 5, drop us a card 
and we will send you one promptly. 




THE Sutcliffe CO. 

INCORPORATED 

225 SO. FOURTH ST., LOUISVILLE, KY. 



■s^ 




High School AfhMe 

K. H. S. A. A. SCHOOL FOR BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 





(Left to Right) Front Row: Harry Stephenson, R. 11; Evan Settle, R. 8; Dave Longenecker, 
R. 7; James Jenkins, R. 5. Second Row: Howard Gardner, R. 6; Ernie Chattin, R. 16; Roy Settle, 
R. 3; Ralph Mussman, R. 9; R. K. Padgett, R. 12; Arnett Strong, R. 14. Third Row: Bill Nau, 
R. 13; Bennie Bridges, R. 10; Amos Teague, R. 2; Rex Alexander, R. 1; Charlie Vettiner, School 
Director; Dick Looney, R. 15; Joe Richardson, R. 4. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
SEPTEMBER - 195B 




Football Officials Meet at Lexington 




(Left to Rieht) Front Row: Bill Ga 



Northeastern Kentucky Football Officials Association, 



Harper. Alabama High School Athletic As 



Kentucky Conference Officials Association. Newport; Dave Longe- 

otball Officials Association. Louisville; Fred Rudolph. Jr.. Falls Cities Football 

uisville. Second Row: Clinic Director Edgar McNabb. Ft. Mitchell; Fred Crcasey, 

Conference. Sebree; John Fletcher, Mid-Kentucky Football Officials Association, 

Central Kentucky Football Officials Association, Lexington: Exec. Sec. Cliff 



•iatii 



The Kentucky High School Athletic Association, 
with the assistance of the area organizations of 
football officials, conducted a two-day meeting for 
football officials on August 8-9 in Lexington. Of- 
ficials from various sections of the state were in 
attendance. There men will be available for meet- 
ings and clinics throughout the forthcoming sea- 
son, and will assist in the registration of new of- 
ficials. 

Edgar McNabb, Assistant Principal and Athletic 
Director of the Beechwood High School of Ft. Mit- 
chell, was director of the School. Mr. McNabb has 
attended meetings of the National Federation Foot- 
ball Committee for several years, and is cun-ently 
Kentucky's voting delegate on the committee. He is 
also directing the 1958 football clinics for officials 
and coaches. 

The Association was fortunate in securing the 
services of Mr. Cliff Harper, Executive Secretary 
of the Alabama High School Athletic Association, 
for two of the sessions. Mr. Harper has been for 
many years a member of the Editorial Committee 
which prepares the Football Official's Manual, and 
he has recently prepared some excellent film strips 
which are being used on a nation-wide basis in foot- 
ball rules study. 



The Friday afternoon session included the 
following: 

A Coach's View on Officiating — Coach Rice 
Mount.joy, Boone County High School 

Report on National Federation Rules Meeting — 
Clinic Director Edgar McNabb 

The Pre-Game Conference and the Referee — 
Ralph Mussman, Northern Kentucky Conference 
Officials Association 

The Umpire — Dave Longenecker, Metropolitan 
Football Officials Association 

The Head Linesman — James Barlow, Central 
Kentucky Football Officials Association 

The Field Judge — Bill Gammon, Northeastern 
Kentucky Football Officials Association 

On Saturday morning, there was a Round Table 
Review of Mechanics followed by a discussion of 
1958 rules changes by Secretary Cliff Harper. Mr. 
Harper then showed the new film strips, and there 
was a discussion on various play situations involved. 
On Saturday afternoon Mr. McNabb and Secretary 
Harper led a discussion on false start, interior line- 
men, fair catch, pass interference, starting the 
clock, and other items of interest. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XXI— No. 2 



SEPTEMBER, 1958 



1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Football Questions 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or modify any 
rule. They are interpretations on some of the early season 
situations which have been presented. 

Installment I 

1. Play: Home team provides a. Q25 ball made 
by manufacturer Y. Visitors have ball of same trade 
number and request their ball be used when they 
put ball into play. 

Ruling: Assuming- that the home team ball is 
official and in satisfactory condition, the request 
should not be granted but if the surface or shape 
of the home team ball is obviously irregular, the 
request should be granted or the home team should 
be requested to provide a better ball. 

2. Play: What are some arguments advanced 
in favor of making Umpire responsible for timing? 

Ruling: The Field Judge is now generally ex- 
pected to take a position on or near line of scrim- 
mage for most plays and therefore, he assumes 
many of the duties of a linesman and has the 
responsibility of covering much of the downfield 
area when there is a pass or a kick. The position 
of today's Field Judge requires considerably more 
mobility than that of the Umpire. The Umpire is 
in a most advantageous position to see the snap 
(action that frequently starts the clock) and he is 
also in a favorable position to confer with the 
Referee concerning timing duties. 

3. Play: Is there a discrepancy between rule 
4-2, which indicates the Referee may blow his 
whistle to cause the ball to remain dead and the 
Case Book, which indicates any Official may do 
this ? 

Ruling: Yes. The rule (4-2) was adopted when 
only the Refei'ee was authorized to use a whistle. 
Since other Officials now use whistles, Play 137 of 
the Case Book should be used to show the intent 
of the rule. 

4. Play: What restrictions are placed upon of- 
fensive interior linemen ? 

Ruling: After a guard or tackle (in a balanced 
line) takes a position with one or both hands on 
the ground, he is prohibited from shifting to a new 
position. This prohibition is brought about by stat- 
ing that the hands may not be lifted or moved. Such 
lineman may slowly adjust feet to a more comfort- 
table stance or turn his head to see ball or oppon- 
ent without violating the provision. Ends may shift 
if they do not simulate action at the snap. 

5. Play: Guard Al or Tackle A2: (a) discovers 
he has lined up in neutral zone and he moves back 
deliberately to a position on line, or (b) on line 
adjusts his feet into more comfortable stance or 
slowly turns his head to see ball or opponents. 

Ruling: Legal in both (a) and (b). 
Comment: Restrictions of 7-1-2 pei-taining par- 
ticularly to interior linemen apply to a player "on 



the line." However, any player of A, whether or not 
he is on the line, can violate 7-1-2 by feigning 
a "charge which simulates action at the snap." 

6. Play: Player Al, who legally received verbal 
instructions from his coach at the sideline, or sub- 
stitute A2 carries a diagram or written instructions 
on to the field for use by other members of team A. 

Ruling: Foul. Act of receiving written or dia- 
gramed instructions on field is interpreted to be 
illegally communicating with players and, therefore, 
is unsportsmanlike conduct. 

7. Play: 1st Down-10. After tilting the ball, 
snapper: (a) moves the ball by sliding his hand 
along it or (b) lifts ball before snapping it. 

Ruling: Ball becomes alive in both (a) and (b) 
when first moved after tilting. If live ball is 
fumbled and if A has possession when ball is de- 
clared dead and B refuses penalty, the next down 
will be the 2nd. If B has possession when ball is 
declared dead and B declines penalty for illegal 
snap, next down will be 1st and 10 for B. 

8. Play: Near end of game, B is behind in score. 
Their four charged time-outs have been used. On 
succeeding play, a B lineman encroaches or is in- 
tentionally offside. On next play, he does same 
thing, obviously to stop clock after each play and 
conserve time. 

Ruling: Referee may penalize and then start 
clock as it is placed ready-for-play or he may pen- 
alize for unsportsmanlike conduct and start clock 
when ball is ready-for-play. In an extreme situation, 
Referee may order clock to continue to run while 
the penalty is assessed in order to prevent an ob- 
viously unfair act. 

9. Play: Fumble by Al is in flight when Bl 
jumps and gets it in his hands. He comes to the 
ground with a foot on or outside a sideline. 

Ruling: 2nd sentence of 7-5-4 specifically covers 
a forward pass in a similar situation but there is no 
specific statement about a backward pass or fumble. 
Official must decide when Bl secured "possession." 
Since nearly all such cases leave the matter in doubt, 
the Official will be on safer ground if he applies 
the forward pass principle and considers the ball 
as having become dead before there was "posses- 
sion." 

10. Play: Decoy A2 is tackled and Field Judge 
blows his whistle while runner Al is free and legally 
advancing toward B's goal. 

Ruling: Ball becomes dead at spot it was at the 
time the whistle was blown and it will be put in 
play at this spot. 

Comment: An Official should blow his whistle 
only when he actually sees ball in possession of a 
player who is actually down. 

11. Play: 4th Down-5 on K's 25. K's scrimmage- 
kick is muffed by Rl on R's 30 yard-line after 

(Continued on Page Eleven) 



/\ 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1958 



SEPTEMBER, 1958 VOL. XXI— NO. 2 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60). Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Directors— W. B. Jones, (1957-61) Somerset: W. H. Crowdus 
(1958-62) Franklin: Jack Dawson (1958-62). Louisyille : Robert 
P. Forsythe (195B-69), Greenville: K. G. Gillaspie (1955-59), 
Georgetown: Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



'^rom 



tlie C( 



omynissionei s 



Offi 



ice 



Basketball Clinics 

Charlie Vettiner, veteran basketball clinic direc- 
tor who has sei-ved the Kentucky Hieh School Ath- 
letic Association for many years, will be in charge 
of the 1958-59 rules metings for registered officials 
and coaches. 

The dates and sites of the metings are as fol- 
lows : 

September 28, Gottschalk School, Louisville, 
7:30 P. M. (CDT) 

September 29, Owensboro High School, 1:30 
P. M. (CST) 

September 29, Henderson High School, 7:30 
P. M. (CST) 

September 30, Madisonville High School, 1:30 
P. M. (CST) 

September 30, Mayfield High School, 7:30 P. M. 
(CST) 

October 1, Bowling Greene High School, 1:30 
P. M. (CST) 

October 1, Elizabethtovra High School, 7:30 
P. M. (CST) 

October 5, Somei'set High School, 1:30 P. M. 
(CST) 

October 5, Bell High School. 8:00 P. M. (EST) 

October 6, Hazard High School, 1:30 P. M. 
(CST) 

October 6, Pikeville High School, 8:00 P. M. 
(EST) 

October 7, Morehead State College, 1:30 P. M. 
(CST) 

October 7, Ashland Y.M.C.A.. 8:00 P. M. (EST) 

October 8, Newport High School, 1:30 P. M. 
(EST) 

October 8, University High School, Lexington, 
7:30 P. M. (CDT) 

Football Examination 

Part II of the National Federation Football 
Examination for Officials will be given in Kentucky 
on Monday, October 6. An official who has been 
registered for at least one year prior to the current 
season is eligible to take the examination and work 
for a higher rating. Officials who hold the "ap- 
proved" rating in football are required to make a 
minimum percentage grade of 80 in order to maintain 
this rating from year to year. Officials who hold 
the "certified" rating keep this rating by attending 
one or more clinics each year. Eligible officials who 
wish to take the test should write the state office. 



Use of Registered Officials 

Lists of registered football and basketball of- 
ficials appear in this issue of the ATHLETE. Prin- 
cipals and coaches should study the current lists to 
determine whether or not all officials with whom 
contracts have been signed have registered this fall. 
Supplementary lists of officials will appear in sub- 
sequent issues of the magazine. By-Law 22 provides 
that member schools shall use registered officials in 
all football and basketball games, and the failure 
to comply with this regulation makes the home 
school liable for suspension. If there is any question 
about registration, the official should be asked to 
present his card. 

Delegate Assembly 

Article IV, Section 2-b, of the K.H.S.A.A. Con- 
stitution pi'ovides that members to the Delegate 
Assembly at the annual meting shall be elected by 
the principals of each basketball district on ballots 
distributed by the Commissioner before October 1 
and returned on or before November 15. Delegates 
serve for a period of one year, beginning January 1 
immediately following their election. 



Basketball Tournament Trophies 

Specifications are now being written for the 
trophies which will be used in the 1959 district and 
regional basketball tournaments. Bids will be taken 
by the Trophy Committee during the next few 
weeks. Firms interested in submitting bids on the 
tournament trophies should write to the Commis- 
sioner for information. 

School for Basketball Officials 

The 10th annual School for Basketball Officials 
was held on August 10-11, 1958, at the Phoenix 
Hotel, Lexington. The school was directed by 
State Clinic Director Charlie Vettiner. 

Pictured on the cover of the ATHLETE are the 
officials representing the sixteen basketball regions. 
The areas which they represent are indicated. The 
services of these men will be available to K.H.S.A.A. 
member schools throughout the forthcoming season. 
They will conduct additional clinics for officials, 
coaches, and players, and will assist beginning of- 
ficials in registration. 

In the first session of the school held on the 
afternoon of August 10, the agenda included the 
following: New Rules Changes, General Study of 
the Rules. In the evening session of the same day, 
the discussion covered a complete rules study, and 
officials were drilled on uniform signalling of vio- 
lations. 

The morning session on August 11 was given 
to the study of the Techniques of Officiating in 
Kentucky and Fixing Responsibilities. Items dis- 
cussed were: Floor Technique on Jump Balls, Floor 
Technique on Fouls, Floor Technique on Field Goals, 
How to Determine Primary Responsibility in Charg- 
ing and Blocking Situations, How to Determine 
Primary Responsibility for Contact on Stationary 
Screens, How to Determine Primary Responsibility 
for Moving Screens, Offensive and Defensive Fouls, 
and Technical Fouls on Coaches. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1958 



Page Three 



Clinic For Cheerleaders 

The Kentucky Association of Pep Organi- 
zation Sponsors, in conjunction with the 
University of Kentucky, will sponsor a clinic 
on Saturday, September 20, for cheerleaders 
and their sponsors and for pep club members. 
The site of the clinic will be Alumni Gym of 
the U. K. campus. 

Returning by popular demand to lead the 
clinic will be Lawrence Herkimer, Executive 
Secretary of the National Cheerleaders' As- 
sociation, who presented his very successful 
initial event on the U. K. campus September 
8, 1956. 

Mr.Herkimer will teach every phase of 
cheerleading, such as tumbling stunts that 
may be synchronized with yells, conducting 
pep rallies effectively, effective cheerleader 
routines, composing new yells and chants, 
arousing school spirit, stunts and skits for 
rallies and games, and other phases of cheer- 
leading. 

Cost of the clinic, an all-day affair, is 
$2.00 for each person attending, and partici- 
pants are asked to bring pencil and paper to 
take notes and copy yells, songs, and skits. 
If a squad wishes to perform a cheer before 
the group for demonstration purposes, mem- 
bers are asked to wear uniforms. 

Registration time is 8:30 A. M. at Alumni 
Gym, and the clinic ends at 4 :00 P. M., with 
an hour for lunch from noon until 1:00 P. M. 
The University of Kentucky Athletic Deart- 
ment will entertain official cheerleader spon- 
sors at a luncheon. 

K.A.P.O.S. is fortunate to be able to secure 
the services of Mr. Herkimer, with his busy 
schedule, just at the start of a school vear. 
He has trained over 80,000 high school and 
college yell leaders during the past ten years, 
conducting his special courses in leading 
schools in thirty-eight states. A former 
Southwest A.A.U. tumbling champion, he 
was yell leader at North Dallas High School 
for three years, at Southern Methodist Uni- 
versity for three years, and at the Univer- 
sity of Illinois for one year. 

For those who would like to see the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky-Georeia Tech football 
game, to be played on Stoll Field that night, 
tickets mav be obtained by writing the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky Athletic Department. 

—J. M. 



National Federation Annual 
Meeting 

The 39th annual meeting of the National l<''ed- 
eration of State High School Athletic Associ-.tions 
was held at the Miramar Hotel, Santa Barbara, 
California, on June 22-26, 1958. Forty-one state 
associations, in addition to affiliated associations in 
Hawaii, Ontario, and Saskatchewan were reprecent- 
ed. Forty-eight state executive officers or assis.ant 
executive officers, forty-six state association Board 
of Control officers, and ninety-two additional board 
members attended. Several national associations, in- 
cluding the National Association of Intercollegiate 
Athletics, the National Junior College Athletic As- 
sociation, the American Junior Bowling Congress, 
the U. S. Olympic Association, the American As- 
sociation for Health, Physical Education and Recrea- 
tion, and the Major and Minor Baseball Leagues 
were represented. The total individual attendance 
was 538. 

Kentucky was represented by K.H.S.A.A. Vice- 
President Louis Litchfield; Directors W. H. Crow- 
dus, Robert P. Forsythe, K. G. Gillaspie, W. B. 
Jones, and Cecil A. Thornton; Commissioner Theo. 
A. Sanford; and Assistant Commissioner J. B. 
Mansfield. 

The District of Columbia Interscholastic Ath- 
letic Division was officially accepted as a member 
of the National Federation. Supervising Director 
Hardy L. Pearce, was present and participated in 
the program. Hawaii was represented by Secretary 
Alvin Chang, Principal Charles Clark and Principal 
Clarence N. Watson. Saskatchewan, Canada, was 
represented by Phil Dynan, and Ontario, Canada, by 
T. Stewart Scott. State School Boards were repre- 
sented by Clarence Cox (Kansas) and R. A. Horton 
(Minnesota). 

The opening- session included an impressive 
ceremony conducted by Secretary Albert Willis 
(Illinois) in memory of five prominent State As- 
sociation of National Federation officers who had 
passed away during the preceding year. They were 
C. W. Whitten, pioneer in National Federation or- 
g-anization and its first Secretary; P. F. Neverman, 
first Executive Secretary of the Wisconsin Inter- 
scholactic Athletic Association, org'anizer of the 
first State Association-sponsored athletic accident 
insurance program and influential participant in 
National Federation activity; George Mills and 
Willis Bates, pioneer officers of the Michigan High 
School Athletic Association; I. E. Ewing, one of the 
organizers and first Executive Officer of the West 
Virginia Secondary School Activities Association; 
and T. Homer Thompson of the Coca-Cola Company. 

Citation certificates were presented in a pro- 
gram arranged by the Citations Committee. Those 
cited were: Fred L. Blester (Illinois), W. L. Colvin 
(Louisiana), J. T. Giles (Indiana), Cyril H. Han- 
cock (Montana), L. T. Havig (North Dakota), 
Hiram W. Jennings (California), C. 0. Jett (Ten- 
nessee), Frank Kendall (Alabama), Kenneth E. 
Smith (New York), Harry P. Sawin (Ohio), and 
W. C. Whaley (West Virginia). In connection with 
the citations, glowing tribute was paid to three 
veterans who have announced their retirement to 
take effect within the next few months. These were: 
H. W. Emswiler, Commissioner of the Ohio High 
School Athletic Association; W. B. Kenna, retired 
(Continued on Page Twelve) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1958 



The Flying Dutchman 

There is something fresh about fall and 
a new athletic year which the season ushers 
in. Athletics keep us young with a newness 
which we know will be ever present as one 
season of sports follows another. So it is 
that as the autumn breezes blow open the 
school doors all over Kentucky and boys 
reach for their gridiron togs, all of us live 
again our own football days. 

Regardless of the school boy sport involved 
Kentucky's athletic program has always led 
the way because the Commissioner has fol- 
lowed the sound philosophy that to have 
good athletic contests we must also have 
good officiating. Kentucky's schools for 
basketball officials held in Lexington in 
August and the clinics conducted in the six- 
teen regions in September and October do 
much toward bringing about the uniformity 
of officiating for which Kentucky is well 
known. These also develop sound athletic 
friendships between officials, coaches, and 
school administrators. This year's School 
For Officials found Bill Nau of Barbourville 
representing Region 13 for the first time and 
contributing much toward the success of the 
1958 get-together. 

Officials from the sixteen regions studied 
for two days under the direction of the Fly- 
ing Dutchman who was advised and coun- 
seled by the indefatigable assistant commis- 
sioner, Joe Billy Mansfield. These sixteen 
men are outstanding in the field of basket- 
ball officiating and they are also outstand- 
ing as fine gentlemen. 

Golf took over as recreation while the 
school was not in session. Several foursomes 
were on the Boiling Sorings Country Club 
course matching shots. The Dutchman team- 
ed up with Dave Longenecker to vie with 
Owensboro's Roy Settle and Murray's Rex 
Alexander. Few people will believe this but 
Rex, Roy, and Dave will vouch for the fact 
that the Dutchman missed a hole in one by 
only an inch and three Quarters. Our of- 
ficials presented two of the best golfers to 
be found anywhere. An ideal match which 
could be arranged would pit Shelbyville's 
Evan Settle against Owensboro's Roy Settle. 
Both are Par-Busters. 

While Joe Billy was presiding over the 
school in Lexington, Commissioner Ted had 
"hit the road" with Edg-ar McNabb who was 
conducting football clinics in Eastern Ken- 
tucky. The basketball clinics this year start 




The Dutchman 

on September 28 in Louisville and continue 
through October 8 with the last session 
scheduled at Lexington. Each of the clinics is 
expected to present a record attendance since 
both officials and coaches are now required 
to be in attendance. 

A milestone has been passed in high 
school athletics in our country with the 
resignation of H. V. Porter as executive sec- 
retary of the National Federation of State 
High School Athletic Association. H. V. 
Porter has served for countless years as the 
secretary of the National Basketball Rules 
Committee of the United States and Canada, 
and has been the national interpreter of 
rules for high schools. The Dutchman never 
had a finer friend than Mr. Porter, and the 
high schools of the nation will never be able 
to fully appreciate the tremendous service 
this leader gave. As H. V. vacates his office 
at 7 South Dearborn Street in Chicago the 
Flying Dutchman pauses to salute a fine 
leader, a great man and a humanitarian who 
has left his footprints in the sands of time. 

Succeeding Mr. Porter in one of the big- 
gest jobs in the country is an alert and keen 
minded young man answering to the name 
of Cliff Fagan. Cliff was formerly Commis- 
sioner of the Wisconsin High School Athletic 
Association. In the short time that Cliff 
Fagan has spent in Kentucky he has made 
friends by the minute. He is the kind of 
fellow who can quickly size up a situation 
and render a speedy accurate decision. The 
National Federation could not have found a 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1958 



Page Five 



better replacement than Cliff. People like to 
cooperate with him. 

Because of the service Cliff has rendered 
to his Kentucky friends and because of the 
friendly feeling Kentucky has for him, Hon- 
orable A. B. Chandler, Governor of Ken- 
tucky, has commissioned him a Kentucky 
Colonel. So it is that Colonel Cliff Fagan 
now becomes head of the National Federation 
of High School Athletic Association and rules 
interpreter for the secondary schools of the 
nation. 

The first Corn Cob Pipe of the 1958-59 
athletic year goes to Orba Traylor, Commis- 
sioner of Finance for the Commonwealth of 
Kentucky. The handsome race horse with 
the Corn Cob Pipe adorning its neck is now 
on its way to him in Frankfort. This award 
goes to people rendering unselfish service 
and carries the following citation to Commis- 
sioner Traylor: "Presented in recognition of 
unselfish service to people all over the 
Commonwealth." Orba, who hails from 
Western Kentucky, has given freely of him- 
self to young and old alike and richly quali- 
fies for the Corn Cob Pipe of honor award. 

As the first Corn Cob Pipe goes out to a 
Kentuckian, the Dutchman reminds you that 
your recommendations of fellow Kentuckians 
who have rendered services with no thought 
of personal gain may name other Corn Cob 
Pipe winners. Remember also to adopt the 
physically handicapped boy as your game 
guy. Don't forget to recommend those com- 
munities for the Abou Ben Adam award for 
good neighborly practice. I'll see you at the 
clinics. 



Reg 



istered Football Officials 

of The K. H. S. A. A.— 1958 

(List Compiled September 1) 



If one telephone number is griven for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the heme phone. 

Abele, George F.. 240 Taylor Dr.. Lexington, 28122 

AUmon. Raymond T. "Honev", 108 Arta Dr., Madison, Tenn., 

7-6075, Chadwell School 
Almon, James H., 187 1st., Lynch. Vi 5942 

Alston, E. Deedom, 1016 S. 43rd, Louisville, Sp 2-1092, Ju 7-6129 
Anderson, Everett W.. Jr., 604 Highland. Mavfield, 1927, 71 
Attick, Capt. William E., USAARMS, Ft. Knox, Ext. 6627, 

(Bus. No. I 
Autore, Daniel. Wheelwright, 2362 
Bach, Leonard. 3137 No. Bend Rd., Cincinnati 39, Ohio, 

Mu 1-1515, Mu 1-1515 
Ball, Al, 306 Monroe St.. South Charleston, W. Va., Ri 4-9847, 

Ri 4-2278 
Ballard, Robert A., Route 3. Shelbyville, 1490, 152 
Barbour, Morris, 440 Wilberforce Ct.. Louisville 3 
Barlow, Billy B., Route 5, Paris, 1095 W 
Barlow. Bob, Highland Ave., Georgetown, 894 
Barlow James L., 282 So. Ashland, Lexington, 4-9287, 2-5858 
Bartels, John T., 423 Third. Dayton, Ju 1-4250, He 1-9088 
Baskin, Sylvester, 214 West St., Box 1056, Lynch, Vi 8-5637 
Beck, C. Norman, 2588 Filson Ave., Louisville 17, Me 4-1737, 

Ju 2-3511 
Bell, Clarence T., 1228 So. 41st Street, Louisville 11, Sp 8-7792. 

Ju 4-1361, Ext. 7122 
Bennett, Howard "Pete". Route 4, Mayfield, 1754 J, 1420 
Berry, William, 1229 2nd, Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 36765 



Blackburn, Adrian, Prestonsburg, 2401 

Blanton. Homer, 711 Bellefonte-Princess Rd., Ashland, East 

4-1730, East 4-3730 

Boeh, Bill, 3804 MacNicholas, Deer Park 36, Ohio, Sy 1-8880, 

Po 1-1876 
Boeing, Charles F., 3959 Delmar Ave., Cincinnati 11, Ohio, 

Mo 1-7032, Mu 1-6300 
Bohanon, J. B., 2226 Madison, Paducah. 28149 
Bonner, John C, 5335 Buckner Ave., Louisville 14, Em 8-2222, 

Em 3-9902 
Bostick, Lord M.. Jr., 419 W. 12th, Bowling Green, Vi 3-3319, 

Vi 3-3319 
Bowman, Earl G., "Dick", 689 Mt. Vernon Dr., Lexington, 

5-0473, 2-3343 
Boyles, Jerry, 3200 Park, Ashland, 46995, 41111 
Brandenburg, Donald E., 714 Exeter Ave., Middlesboro. 1139 
Brichler, Joe A., 5737 Kiefer Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, Ki 1-6049, 

Pa 1-1984 
Brizendine, Vic, 2711 Lakeside Dr., Louisville 5, Gl 4-6843, 

Ju 7-9111 
Brotzge, Maurice J., 3800 W. Broadway, Louisville, Sp 6-2506, 

Sp 6-2506 
Brown, George W., 1725 Quarry Hill Rd., Louisville, Gl 8-4857, 

Ju 4-1361, Ext. 477 
Brown, John W., 525 E. N. Aspendale. Lexington, 5-0859, 

2-3212 
Burke, Dan, 115 Maureen, Cincinnati, Ohio, Gr 1-9631, Ch 1-7411 
Byrd, Harry G., 7331 North Timberlane Dr., Madeira, Cincinnati 

43, Ohio, Locust 1-8745, Locust 1-8745 
Cain, Paul D., "Chip", Jr., 1215 Corbett Ave., Cincinnati. Ohio, 

Ea 1-7246, Av 1-9740 
Caiman, E. C, Jr., 1124 Washington, Sturgis, 2100, 3545 
Campbell, John J., Route 5, Fulton, 1773, 130 
Campbell, William C.. 7602 Rosemary Lane, Louisville 14, 

Wa 1-9052, Em 6-9561, Ext. 437 
Canter, John, 1809 Shady Lane, Apt. 1, Louisville, Hi 7281 M, 

Ju 7-8862 
Carlson. David A., 2916 Washington St., Paducah. 5-7943 
Carroll, Thomas J., 1725 Devondale Dr., Louisville, Tw 5-8478, 

Em 3-3582 
Caruso, J. T., 123 Oak St., Norton. Virginia 154 410 
Cassada Ed., 1003 S. St. James, Evansville, Ind., Gr 7-3412, 

Gr 7-4292 
Cathey, Gene S., 1415 Vine St., Murray, 1986-R, 1408 
Cawood, Hobert Guy, Cumberland Ave., Middlesboro, 729, 365 
Cecil, A. Morris, 14 Shaw Lane, Ft. Thomas, Hi 1-8427, 

Ch 1-2582 
Cisco, Robert A., 516 Oakhurst Ave., Hazard, 1235, 126 
Clark, Owen B., Route 6, Lexington 

Clagg, Harry G., 1336 13th Street, Huntington, W. Va. 
Clinard, Fred L., Snow Ave., Madison, Tenn., 7-2437, Al 6-7235 
Combs, Travis, 510 N. Main, Somerset, 1239, 143 
Coudret, Raymond J. Jr., 2243 E. Iowa, Evansville, Ind., 

Gr 7-4259, Ha 5-3339 
Grace, James, Route 2, Box 373, St. Albins, W. Va., Pa 7-4779, 

Po 8-3911 
Craft, Bill, 638 Longview Dr., Lexington, 2-4843, 5-0160 
Creasey, Fred. 204 W. Washington, Sebree 

Creekmore, Lester, 313 Center, Bellevue, Ju 1-2524, He 1-9972 
Crosthwaite, John S., Jr., Box 236, Big Stone Gap, Va., 104 

(Bus. No.) 
Crouch, Jack J., 463 Villa Dr., Evansville, Ind., Gr 6-4892 
Crum, Edward E., 3242 Greendale Dr., Louisville 16, Sp 8-6067 
Gulp, Capt. Willard E., Hqts. 326 Eng. Bn., Abw Div., Ft. 

Campbell, 4048, 4494 
Cummins, Josh, 2139 Memorial Pkwy., Ft. Thomas. Hi 1-1679, 

Po 1-4100, Ext. 1771 
Current, Ellis Ray, 670 Springridge Dr., Lexington, 7-1049, 

5-4660 
Dallmann, James W., 12 Center St., Jeffersonville, Ind., 

Bu 3-7255 
Daniels, Robert M., 36 Highland Ave., Prestonsburg, 7761 
Davis, William P., 1003 8th St., Huntington, W. Va. 
DeMuth, Paul E., 2242 Thistledawn Dr., Louisville, Em 6-4354, 

Ju 7-9136 
Denton, Charles M., 1427 Clay, Henderson, Va 6-4020, Va 6-3195 
Derrington, Robert, 4715 Lakeview Dr., Evansville, Ind., 

Wo 3-5133, Ha 4-6441 
Dial, Jack W., 26th Street, Huntington, W. Va. 
DiMuzio, Robert M.. 6422 Golfway Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Ki 1-2220. Wa 1-1180 
Dixon, Charles Thomas, P. 0. Box 209. Eastern State College, 

Richmond. 247 Carlisle Keith Hall EKSC, Richmond 
Dolan, Richard J., 5111 Emerald Dr., Louisville, Wo 9-7239, 

Bu 3-6611, Ext. 239. Jeffersonville, Ind. 
Dotson, W. S., 432 E. 6th Street, Lexington. 2-5131, 4-0350 
Duke, Jesse W., 8422 Staghorn, Louisville. Tw 5-7321, Ju 3-3871 
Durkin, Jack H., 240 Hillsboro, Lexington. 4-4396, 4-1717 
Edelen, Ben R., 3309 Wellingmoor, Louisville, Gl 4-3618, 

Gl 2-2611 
Ellspermann, George, 1305 S. Ruston, Evansville, Ind., Gr 6-6693, 

Ha 4-7741, Ext. 607 
Engle, Orville, 128 Oak St., Pineville, 7-2916 
Ernst, Ray C, 3574 Larkspur Dr., Cincinnati 8, Ohio, East 

1-6758, Dunbar 1-2200, Ext. 696 
Enssiin, Thomas F. 260 Somerset, Stanford, 2484 
Falls, William M., 122 Liberty Street, Hopkinsville, Tu 6-2436, 

Tu 6-8278 



Pcge Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1958 



Faust, John (Jack), 2427 Concord Dr., Louisville, Me 7-2043 
Fey, Alien, 123 Garden Way, Ft. Thomas, Hi 1-6288, Hi 1-1800, 

Ext. 1345 
Fitch, F. A., 156 Wilson Ct., Huntington, W. Va. 
Fitchko, Bill, Norton, Virginia, 466-W, 602 or 564 
Fletcher, John L., 4143 I, Ft. Knox, Wl 2-2511, 2348 
Florence, Kobert H., 2722 Trimble St., Paducah, 5-7489, 5-6311, 

Ext. 676 
Forbes, John W. (Jack), 208 Granvil Dr., Louisville, GL 46025, 

SP 82731 
Fortney, Robert Lee, 2817 Breckinridge Lane, Louisville, 

Gl 8-1079, Ju 2-3611, Ext. 474 
Fostei', Berryman E., 927 Waverly Dr., Lexington, 3-1827, 

2-0515 
Fraley, Bill, 1604 Lee Dr., Henderson, 7-9410 
Freese, Oliver "T"., 6965 Euclid Rd., Cincinnati 43, Ohio, 

Tw 1-4041, He 1-2295 
Fugate, E. Hugn, Price, McDowell, 2911, Prestonsburg 6261 
Funkhouser, Koy A., General Delivery, Ft. Campbell, 2128 

(Bus. No.) 
Gammon, William H., 908 Highland, Ashland, East 4-6519, 

East 4-1111, Ext. 708 
Gettler, John F., 705 Providence Ed., Lexington, 28845, 26494 
Godbey, Edsel, 662 Maxwellton Ct., Lexington, 5-0986, 2-2200, 

Ext. 2253 
Golden, Billy Joe, 568 E. Main, Box 451, Lynch, Vi 8-2512 
Grace, Charles K., Cypress Street, Pineville, Edgewood 7-3331, 

Edgewood 7-2392 
Grady, Clarence O., 430 No. Main, Marion, 96, 60 
Graham, James Edward, 2601 Elm St., Ashland, 4-8169 
Greene, Omar Paul, 3903 Glen Ave., Covington, Ju 1-1706, Dun- 
bar 1-330D, Ext. 330 
Gruneisen, Sam J., 1101 Samuel St., Louisville, Me 4-9964, 

Me 6-6391 
Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 942 Wolfrun Ed., Lexington, 5-5332, 

2-7866 
Hagan, Joseph "Red", 3000 Sherbrooke Rd., Louisville, Gl 8-1326, 

Seneca High School 
Hagerman, Bart, 715 Magnolia Ave., Bowling Green, Vi 2-7865, 

Vi 3-8313 
Hall, Frank P., 2828 Clay, Paducah, 2-3073, 2-1627 
Hanes, Edward C, 1508 Ridgeerest, Bowling Green, Vi 3-3432, 

Vi 3-4782 
Harris, Gene, 201 Riverside Dr., Eussell, 822 
Harrod, Eobert Leslie, 129 Camden Ave.. Versailles, 1004 M, 710 
Hartig, Malcolm W., 2329 E. 111., Evansville, Ind. GE 6-7242, 

HA 3-1051 
Hartley, William E., 1121 Marshall, Evansville, Ind., Or 7-0631, 

Gr 7-0631 
Hatfield, Gene E., 202 Taylor St., Fulton, 1274, Tu 5-5241, 

Union City, Tennessee 
Hawkins, Ealph B„ 661 E. Broadway, Madisonville, Ta 1-7788, 

Ta 1-7603 
Hawkins, Eobert W., Echo Lane, Madisonville, Ta 1-6188, 

Ta 1-2990 
Heinold, Jack, 5739 Wielert, Cincinnati 39, Ohio, Li 2-1431, 

Ma 1-1901 
Heinze, Frank, 204 Maple Ave., Prestonsburg, 2436 
Heinze, John G., 39 Highland Ave., Prestonsburg, 2195 
Hellard, George D., Jr., 672 Longview, Lexington, 7-2543, 3-0484 
Hewling. Richard, 211 Linden Ave., Newport, Ax 1-2299, 

Me 1-0010 
Hodge, Don Robert, 1012 S. E. 2nd St., Evansville, Ind., 

Ha 3-2436 
Hoferer, Louis R., 420 McClelland, Cincinnati, Ohio, Ca 1-3022, 

Wa 1-9841 
Holbrook, William, 2421 Forest Ave., Ashland, Ea 4-2144, 

Ea 4-5850 
Holeman, D. Fletcher, 329 Poplar, Dawson Springs, Sw 7-2302, 

Sw 7-4241 
Holman, S. T., 3 Gilliam, Corbin, 1742-M, 283 
Howerton, Jack, Jr., 3620 Lexington Rd., Louisville 7, 

CH 5-8456,, TW 5-0781 
Huff, Carl E., Jr., 4207 Longfield Dr., Evansville, Ind., 

Ha 2-7234, Ha 5-1011, Ext. 246 
Huiet, Fred "Whitey", 7327 Osceola Dr., Madeira, Ohio, 

Locust 1-9239, Ch 1-4768 
Isaac, John K., 705 Ellette Dr., Charleston, W. Va. 
Janning Eobert L., 151 Pleasant Ridge, Ft. Mitchell, Ed 1-3538, 

Ki 1-2142 
Jenkins, Kean, 210 Morningside, Elizabethtown, EC 6-4087, 

EG 5-4606 
Johnson, Bernard M., 322 Blueberry Lane, Lexington, 7-2883, 

22200, E.xt. 2324 
Jones, Bill, 6207 Pine Dr., Huntington, W. Va. 
Jones, Edward B. Ill, USATCA Special Services, Ft. Knox, 

Ft. Knox 6433, Ft. Knox 2955 
Jones, J. Carl, 1003 Kentucky St., Corbin, 1820, 306 
Josephs, Michael, 326 S. Walnut St., Huntington, W. Va. 
Kathman. Bernie, 3060 Elmwood Dr., S. Ft. Mitchell, Di 1-7360, 

Ma 1-7541 
Kemper Euss, 5732 Lauderdale, Cincinnati 39, Ohio, WE 1-6222, 

MA 1-4380 
Kerr, Kenneth, 814 Brookline, Louisville, EM 8-0813, JU 6-4000 
King, Allen V., 424 N. Brady, Morganfield, 532 W, 2 
Kraesig, Charles F., 3851 C Fincastle, Louisville, GL 8-4969 
Kyle, Leslie G., Jr., 25 Chalfonte PI., Ft. Thomas, Hi 1-8601, 

Ki 1-2622 
Lacey, Cecil E., Mullens, W. Va. 



Lamb, Billy J., E. 2, Danville, J. C. 3950 

Lanahan, Thomas F., 3107 Doreen Way, Louisville, Gl 8-4490, 

Ju 4-9063 
Lawrence. Eichard D., 4750 B Prichard PL, Fort. Knox, 

WJ 2-2175, 6936 
Lawson, Leland, 949 DePorres, Lexington, 41009, 23044 
Lee, Charles J., 315 Scott St., Lexington, 2-3003 
Levicki, A. P., 340 Oak Ave., Norton, Va., 556, 654 
Lewis, Jesse, 258 Ky. St., Huntington W. Va. 
Lohr, Joel D., 3124 Redbud Ln., Louisville, Gl 8-3386, Tw 5-3401, 

Ext. 226 
Longenecker, David M., 3910 Olympic, Louisville, Tw 69071, 

Tw 53401, Ext. 301-2 
Lowe, Eugene T., 107 Ford, London, Eo 45724, Ro 42207 
Lowe, Stanford, Brookheaven, P. O. Box 337, Eussellville, 

Pa 6-6647, Nashville, Tenn., Cy 7-6621 
Lucas, Gene T., 412 Clayton Ave., Georgetown, 1371, 19 
McClaskey, Booker, Boston, Te 3-4725, Ft. Knox 4916 
McColium, Robert G., 406 Holiday Ed., Lexington, 2-3710, 2-2220 
McCowan, Connell, E. 1, Box 261, Corbin, 2361 
McDade, C. F. "Mickey", 918 6th Ave., St. Albans, W. Va. 
McHenry, Louis P., 408y, S. Main St., Hopkinsville, Tu 6-2601, 

Tu 6-2813 
McKown, C. H. "Jackie", 127 Roanoke Circle, Wayne, W. Va. 
McNabb, Edgar, 137 Pleasant Eidge, So. Ft. Mitchell, Ed 1-3113, 

Ed 1-1220 
McTigue, Joe, 647 Eastlawn, Louisville, Sp 6-6120 
Makepeace, William H., Jr., 922 Edwards Ed., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

East 1-4042 East 1-4042 
Martin, Bill, 153 Clay, Erlanger, Di 1-8472, Ma 1-0130 Service 

Dept. 
Matarazzo, Sal, 320 N. Mulberry, Elizabethtown, EO 5-6689, 

Mathis, Curtis, 109 3rd St., Harlan, 702, 2620 

May, E. B., Jr., Box 186, Prestonsburg 2314, 7661 

Mayhew, Happy, Barvourville, 619-L 

Mayhugh, Robert L., Cherrywood Dr., Elizabethtown, 5-9298, 

5-6187 
Mayo, Henry L., Paintsville, 866, 29 or 30 
Meeks, Jack, 407 5th St., Corbin, 415, 661 

Mercke, Frank, 417 Lotis Way, Louisville, Tw 6-8460, Me 4-9491 
Meyer, Bud, 6319 Lilibet Ct., Cincinnati 38, Ohio, Bl 1-3459, 

Pa 1-4334 
Millerhaus, Bill, 923 Harris, Cincinnati 5, Ohio, Gr 1-7904, 

Wa 1-9722 
Mitchell, Emmett, 284 Taylor Dr., Lexington, 5-2480, 4-4254 
Mitchell, Vyron W., 901 Walnut St., Fulton, 1648, 30 
Moellering, Louis H., 6287 Lilbur Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Be 1-8701, Mu 1-3510 
Moran, W. C, 3104 Horton Ave., Louisville 5, Gl 8-6178, 

Sp 2-3661 
Mordica, William, 800 Edgewood, Ashland, East 4-7741 
Moss, Howard A., Box 1042, Paducah, 3-1072, 2-4474 
Moss, James W., 418 Lafayette Ave., Lexington, 6-3636, 4-2015 
Mullins, B. E., Paintsville, 432, 545 
Munson C. D., 1934 Harper Rd., Beckley, W. Va. 
Muntan, Peter J., 125 Woodmore Ave., Louisville 14, Em 8-8236, 

Me 7-7621 
Mussman, Ralph, Jr., 502 Monroe, Newport, Ju 1-4662, Co 1-3120 
Nau, Bill, Barbourville, 203, 317 
Neal, Gene, 549 Washington, New Richmond, Ohio, Ri 2-6751, 

Av 1-4630 
Noland, Douglas, Herndon Ave., Stanford, 2609, 2619 
Nord, Ed., 1734 So. 23rd, Louisville, Sp 4-1958, Tw 5-3410, 

Ext. 202 
Omer, Billy W., R. R. 5, Madisonville, Ta 1-2833 
O'Neal, Bud, 1757 Harvard Dr., Louisville 6, Gl 8-7940 
Osborne, Ted, Box 806, Lexington, 4-6270 
Overby, H. E., 1913 11th Ave. N., Nashville, Tenn., Al 6-1310, 

Cy 2-2493 & Am 9-3516 
Palmer, Carl A., 2506 So. 7th Street, Ironton, Ohio, 4171 
Parker. Billie E., P. O. Box 731, Pineville, Edgewood 7-3293 
Parsley, Clyde E., Route 2, Providence, MO 7-2524, TA 1-9004 
Patrick, Charles C Route 2, Lexington, 4-4516, 4-4516 
Peeno, Harry E.. 422 Oak St., Ludlow, Ju 17335 
Perdue, Paul, 623 Broad St., Murray 
Perkins, Billy, E. E. 1, Gerogetown, 438 
Perry, Alfred L., 321 Meadow Ln., Elizabethtown, Eo 5-7735, 

Ft. Knox 2140 & 2149 
Perry. L. J., 438 South, Lynch, Vi 8-5941 
Pickarts, John M.. 4752 C Prichard Place, Fort Knox, Wi 

2-3804, 6637 
Poore, William E., P. O. Box 448, Hazard, Park 851, 824 
Pursifull, Cleophus, Box 1, Loyall, 1110, Pineville Edgewood 

7-2329 
Powell, Logan, 416 Woodland, Lexington, 6-1653 
Qualey, Lawrence V., NAVY No. 824, Box 26, c/o Fleet Post 

Office, San Francisco, Calif. 
Eaisor, J. T., 990 Frederickburg Ed., Lexington, 7-1043, 4-0304 
Reddington, James T., 3824 Glenside PL, Louisville 13, c/o Camp 

Taylor P. O., Gl 2-9689 
Eeece, Fred, 149 Elm, Versailles, 33, Paris 1465 
Eeed, Gordon (Moe), 22 Riverside Parkway, Ft. Thomas, 

Hi 14946 Du 14507 
Reinhart, Gene A., 4813 Sweetser, Evansville 15, Ind., Gr 7-3919 
Riddle, Maurice G., 177 Eucker Ave., Georgetown, 1884, 22220, 

Ext. 2238 
Eocke. James M., 10 Lewis Circle, Erlanger 
Eiggs, William T., 28 Congress Dr., Morganfield, 690, 9168 or 868 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1958 



Page Seven 



Rolph, Harold J., 915 S. 7th St., Ironton, Ohio, 20B9 R, 1390 
Russell, Charles, Jr., 61 Main, Box 627, Lynch, Vi 8-2301 
Russell, Joe, Orchard Dr., Russellville, Pa 6-6983, Pa 6-69S3 
Rutledge, Pete, 501 N. 2nd Street, Murray 
Sabato, Al, 7621 View PI. Dr., Cincinnati 24, Ohio, Va 1-3646, 

Pa 1-1052 
Sacra, Gresham, 920 Darley Dr., Lexington, 2-2220, Ext. 3217, 

(Bus. No.) 
Sauter, Harold S., 1227 Crown Ave., Louisville 4, Hi 5-512J, 

Em 8-3381, Ext. 268 
Saylor, Ben H., 312 Van Dorn, Corbin, 2187 
Sayior, Deward, Box 407, Wallins Creek, Mo 4-3594 
Saylor, Emanuel, Box 265, Loyall, 1140, 2620 
Scnartenberger, Irv T., '(267 Jetnve Ln., Cincinnati 43, Ohio, 

Lo 1-6378, Lo 1-6378 
Schmitt, K. F., 204 Southern Trust Bldg., Louisville 
Schneider, Duke, 341 Bonnie Leislie, Beilevue, St 1-1939, 

St 1-1939 
Scott, Luther, 211 Spruce St., Murray, 1665 
Scott, W. L., 1816 McDonald Rd., Lexington, 23316, 43663 
Sculipn Mujor Allan K., Reception Station, It. Knox, 2048, 3458 
Seaie, Frank E., luOl Tates Creek Rd., Le.xington, 5-5028 
,Snaw, Jonn H., 219 E. Lee St., Mayfield, 1435 
Shaw, Stanley E., 4460 W. 8th St., Cincinnati 38, Ohio, 

Gr 1-1100, Mo 1-3510 
Showalter, John W., Georgetown 
Hnumate, Roy V.. Benham, Vl 8-2538, Vi 8-5406 
Sinims, Wavelan J., Jr., Co. B Spec. Tng. Regt USATCA, Ft, 

Knox, 6033, 6U33 
Sinclair, George H., 5120 Lammers Lane, LKjuisville, Wo 9-7925. 

Me 7-V621, Line 346 
Sizemore, Dewey, 157 Cedra, P. O. Box 65, Hazard, 513, 3300 
Skinner, Earnest, 206 Pine, Murray 
Sledd T., 712 Poplar, Murray, 219, 740, Line 206 
Sloan, Wallace, 419 Oread Rd., Louisville, Xw 51126, Tw 72554 
Smith, Edgar J., 3904 Farmview, Louisville 18, Gl 8-1286 
Smith, Walter K., 1709 Harvard Dr., Louisville, Gl 2-9476, 

Ju 7-9201 
Snider, Louis G., 3021 Debera Way, Louisville 18, Gl 8-5248, 

Gl 4-7511, Ext. 2825 
Stephenson, B. H., 331 Taylor Dr., Lexington, 2-7970 
Stevens, William D., 418 Culpepper, Lexington, 5-1071, 2-2220, 

Ext. 3122 
Stewart, Herbert T., Locust 34, Lothair, High 89 
Strong, Arnett, 425 Cedar, Hazard, No. 389, Main 33000 
Sullivan, Don C, Mayo Addn., Prestonsburg, 2197, 2371 
Swope, William, 406 Breckinridge, Lexington, 5-2648 
Taylor, James R., 425 Robertson, Lexington, 2-8562 
Teague, Amos, Homewood Dr., Madisonville, Ta 1-4639, Ta 1-6333 
Thompson Jack, 2347 Saratoga Dr., Louisville, Gl 2-9255 
Thompson, Jack, Jr., 1310 Rammers, Louisville, Me 4-3517, 

Ju 4-5311 
Thompson, Paul, 3626 Wyndham Court, Ashland, East 4-8639, 

Catlettsburg 95 
Tho.-npson, Ralph, 649 Ivy Hill Dr., Cincinnati 38. Ohio, 

Bl 1-5394, Wa 1-0047 
Thurman, J. W., 108 Town Sq., Manchester, Ly 8-2811, Ly 8-2737 
Timmering, George E., 1741 Boiling Ave., Louisville, Sp 6-0309 
Treas, Joe W., 609 Green St., Fulton, 1056, 41 
Troutman, Doyle, Harlan, 1937, 622 
VanKirk Alvia S., 107 So. Poplar. Corbin, 1546, 146 
Van Meter, David G., 3148 Talisman Rd., Louisville 5, Gl 4-4030 
Van Meter, John William, Jr., 1933 Olive, Louisville. Sp 8-6032. 

Ju 7-6656 
Varner, Ray G., 1002 Birch Drive, Lexington, 2-5434, 5-4224, 

Sta. 210 
Vennari, Paul, Box 13, Beckley, W. Va. 

Waide, Harry, 510 Church, Providence, Mo 7-2055, Mo 7-2421 
Waldrop, Douglas Samuel, Park City. Sh 92196 
Walker. Paul R.. 626 Meadowlawn, Bowling Green, Victor 

3-8893. Victor 3-8326 
Waller. Carlton D.. 716 Delhi. Cincinnati, Ohio, Gr 19510 
Wanchic, Nicholas, USPH Hospital, Lexington, 21750, 28328 
Wash, Johnnie, 1806 Beacon Hill, Lexington, 5-2474, 3-0484 
Watts, Shirley R., 802 Carneal Rd., Lexington, 62743, 25494 
Weber, Walter W., 338 Anderson Ferry Rd., Delhi Hills 38, 

Ohio, BI 1-0161 
Welch, Thomas P., 3932 Vine Vista PI., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Av 1-8094, Ga 1-5700, E.xt. 371 
Wells, Milford, 344 Bays Ave., Morehead, 1054, 455 R 
Werkowitz, Jack, 4614 Miller, Blue Ash 42, Ohio, Sy 1-6382, 

Sy 1-5382 
Whedbee, Melville, 1301 So. 32nd, Louisville, Sp 8-0465 
Wigginton, Al, Sr., 1037 Cecil Ave., Louisville, Sp 6-7881, 

Sp 6-7881 
Williams, Bert O., 668 Ohio Street, Lexington, 4-0057, 2-2626 
Williams, Reid V., Mt. Hermon 
Williams, Roy E., Deepwood Dr., Rt. 3, Elizabethtown, Ro 

6-4831, Ro 6-9169 
Wilson, Jack R., 2220 Sharon Rd., Ashland, EAst 4-1234, 

EAst 5-1611 
Wilson John Pope, 812 E. Main, Louisville 6, Ju 5-4591, 

Tu 6-0211 
Winfrey, Shelby, 8 Holly St.. Berea. 805. 860 
Womack, William H., 1131 Burris, Henderson, Va. 6-9780 
Wurtz, Emil, 18 E. 4th St., Cincinnati, Ohio, Gr 1-0526, 

Du 1-1232 



Registered Basketball Officials 

of The K. H. S. A. A.— 1958-1959 

(List Compiled September 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Able. Forest. 4616 So. 2nd. Louisville 14. Em 6-6077 

Adkins. Alec K., Box 4S4, Pikeville, Ge 7-73U (Bus. No.) 

Adkins, Raymond C, 1526 Beverly Blvd., Ashland, Ea 4-7229 

Akins, Charlie, White Mills, TO 2-1911 

Akridge, Dean. 110 Clark St.. Marion, 504-R 

Alexander, Rex E.. College Station, Murray, 1292, 740, Ext. 215 

Allen, Bill, College Station, Murray 

Allen, Glenn R., College Station, Murray 

Allen, Lowry R., 316 So. Jefferson. Princeton 6276, 2033 

Allen, Nelson R., Morehead St. College, Morehead, 9107 

Almon, James H., 187 1st, Lynch, Vi 6942 

Alwes, Donald R., R. R. 2, Valley Station, We 76348 

Arington, William Robert, College Station, P. O. Box 373, 

Murray 
Armstrong, Thomas R., Route 2, Murray. 663W 
Arnold. Kenneth. Box 658 Seatonville Rd.. Fern Creek. Ce 9-5445, 

Ce 9-3267 
Ashby, Carl C, Box 356. Elktou CO 5-2262 
Ashbrook. William E.. 106 Desha, Lexington, 2-6328 
Ashley, Kenneth, Eubank, 2604, 2604 

Back, Adrian G., Jr., Hodgenville. El 8-3866, EI 8-3474 
Bailey Arville, Flat Gap 

Baird, Bill, First St., Box 978, Harlan, 678, 53 
Baker, Charles T., Richmond, 2707 W 
Baker James E., 2426 Main St., Ashland. East 4-5457. East 

4-3877 
Baker, Morris, Deimer 

Bankemper, Thomas, 1031 Rork St., Newport, Co 10593 
Barker, Donald, Augusta High School, Augusta 
Barker, Walter D., R. R. 5. Portsmouth, Ohio, Ul 8-2770. 

El 3-4840 
Barry. Harold, Route 1, Elizabethtown, UL 4-2275 
Barry, Michael J., 1020 25th, Portsmouth, Ohio, El 3-6809, 

El 3-6809 
Barton. Walter W.. Rt. 2. Box 12. Corbin. 1432M. 9144 
Baskin. Sylvester, 214 West St., Box 1056, Lynch, Vi 8-5637 
Bartley, Robert E., Box 488, Hellier. SK 4-8376 
Baumeyer. William A.. 1304 E. Walnut. Evansville. Ind.. 

Ha 3-8110. Ha 2-9901 
Bell. Clarence T., 1228 So. 41st St., Louisville 11, Sp 8-7792, 

Ju 4-1361, Ext. 7122 
Bennett, Bert A., 14 Doris Dr., Covington, Ju 1-2121, Co 1-1114 
Bentley, James, Shelby Gap, 928, 648 

Berry, William, 1229 2nd, Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 36765 
Billings, B. E., Stanton, 2762, 2762 

Binder, Keith, Route 2, London, Uo 4-2481, Uo 4-2218 
Blackburn, Viley O., 114 Richardson Dr., Somerset, 1113, 162 or 

993 
Blankenship, Zeb, Route 6, Riihmond, 2229-M, 56 
Blanton, Homer, 716 Bellefonte-Priniess Rd.. Ashland. East 

4-1730. East 4-3730 
Boeh. Bill, 3804 MacNicholas, Deer Park 36, Ohio, Sy 1-8880, 

Po 1-1876 
Boeing, Charles F., 3969 Delmar Ave., Cincinnati 11, Ohio, 

Mo 1-7032. Mu 1-6300 
Bowlin. Don, Emlyn, 5058 

Bowling, Roy, Route 1, Box 6, London, Vo 4-4784, Vo 4-4784 
Bowman, Earl G., "Dick", 689 Mt. Vernon Dr., Lexington, 

6-0473, 2-3343 
Bradshaw, Bill, Burgin, 5265 
Braughler. David L.. Brooksville, Re 6-3311 
Brichler, Joe A., 5737 Kiefer Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, Ki 1-6049. 

Pa 1-1984 
Bridges, Bennie E., North Middletown, 4392 
Brizendine, Vic, 2711 Lakeside Dr., Louisville 6, Gl 4-6843, 

Ju 7-9111 
Brooks, Edwin C, R. R. 2, Smith Mills, Henderson Je 3-6245 
Brotzge, Maurice J., 3800 W. Broadway, Louisville, Sp 6-2506, 

Sp 6-2503 
Brown, E. C. Whipp Ave., Liberty, 4421, 4101 
Brown. J. Carlton, 411 O'Hara Dr., Danville, 1569J, 58 
Brown, John W., 525 E. N. Aspendale, Lexington, 5-0868, 2-3212 
Brown, Thomas, 3698 Kenoak Ln., Cincinnati 13, Ohio, El 

1-6532, Re 1-7360 
Brugh, Walter J., Paintsville, 1114, 97 

Bruner, Jack C, 133 Mahan Ave., London, Vo 4-4322. Vo 4-5189 
Bryan, William B., R. R. 4, Paris. 4801 NM, 4192 NM 
Bryant Jack E.. 135 Morris Rd., Lookout Heights. Covington, 

Ed 1-2819, Du 1-1400, Ext. 279 
Buis, N. A., Liberty, 3471, 2862 
Bunnell. Kenneth L.. Munfordville 
Burchett, Lanier. 1007 Appen Ave.. Columbia. Fu 4-2664. 

Fu 4-4111 
Burke. David L.. 10113 Donau Ln., Valley Station, We 7-3508 
Burkhart, Jimmy, Wallins, Mo 4-3597 
Butcher, Granville, Williamsport, 399 (Bus. No.) 
Buzzerio. Larry, 113 North 14th, Murray, 1764, 1764 
Buzzerio, Larry, 113 North 14th, Murray, 1754, 1764 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1958 



Byrd, Harry G.. 7331 North Timberlane Dr., Madeira, Cin- 
cinnati 43, Ohio, Locust 1-8745, Locust 1-9745 
Cain, Malcolm, Sr., 1509 Brigman Ave., Jeffersonville, Ind., 

Bu 2-9703, Bu 3-6611. Ext. 306, Bu 2-3815 
Cain, Paul D. "Chip", Jr., 1215 Corbett Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Ea 1-7246, Av 1-9740 
Campbell, French, Garrett, Wayland 5521 
Campbell, William C, 7602 Rosemary Ln., Louisville 14, 

Wa 1-9052, Em 6-9561, E.xt. 437 
Canady, Ray Blair, Court Square. Barbourville, 127 
Canter, John (NMNi, 1809 Shady Ln., Apt. 1, Louisville, 

Hi 7281-M, Ju 7-8862 
Carnes, Richard, 110 Plenty, New Richmond, Ohio, Ri 2-6642, 

Ri 2-6642 
Carson, Louis, 6301 Harding, Portsmouth, Ohio, Scioto 211-Y 

Elmvvood 34560 
Carter, Jack. Hazard, Oak 1177, 1088 
Caruso, Richard A., 1964 Compton Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Ja 1-3349, Ga 1-3300 
Cassady, Richard, 508 Nutwood, Bowling Green, Vi 3-3506, 

Vi 3-9078 
Casteel, Ralph M., East Bernstadt, VI 3-3730, VI 3-2730 
Castle, Lindle, Box 1571. Albany, 31 (Bus. No.) 
Cathey. Gene S., 1415 Vine St., Murray, 1986-R, 1408 
Center, Marion. P. O. Box 91, Campton 
Chafin, David Lee, Box 458. Wheelwright, 2741, 2261 
Chandler, James F., 131 Main, Paintsville, 374, 866 
Chattin, Charles, 2325 Harrod St., Ashland, Ea 4-5385, Ea 

4-6464 
Chumbler. W. W.. 1307 South 9th., Mayfield, 2821, 699 
Coffey, Kenneth B.. Jackson St., Berea, 154-J, 880 
Cole, Harold F.. Heidrick, 621-L. 341 

Coleman, Jim, P. O. Box 229, Bristol, Tenn., So 6903-RM 
Colgan, Donald L., Flemingsburg, 3671, 6511 
Collins Larry H., 604 E. 20th, Covington, Ax 1-8616, Me 1-0010 
Combs, James Glenn, 280 E. 3rd St., London, Vo 4-5284 
Combs, Ti-avis, 510 N. Main, Somerset, 1239, 143 
Combs, William E., Jr., 1300 McArthur Dr., Evansville, Ind., 

GR 7-4277, HA 3-4435 
Conley, George D., 2436 Roosevelt Ave., Ashland, EAst 4-6042 
Connor James R., 933 Saratoga St., Newport, Ju 16121, Hi 17102 
Cook, John Sam, College P. O. Box 255, Berea, 151-J 
Cooke, George W., Box 722, Morehead State College, Morehead, 

145, Ext. 36 
Coopei-, John, R. 2, Brooksville, PI 6-4608 
Cooper, John Wellington, Box 332, Danville, 2090 J, 9102 
Cooper, Warren H., 120 Barbour Ct., Morehead, 840J, 848 
Coppage, Donald L., R. R. 1, Walton, Fleetwood 7-5572, Fleet- 
wood 7-3071 
Coryell, Francis W., 162 Francis, Louisville, Em 3-5892 
Coudret, Raymond J., Jr., 2243 E. Iowa, Evansville, Ind., 

Gr 7-4259, Ha 5-3339 
Coyle, Ernest T.. 6 So. Burns Ave., Winchester 
Grace, James. Rt. 2, Box 373, St. Albins, W. Va., Pa 74779, 

Po 83911 
Craft, Bill, 638 Longview Dr., Lexington, 74843, 60160 
Crawford. Fred T.. 1711 Blake, Bowling Green, Vi 3-6441, Vi 

3-9051 
Cropper, William C, R. R. 2, Mays Lick, c/o Clyde Cropper, 

503, 2602 
Crosthwaite, John S., Jr., Box 236, Big Stone Gap, Va., 104 

(Bus. No.) 
Crutcher, James W., 3210 Cawein Way, Louisville, Gl 8-6830, 

Em 6-56S8 
Crutcher, Joseph Lamar, 115 Edelen, Box 346, Vine Grove, 

Tr 7-2448 
Cullivan. Jim, College Station, Murray, 2060, 740 
Gulp, Cant. V/illard E.. Hats. 326 Eng. Bn., Abw Div., Ft. 

Campbell, 4048, 4494 
Cummings, Dale A., 303 Forrestdale, Fulton, 908, 9142 
Cummins. Albert B.. 3974 Mantell Ave., Cincinnati 36, Ohio, 

Sy 1-1536, Po 1-4100, Ext. 2156 
Cummings, Josh. 2139 Memorial Pky., Ft. Thomas. Hi 1-1679, 

Po 1-4100, Ext. 1771 
Curtis, Robert Lee, 700 Main, Manchester, Ohio, 73Y, 38 High 

School 
Damico, Ernie, 1758 E. McMillan St., Cincinnati, Ohio, Wo 

1-8058, Du 1-2200, Ext. 370 
Daum, Charles A., 620W. N. 4th Ave., Evansville, Ind., Ha 

44933, Ha 28805 
Davenport, William T., 315 Village Dr., Elizabethtown, 6-5451 
Davis, Dwight R., Jr., 3516 Hycliffe Ave., Louisville 7, 

Tw 5-7302, Ju 4-1361, Ext. 7179 
Davis, Harold T.. Route 3. Beaver Dam. Br 4-4665 
Davis, Ralph E., Main St., Vanceburg, Swift 6-4501, Swift 

6-2521 
Davis, William P.. 1003 8th St., Huntington, W. Va. 
Davison. Donald E.. 2620 Wendell, Louisville 5, Gl 46079, 

Gl 47511, Ext. 705 
DeMoisey, Truett R., P. O. Box 7, Walton, 1423, 1423 
Denton, Charles M., 1427 Clay, Henderson, Va 6-4020, Va 

6-3195 
Deskins, Tilden, Elkhorn City, Sk 4-4031, Sk 4-6981 
DiMuzio. Robert M.. 6422 Golfway Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Ki 1-2220, Wa 1-1180 
Dixon, Charles T., W, Main, Carlisle, 247, Richmond - Keith 

Hall 
Dorsey, James A., 1110 Gilsey Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, GR 18050 
Downing, Thomas E., Gamaliel, 7-2341 (Bus. No.) 



Doyle, Donald, 229 Risen Ave., Campbellsville, 211M, 321 

Dr.rke, Richard Ray, 61 Edwards Ct., Ft. Thomas, Hi 1-4235 

Durham, Montie, S. 2nd St., Richmond, 899 

Durkin, J^ck H., 240 Hillsboro, Lexington, 44396, 41717 

Earle, Herschel G., Berry 

Eaton, James Marvin, 214 Carolyn, Greenville, 624J 

Edelen, Ben R., 3309 Wellingmoor, Louisville, Gl 4-3518, 

Gl 2-2611 
Edwards, Donald A., 119 E. Main, Sebree, Te 5-7537 
Edwards, "iubert, 600 Tutt St., Columbia, Fu 4-5332, Fu 4-4531 
Elliott, Humphrey T., Liberty, 4291 
Ellis, Walter H., R. R. 1, Box 188, West Paducah, 3-1439, 

3-1439 
Elrod, Wm. Turner, 332 Sumpter, Bowling Green, 2-5110, 

3-4334 
Engle, Orville, 128 Oak St., Pineville, 7-2916 
Ensslin, Charles W., 716 N. Main St., Barbourville, 185, 145 
Feix, Jimmie, Western Ky. State College, Bowling Green, Victor 

39635, Victor 34334, Ext. 21 
Ferrell, Doc, 541 Hill-n-Dale. Lexington, 74273, 40301 
Fields, Joe D., Route 1, Gilbertsville, Forest 2-4362 
Fitchko, Bill. Norton, Va., 466-W, 602 or 554 
Flood. Earl S., Route 2, Farmington, FI 5-2143 
Fortney, Robert Lee, 2817 Breckinridge Ln., Louisville, 

Gl 8-1079, Ju 2-3511, Ext. 474 
Foster. Berryman E., 927 Waverly Dr., Lexington, 31827, 20515 
Fraley, Bill, 1604 Lee Dr., Henderson, 7-9410 
Francis, Wendell, 809 N. Race, Glasgow, 01 1-5687, 01 1-2136 
Frazer, Tom Roe, 311 Willow Hts., Clarksville, Tenn., 73287, 

72372 Midway Exch. 
Freeman, Thomas E., F-130 Cooperstown, Lexington, 2-2200, 

Ext. 2324 (Bus. No.) 
Freese, Oliver T., 6965 Euclid Rd., Cincinnati 43, Ohio, Tw 

14041, Me 12295 
Fugate. E. Hugh, Price, McDowell 2911, Prestonsburg 6261 
Fuson, Shelvie, 312 Englewood Rd.. Middlesboro, 1541, 263 
Gardner, Daniel H., 104 So. Adams, Henderson, Ha 71297, 

Chrysler Corp. 
Gettler, John F., 705 Providence Rd., Lexington, 28845, 25494 
Gilbert, Gerald LeRoy, High St., Vine Grove, Tr 7-5254, 4950 

or 6914 Ft. Knox 
Gilbert, Lawrence "Butch", 208 Southern Dr., Campbellsville, 

737-R, 3S6 
Giordano, Al, c/o Caldwell Co. H. S., Princeton 
Glaysbrook, James Edward, 66 S. Daves St., Madisonville 
Golden, Billy Joe, 568 E. Main, Box 451, Lynch, Vi 8-2512 
Goley, James E., 31 Wallace, Florence, At 3-2812, Ax 1-5447 
Grace, Charles K., Cypress Street, Pineville, Edgewood 7-3331, 

Edgewood, 7-2392 
Greene, Omar Paul, 3903 Glenn Ave., Covington, Ju 1-1706, 

Dunbar 1-3300, Ext. 330 
Griese, Warren J., Route 1, Box 226-5, Evansville, Ind., Yu 

52880, Ha 34281 
Griffith, Daryel, Mouth Card 

Grigsby. Pete, Jr., P. O. Box 692, Hazard, Grand 1162 
Grimes, James W., Lewisburg, Skyline 5-8061 
Grtiton, Robert A., 443 W. Office, Harrodsburg. 963, 660 
Gustafson, Al, Jr., 240 Francis Bldg., Louisville, Gl 4-6151, 

Ju 4-2058, Ju 4-7655 
Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 942 Wolf Run Rd., Lexington, 5-5332, 

2-7860 
Hagan, Joseph (Red). 3000 Sherbrooke Rd., Louisville, Gl 8-1325, 

Hall, Bob, Box 444, Cumberland, 43W, 52J 

Hall, Monroe, Jr., Belfry, Stone 3485, 790 

Hammons, Norman. Route 4, Hopkinsville, Tu 5-6914, Tu 5-6914 

Hancock, Morris W., Route 1, Fulton, 1222-R-2, 1399 

Hardin, Ben W., Marrowbone, 6830 (Bus. No.) 

Harmon, Charles W.. 435 North 3rd, Williamsburg, 6709 

Harris. Jerrv Lee, Route 1, Rockhold, 1064-J-l 

Harris, Joe D., Gen. Del., Nebo, CI 9-3561 

Harris. Thomas P., Jr., R. 1, Allensville, Co 5-2791 

Harrod, Tedford E., 4740 C. Prichard PI., Ft. Knox, 6757, 

Wi 22568 
Hartig, Malcolm W., 2329 E. 111., Evansville. Ind., Gr 6-7242, 

Ha 3-1051 
Hartley, William E., 1121 Marshall, Evansville, Ind., Gr 7-0631, 

Gr 7-0631 
Hatfield, Cecil, Box 844, Berea College, Berea, 846-R 
Hatter, Jack, 1654 Amsterdam Rd., Covington, Ed 1-2444, 

Mo 1-9962 
Hawkins, Ralph B., 661 E. Broadway, Madisonville, Ta 1-7788, 

Ta 1-7603 
Hawkins, Robert W., Echo Ln., Madisonville, Ta 1-6188, 

Ta 1-2990 
Hayden, Jack, 1624 Stafford Ave., Louisville, Em 7-8662, 

Gl 4-0411 
Hayden, Samuel J.. Fancy Farm, Ma 33641, Ma 33181 
Hellmann, Ronald F., 314 East 17th, Covington, AX 1-2216 
Henson, Tony C, Pryorsburg 
Hcwling, Franklin C, 1125 Orchard, Newport, CO 1-7380, 

GA 1-3700 
Hewling, Richard, 211 Linden Ave., Newport, Ax 1-2299. 

Me 1-0010 
Hibbs. Eugene M., 109 East Arch St.. Madisonville, Ta 1-6811 
Highbaugh, Ottis, Bonnieville, Ja 4-4047 (Bus. No.) 
Higgins. Bobby D., Slaughters 

Hils, M. David, 139 Wildwood, Cincinnati 16, Ohio, Po 1-0443, 
Pa 1-4040 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1958 



Page Nine 



Hitt, Billy D., 127 Forest Ave., Maysville, So 3-2661 

Hodge, Don Robert, 1012 S. E. 2nd St., Evansville, Ind., 

Ha 3-2436 
Hodge, Fred, Oil Joyce Ave., Evansville, Ind., Gr 7-2993, 

Ha 4-6411 
Hodges, Holbert. 516 N. Hill, London, Vo 4-5673 
Hoferer, Louis R., 420 McClelland, Cincinnati, Ca 1-3022, 

Wa 1-9841 
Holbrook, Arthur, P. O. Box 103, Leatherwood 
Holmes, Mike, E. 1, Hopkinsville, Tu 55463 
Holeman, Bill, Box 433, Manchester, Ly 8-2289 
Hooks, Robert H., Main, Wheelwright, Night 2122, Day 2121 
Hornsby. John W., 826 N. 25th, Paducah, 2-1753, 56311, Ext. 657 

Union Carbide 
Howard, Oscar D., 256 Vets Village, Richmond 
Hubbard. Ronald E., 635 Moulton PI., Portsmouth, Ohio, EI 

34993 
Hubbs, Cletus L., Jr., Box 64. Sedalia, Fa 8-3453, Fa 8-3241 
Hudson, Oscar, 708 Highland Ave., Hazard, Grand 698 
Huff, Carl R., Jr., 4207 Longfield Dr., Evansville, Ind., Ha 

27234, Ha 51011, Ext. 246 
Huiet, Fred "Whitey", 7327 Osceola Dr., Madeira, Ohio, Locust 

1-9239, Ch 1-4768 
Hummer, Irby, 206 College, Hodgenville, EL 8-3009, EL 8-3000 
Hunley, Neil P., West Liberty, Sh 33131 
Hunt, Leonard D.. 360 N. Upper, Lexington. 46125 
Hurst, David E., Box 453, Middlesboro, 707, 263 
Hurst, Harold M., Stanton, 4423, 4423 
Hutchinson, Jack T., Martin 7, S427, 7051 Prestonsburg 
Hutt, Joseph D.. Jr., 608 Wallace, Louisville 7, Tw 3-5060, 

Ju 4-3545 
Hyland, Frank "Dick", P. O. Box 465, So. Webster, Ohio, 

Scioto 7230, Waverly 5-100 
Inman, Briscoe, Centre College, Danville, 3075, 1900, Ext. 26 
Irwin, Charlie, Route 4, Hopkinsville, Tu 6-4820. Tu 6-4820 
Jarvis, Lindle F., 164 Glenwood Ave., Winnetka, III., Al 1-0631 
Jenkins, James D., Route 1. Bowling Green, 2-6954, 2-6964 
Jenkins, Kean, 210 Morningside, Elizabethtown, Ro 6-4087, 

Ro 5-4606 
Johnson, Walter, Box 397, Grayson, Gr 4-4689, Gr 4-5581 
Johnson, William Bernard, Route 7. Hopkinsville, Am 9-2208, 

Tu 6-5366 
Jones, Boyer, 437 Jackson St., Campbellsville, 507M, 184 
Jones, Carson G., 713 N. Main, Evansville, Ind., Ha 23069, 

HA 47741, Ext. 260 
Jones, Charles Junior, 2834 Yorkshire Blvd.. Louisville, Gl 8-1293 
Jones, Edward B., IIL USATCA Special Services, Ft. Knox, 

6433, 2955 
Jones, George W., Jr., 216 Christ Rd., Evansville, Ind., 

Ha 23348, Ha 61011 
Jones, Joseph Q., Route 3, Box 167, Louisville 19, WO 9-5898, 

ME 4-8311 
Jones, Robert E., 220 W. 6th, Winona, Minn., 2291, 3059 
Jordan, Ken, 104 W. Orchard Rd., Ft. Mitchell, Ed 1-2747, 

Ga 1-3100 
Judy, Russell Max, 1639 Cypress. Paris, 867 
Justice, Morris W., Route 1, Pikeville, GE 7-7927 
Kaler, William R., 1602 Main St., Murray, 891-W 
Kastner, Alfred J., 5797 Kennedy Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

EL 1-2426, KI 1-1800-778 
Keene, Marcum, Biggs 

Key, Calvin, Hazel, HY 2-3431, HY 2-2341 

King, James A., 720 So. 43rd, Louisville, SP 8-3690, SP 6-2466 
King, John J., Jr., 1758 Dixdale, Louisville 10, ME 4-8316 

(Bus. No.) 
King, P. J., 307 Coast Guard Lane, Owensboro, MU 3-2401 

(Bus. No.) 
Kinman, Joe T., Roselawn Dr.. Williamstown, TA 48631 
Krahwinkel, Hugh G., Jr., 324 Lucas, Owensboro, MU 3-0810, 

MU 3-5965 
Kremer, Joseph, 3727 Glenmeade Rd., Louisville, GL 4-3991, 

JU 7-7747 
Lance, Walter N., 2319 Maple St., Owensboro, MU 3-3974, 

MU 3-1691 
Lashbrook, Harry E., Jr., 607 Warwick Dr., Owensboro, 

MU 3-0831, MU 3-2431 
Lay, William B., 309 Rice St., Irvine, 22260, Ext. 2667 (Bus. 

No.) 
Lazarus, Rhea Price, 1609 Nutwood, Bowling Green, VI S-8398 
Lee, Robert L., 217 Ridgeway Ave., Louisville 7, TW 5-6497, 

TW 6-2431 
Levan, T. F., P. O. Box 31, Benton, LA 7-3221, LA 7-4521 
Lewis, Howard, 939 Florence Ave., Louisville, Emerson, 66911, 

Eastern High School 
Lewis, Milus G., Bailey St., Loyall, 1119 W, 2 
Little. James Glenn. Hellier, SK 4-8377 
Logsdon, David L., 1160 Lincoln Ave., Louisville, ME 7-3192, 

SP 6-3921 
Long, Wm. G., Jr., 209 Idlewylde, Louisville 6, TW 5-8731, 

ME 5-5211 
Longenecker, David M., 3910 Olympic, Louisville, TW 6-9071, 

TW 6-3401, E.xt. 301-2 
Looney. Dick, Pikeville. GE 7-6410 

Lowe, Eugene T., 107 Ford, London, RO 4-5724, RO 4-2207 
Lucas, Gene T., 412 Clayton Ave., Geoergetown, 1371, 19 
Lyons, Charles S., Sharpsburg, 2457 
Lytle, William Price, 98 Colonial Ct., Owensboro, MU 3-7723, 

MU 4-3232 



McAnelly, David F., 324 E. Maxwell, Lexington, 5-2241 
McCargo, Frank, Route 2, Hopkinsville, TU 6-4532, TU 5-9400 
McClellan. L. B., 2512 Goldsmith Lane, Louisville, GI 8-2598, 

JU 7-911 
McCowen, Connell, R. 1, Box 261, Corbin, 2361 
McFall, Gene G., Nancy, 8112 Y 
McGIasson, Galen, 212 North Bend Rd., Hebron, MU 9-7330, 

MU 9-7330 
McGuffey, Harold B., Smiths Grove, LO 3-2022, LO 3-3031 
McGuire. Claude L., P. O. Box 537, Morehead 
McHenry. Louis P., 408V., S. Main St., Hopkinsville, TU 6-2601, 

TU 6-2813 
McLeod, Robert, Wahle Apts., Somerset, 571, 646 
McPike, Ray S., 309 Theatre Bldg., 629 So. 4th Street, Louis- 
ville 2, Hi 6398W, JU 5-2832 
Macon, Alan Leon, 1769 Wilart Dr., Louisville 10, Sp 6-7906, 

Ju 4-1361, Line 473 
Mahurin, Larry R., Route 3, Sebree, Tu 4-4675 
Marble, Luke, 3664 Manslick Rd., Louisville 15, Em 6-0154, 

Ju 4-3184 
Martin, Charlie, Box 63, Sharpsburg 
Martin, William Jennings, Mousie 

Massey, Douglas L., 39 Center Street, Berea, 301 (Bus. No.) 
Matarazzo, Sal, 320 N. Mulberry, Elizabethtown, RO 5-5689, 

6255 
May, E. B., Jr., Box 185, Prestonsburg, 2314, 7661 
Mayo, Henry L., Paintsville, 856, 29 or 30 
Mazza, AI. "Babe", Glenroy Dr., North Kenova, Ohio, 4-4625 

(Ches.), 8-4343 South Point, Ohio 
Meade, Foster "Sid", South Portsmouth, Fl 2-1391, Fl 2-1311 
Meeks, Jack, 407 5th Street, Corbin. 415, 561 
Melton, Curtis Ray, Nebo, Ci 9-3802, Ta 1-3870 
Menshouse, Glen, 2017 Main, Ashland, East 4-6397 
Metcalf, Earl, 3441 Lovelaceville Road, Paducah, 2-1359 
Meyer, Bud, 6319 Lilibet Ct., Cincinnati 38, Ohio, Bl 1-3459, 

Pa 1-4334 
Miles, Joseph D., 124 Harrison Ave., Jeffersonville, Ind., 

Bu 2-4794, Sp 6-4653 
Miller, Bob. 197 Holiday Lane, Ft. Thomas, Hi 1-5886, Co 1-2980 
Miller, Claude 0., 704V. 10th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Miller, Ferrel, Cadiz, 8494, Trigg County High School 
Miller, Rex J., 2711 Greenway Rd., Ashland, EA 45023, EA 46641 
Miller, Roy J., 644 Whitcomb, Clarksville, Ind., Bn 3-6336, 

Em 6-6286 
Miller, William A., 1601 Shelby Ave., Evansville 14, Ind., 

Gr 6-9542, Ha 6-7276 
Mills, Claude. 861 S. Brinker, Columbus, Ohio, By 9-3397, 

By 9-0646 
Mitchell, Emmett, 284 Taylor Dr., Lexington, 5-2480, 4-4254 
Mobley, Tony, Kappa Alpha House, Georgetown. 735 
Moll, Charles J., Jr., 231 Norbourne Blvd., Louisville, Tw 7-2712, 

Sp 8-2731, Ext. 270 
Moll, Francis B., 820 Mulberry St., Mt. Vernon, Ind., Po 3-2870, 

Po 3-4489 
Monahan, Ed, 6821 Tarawa Dr.. Cincinnati, Ohio, Jackson 

1-6582, Mulberry 1-8300 
Moore, James E., Route 5, Box 91A, London, Vo 4-2064, 1915 

Corbin 
Moore, Robert, Jr. 217 Center, Florence, At 3-5578, He 1-4040 
Moore, Roy, Jr., South Main St., London, Vo 4-5023, Vo 4-5023 
Moser, Emerson, Sebree, Slaughters Tu 4-4704 
Moser, Rudy Clay, Route 2, Sebree 

Mouser, H. D., Princeton Rd., Madisonville, Ta 1-4864, Ta 1-6333 
Mullins, B. E., Paintsville, 432, 545 

Mussman, Ralph, Jr., 502 Monroe, Newport, Ju 1-4662, Co 1-3120 
Myers, Edward B.. 312 Seay St., P. O. Box 696, Glasgow, Olive 

1-2445, Olive 1-2445 
Nau, Bill, Barbourville, 203 317 
Neal, Gene, 549 Washington, New Richmond, Ohio, Ri 2-5751, 

Av 1-4630 
Neal, Marion, 2215 8th Street, Portsmouth, Ohio, El 3-3948, 

El 3-4401 
Newman, E. B., 602 6th. Paintsville, 1287 
Newsom, Marley, 109 Davision St., Pikeville 
Newsome, Forest, Box 185, Wheelwright, 2784, 2142 
Newton, C. M., 2041 Dellwood Dr., Lexington, 7-2865, 4-2431 
Nixon, James W., Route 7, Hopkinsville, Tu 6-2641 
Noble, Charles B., Main St., Box 471, Jackson, No 6-2728, 

No 6-9224 
Noel, Robert A., Route 3. Winchester, 766 M-2 
O'Daniel. Jeff, Route 1, Lebanon, 7112 

Oldham, John, Route 1, Box 79A, Prospect, Ca 8-1698, Tw 3-3636 
Omer, Billy W., Route 5, Madisonville, Ta 1-2833 
Overly, William H., 210 N. Maple, Somerset, 1294, 1294 
Owen, Arthur P., 2627 Meadowlark Lane, Evansville, Ind., 

Ha 3-7883. (Bus No.) 
Padgett, R. K., 123 N. Central Ave.. Somerset, 961W, 12 
Page, Forrest C, 3007 Taylor, Evansville, Ind., Gr 7-0088, 

Gr 6-7211 
Palmer. Carl A., 2606 So. 7th Street, Ironton, Ohio. 4171 
Park, J. M., 924 Yarbo Lane. Paducah. 5-6567, 5-52.t|2 
Parker, Billie E., P. O. Box 731. Pineville, Edgewood 7-3293 
Patrick, Charles C. Route 2, Lexington. 4-4616. 4-4516 
Patrick, Ralph, 1700 Edward, Ashland, Ea 4-7535, Ashland Oil 

Ext. 689 
Patterson. C. Clement, Jr., 272 Ingram Ave., Flemingsburg, 3711 
Paulin, Al, Franklin, Tell City, Ind., 1233J, 1233J 
Payne, Gayle H., Pleasureville, 4200 
Peeno, Harry R., 422 Oak St., Ludlow, Ju 1-7335 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1958 



Pergrem, Nard, 2616 Country Club Ct., Ashland, Ea 4-7664, 

1-1155, Ext. 390 
Perry, James £., Koute 6, Paducah, 3-6740, 5-7251 
Phelps, Jonn B., 302 Johnson Eoad, London, Vo 4-6656, Vo 

4-4151 
Phelps, Ralph "Rudy", Box 533, Russell, G 172. 253 
Philpot, Kelse^f Edward, P. O. Box 181, Williamsburg, 6686 
Pittard, Pred W., 12a iVlimosa Lane, Paducah, 3-6680, Ex 5-4121, 

Ext. 64, Calvert City 
Poe, Thomas E., Route 6, Benton, La 7-7663 
Polston, Billy D., Burkesville, 63, 146 
Poppas. Nicholas, 1705 Rivieia Court, Dayton, Ohio 
Porter, David D., Box 405, Hazard, Park 1125 
Powell, Pat E., 7412 Dunkirk Lane, Valley Station, West 7-5457, 

6630 Ft. Knox 
Presson. Joe, 307 S. 16th, Murray, 2695W 

Preston, James Woodrow, Route 2. Box 37, Pikeville, Ge 7-4644 
Prior, Lowell F., 1722 Highland Ave., Portsmouth, Ohio, 

El 3-0700 
Powell, Logan, 416 Woodland, Le.xington, 6-1663 
Purdy, George D., Bradsfordsville, 9004 
CJualey, Lawrence V., hJAVY No. 824. Box 26 c/o Fleet Post 

Otfice, Srn t rancisco, Calif. 
Quigg, Ben F., IV, Third Street, Livermore, Br 8-2620, Mu 

3-2401 
Rains. Darrel. Emlyn 

Randall, H. C, 106 Church, Columbia, FU 4-4661, FU 4-4711 
Kandoiph, Don M., 6310 Shelia Kd., Louisville 19, Wo 9-6359, 

Wo 9-5145 
Randolph, John W., Route 5, Cadiz 
Ray, Jbi-ankie. 316 Vets Village, Richmond, 244 
Redman, Malvern G., Box 55, Mt. Vernon, Ind., PC 3-3328, 

PC 3-2637 
Reed, Goidon "iVioe", 22 Riverside ParKway, Ft. Thomas, Hi 

1-4946, Du 1-4607 
Reynolds, Howard M., 407 Holt Ave., Mt. Sterling, 1068 
Kice, Fred, Tyner, 4-2172 

Rice. James F., 506 Morehead, Central City, 205, 674 
Richards, James S., Box 94, Columbia, FU 4-3635, Vi 3-9186 

Bowling Green 
Richardson, Charles E., Waco, 2401, 4021 
Richardson. Joe M., 210 York St., Greenville, 1077-W, 48 
Rickard, Bob, 805 Clay St., Owensboro, MU 4-4411 
Rlggs, William T., 2S Congress Dr., Morganfield, 590, 9168 or 

Roller, Otis, 3712 Nanz, Louisville 7, TW 5-6356, JU 7-1121, 

Ext. 302 
Rolph, Harold J., 915 S. 7th St., Ironton, Ohio, 2069 R, 1390 
Rosenbaum, Robert, 117 Fairlawn Rd., Louisville TW 7-2833, 

JU 4-8191 
Rouse, Clyde L., 630 Erlanger Rd., Erlanger, Di 1-6943, He 

1-3604 
Rubarts, Leiand G., Dunnville, Liberty 2784 (Bus. No.) 
Russell, Eugene •'Eudy", 1106 Gallia. Portsmouth, Ohio, EI 

3-7653, EI 3-4670 
Russell, Joe, Orchard Dr., Russellville, Pa 6-6983, Pa 6-6983 
Salcnii, Stanley W., 105 Aspen Ave.. Frankfort. Ca 3-8420, 

Ca 3-3350 
Sallee, Charles, P. O. Box 67, Evansville, Ind., Ha 2-8626, 

Ha 3-117'J 
Samples, Bernard M., Hillcrest Add., Box 263, Corbin, 144-J, 

144-J 
Samples, Gilbert, 502 Johnson, London, Vo 4-5825 
Sayior, Deward, Box 407, Wallins Creek, Mo 4-3594 
Scheben, William J., 14 Dixie Highway, Erlanger, Di 1-6054, 

Di 1-6832 
Schnebelt Carl, Hanover, Ind., Un 6-3943, Un 6-4661 
Schultz, Paul, 2212 Mabert Kd., Portsmouth, Ohio, El 4-2082 
Scott, W. L., 1816 McDonald Rd., Lexington, 2-3316, 4-3663 
Seelye, Arthur L., 2309 Jones, Paducah, 5-7776 
Settle, Evan, 102 Alton Rd., Shelbyville, 661 W, 142 
Settle, Roy, 1413 St. Mary's Ave., Owensboro, MU 3-2136, 

MU 3-3574 
Sexton, William, 324 4th, Dayton, He 1-5941, Ma 1-4321, Line 40 
Shaw, Don, College St., Baibourville, 75, Union College 
Shaw, Stanley E., 4460 W. 8th St., Cincinnati 38, Ohio, GR 

1-1100, MU 1-3510 
Shirley. Henry R.. Route 2. Box 485, Fairdale, Em 8-3260, 

Sp 8-2731, Ext. 353 
Shope, Lowell M., 30 Webb St., South Webster, Ohio, Scioto 

2131. Waverly 5100. Ext. 2665 
Showalter. John W.. Georgetown 
Simms, Wavelan J.. Jr.. Co. B Spec. Tng. Regt. USATCA, 

Ft. Knox, 6033, 6033 
Sloan, Wallace, 419 Oread Rd., Louisville, TW 6-1126, TW 7-2554 
Small, Rex, 300 E. 27th, Owensboro, 42846, 3-2431 
Smith, Edgar J., 3904 Farmview, Louisville 18, Gl 8-1286 
Smith, E. H., III. 3730 Taylorsville Rd., Louisville 5, Gl 4-0374, 

Gl 4-0374 
Smith, Eurie H., Jr., 3730 Taylorsville Rd., Louisville, Gl 

4-0374. TW 5-3452 
Smith, David W., 8107 Rory Way, Louisville 19, WO 9-0060, SP 

2-0968, WH 4-3224 
Smithson. Richard, 821 Palatka Rd., Louisville, Em 8-2853 
Sosh, LaRue, Uniontown, 1, 200 
Sosh. Nelson, Uninotown, 123, 200 
Stacy, Richie M., West Liberty, Sh 3-4742 
Stanfill, Robert S.. Route 1, Louisa, Me 8-4014, Ashland Oil 

& Ref., E.xt. 567 



Starns, Harry T., 170 Forest Ave., Lexington, 2-4326 
Steenken, William R., 1636 Highland, Covington, Ed 1-3789, 

He 1-3108 
Stephenson, Tnomas H., 1234 Jefferson St., Paducah, 5-7765, 

2-4634 Reidland 
Stewart, Herbert T., 34 Locust, Lothair, High 89 
Stinson, Charles L., Maple St., Horse Cave, St 6-7071, St 1-7131 
Strong, Arnett, 425 Cedar, Hazard, No. 389, Main 3-3000 
Sturg.ll, Barkley J., Prestonsburg, 6781, 2391 
Stutler, John P., 1621 Cumberland Ave., South Hills, Covington, 

Ed 1-2631 
Sullivan, Don C, Mayo Addn., Prestonsburg. 2197 2371 
Sullivan, Wallace Bryan, Box 157, Stearns 
Sumner, Harold Carl. 1856 Heaton Rd., Louisville, Em 8-3647, 

Wh 4-8585 
Surface, William E., Courier Journal Sports Dept., Louisville, 

Sp 4-5593, Ju 5-2211, Ext. 488 
Swope, William, 406 Breckinridge, Lexington, 5-2548 
Sykes, Harry N., 439 Bamberger Rd., Lexington, 6-2252, 2-0640 
Tackitt, Paris, Dorton 
Taylor, Bob, 2231 Hawthorne, Louisville, Gl 4-3423, Me 4-1681, 

Ext. 281 
Taylor, Carl R., Route 3. Box 250, Corbin, 1718, 1938 
Taylor, Hal, 9802 Driandi Ct., Jeffersontown, An 7-6764, 

Gl 8-5142 
Taylor, James R., 425 Robertson, Lexington, 2-8662 
Teague, Amos, Homewood Dr., Madlsonville, Ta 1-4639, Ta 

1-6333 
Thompson, Jack, 2347 Saratoga Dr., Louisville, Gl 2-9256 
Tnompson, Ralph, 649 Ivy Hill Dr., Cincinnati 38, Ohio, 

BI 1-5394, Wa 1-0047 
Tindall, Gene D., Route 3, Shelbyville, 926-M2, 148 
Todd, Lonnie H., 644 S. Scott Street, Madlsonville, Ta 1-7438, 

Ta 1-2986 
Trimer, Norman E., 2010 Patrica Dr., Valley Station, 

WE 7-2729, Ft. Knox 2334 
Troutman, Doyle, Harlan, 1937, 522 
Tuck, Ochell, 124 Lexington Dr., Glasgow, 3331, 3811 
Turner, Thomas, 9836 Douglas, Cincinnati 15, Ohio, Pr 1-5065, 

Po 1-4100, Ext. 1329 
Vanhoose, Edgar N., Nippa, 766 M, 296 

Vanhoose. Jimmy L., Stafford Dr., Paintsville, 9105 (Bus. No.) 
Varble, William E., 1705 Cypress, Louisville, Sp 5-6712, 

Sp 2-3621, Demurrage Dept. 
Varner, Kay G., 1002 Birch Dr., Lexington. 2-5434, 5-4224, 

Sta. 210 
Vettiner, Charles J., Armory BIdg., Louisville 
Vice, Cliff, Jr., Route 1, Myers, 538 J-3 Carlisle, 87 
Vineyard, Chalmer E., 401 South Main St., Somerset, 1424, 224 
Vinson, Ray T., McRoberts, 7726 Fleming 
Waddell, William R., 4719 Granada Dr., Valley Station. 

We 7-1289 
Waide. Harry. 610 Church St., Providence, Mohawk 7-2421, 

Mohawk 7-2065 
Waldrop, Douglas Samuel, Park City, Sh 9-2196 
Waike, Glenn H.. 902 1st Street, Paintsville, 91, 221 
Walker, Edward Earl, Kevil 
Waiker, Paul R., 626 Meadowlawn, Bowling Green, Victor 

3-8893, Victor 3-8326 
Wallen, Howard W., Williamsport, 662 R-3 

Wanchic, Nicholas. USPH Hospital. Lexington. 2-1760. 2-8328 
Warner. Marvin A.. Nancy 
Waters. Allen D.. Springfield, 4282, 3911 
Weaver, Ray, 318i/i E. 10th Street, Bowling Green, Vi 3-9779 

(Bus No.) 
Weber, John, 4829 Kollman Dr., Covington, Ax 1-6199 
Weber, Walter W., 338 Anderson Ferry Road, Delhi Hill 38, 

Ohio, Bl 1-0161 
Welch. Frank T., Sidney 
Welch. John H., Neon, 7746 

Welch. Ralph W., 3011 Wedgewood Way, Louisville 5, Gl 8-1746 
Welch, Thomas P., 3932 Vine Vista PI., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Av 1-8094, Ga 1-5700, Ext. 371 
Wells. Milford. 344 Bays Ave., Morehead. 1064, 455 R 
Wesche, James Allen, 427 Queensway, Lexington, 4-4413 
Westerfield, Glenn. 536 Stanley, Evansville, Indiana, Ha 3-9670 
Westhotf, Robert A., 26 St. Jude's Ct., Florence, Di 1-5065 

(Bus. No. I 
Whalen, William C, Route 1, Maysville, Lp 4-3942, Lo 4-3461 
Whedbee, Melville, 1301 So. 32nd, Louisville, Sp 8-0465 
White, James "Pete", Lynch, Vi 8-6608 
White. William Jason, Eddyville, 3052, 3391 
Wigginton, Al, Sr., 1037 Cecil Ave., Louisville, Sp 6-7881. 

Sp 6-7881 
Wilcox, Edgel M., Oil Springs 
Wilson, Raymond B.. 21 Burnham, Green Hills, Cincinnati 18, 

Ohio, Ja 1-4277, Ja 1-3286 
Williams. Bob. 144 Aspen Ave., Richmond, 2671 
Williams, Reid V., Mt. Hermon 

Williams, Roger, Cornelison Drive, Richmond, 2407 
Willis, Robert A.. 2916 W. Walnut, Louisville, SP 8-1391, JU 

5-2251, Ext. 282-283 
Winfrey, Shelby, 8 Holly St., Berea, 805, 850 
Wingficld, Felix G., 1134 Eastern Pkwy., Louisville, Me 6-2751, 

Sp 6-4633 
Womack, Wm. H., 1131 Burris. Henderson, Va 6-9780 
Wood, H. Phillip, Route 6. Bowling Green. 2-2760, 2-6705 
Wood, Kenneth C, 118 Maryland Ave., Frankfort, Ca 3-0244 
Woten, Lawrence, 116 Offnere St., Portsmouth, Ohio, El 3-2376 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1958 



Page Eleven 



Wray, Barrel, P. O. Box 545, Water Valley 

Wright, H. W., Jr., 714 Cedar Grove Ct., Louisville, SP 4-5173, 

JU 7-1161 
Wurtz, Emil, 18 E. 4th Street, Cincinnati, Ohio, Gr 1-0526, 

Du 1-1232 
Yates, Bertheal, Route 3, Fulton, Dukedom, Tenn. Exchange 
Yates, William D., Route 2, Fulton, 1580-R, 9176 
Yates, Virgil, Wingo, Fr 63587, Fr 63271 
Yeary, William H., Jr., 156 Lowry Lane, Lexington 7-1578, 

2-6603 
Zalla, John Walter. 1622 Woodburn Ave., Covington, He 1-5897 



FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 

which: (a) R2 or (b) Kl fouls and kick then goes 
out-of-bounds. 

Ruling: In both (a) and (b) next down will be 
1st. In (a), if K declines penalty, ball will be award- 
ed to R at inbounds spot. If K accepts penalty, it 
will be measured from the previous spot and the 
ball will belong to K on his 40 yardline, 1st Down- 
10. In (b), R may decline penalty which will give 
ball to R at the inbounds spot or R may accept pen- 
alty which will be measured from previous spot. 
After enforcement, it will be 1st Down-10 for K 
on K's 10. 

12. Play: Runner Al advances to B's 1 yardline 
near sideline. He runs into opposition and dives over 
sideline to carry ball across goal line extended be- 
fore runner or ball touches ground to become out- 
of-bounds. Is it the intent of Rule 2-9 and Rule 
4-3-2 that this be a touchdown ? 

Ruling: If these two sections of the rule were 
taken literally, there would be grounds for award- 
ing touchdown. However, it is not intended the run- 
ner be allowed to score in this manner. Officials 
are instructed to consider his inbounds forward 
progress as having stopped when he crossed plane 
of the sideline. 

Comment: The revised rule is designed to cover 
situations in which runner might be advancing into 
end zone while avoiding the touching- of sideline 
and with ball being carried over out-of-bounds 
area. Under such circumstances, runner could very 
well legally enter end zone without ball having 
crossed plane of goal line. The same thing might 
apply in a case where the runner in the end zone 
completes a forward pass while runner is inbounds 
but ball is caught while it is over out-of-bounds 
area. In order to cover these and avoid too many 
deviations from a fixed rule, the revised rule also 
covers a case where a runner with his feet on the 
2-foot line might fall fonvard to carry ball across 
the goal line extended. All of these cases result in 
a touchdown. While these are related to case cited, 
there is a difference in that diving runner is not 
touching any part of the field inbounds. In actual 
practice, such a dive would seldom be practical. If 
there is no opposition, there would be no purpose in 
the dive, and if there is opposition, runner would 
practically always be in grasp of tackier and such 
dive would be impossible. 

13. Play: After a team has used its fourth time- 
out, clock is stopped because Al has defective 
equipment which: (a) can be corrected on field by 
players or official without delay or (b) necessitates 
coach or trainer assistance or material of any kind 
from the bench for correction. 

Ruling: In either case, it is an official's time- 
out. Al need not be removed from the game in (a) 
but in (b) Al should leave the game and Official will 
penalize for delay if Al is not promptly replaced. 

14. Play: Official examines Al, who appears 



to be injured: (a) before or (b) after team A has 
had four charged time-outs. 

Ruling-: Clock is stopped in both (a) and (b) 
and Al must leave the game in either case. In (a) 
the time-out is charged to team A and the clock 
starts with a snap. In (b) it is an Official's time-out 
and the clock starts on the ready. 

15. Play: before his team's 4th time-out is 
charged, Captain Al asks for a time-out. Al does 
not indicate it is for an injured player. After clock 
is stopped. Official notices A2 may be injured. 
Trainer or coach may or may not come on field to 
examine or attend A2. 

Ruling: Time-out charged team A and clock 
will start with snap. A2 need not leave game unless 
he delays the ready signal. 

Comment: Art. 4, Sec. 4 requires that an in- 
jured player be removed if the clock was stopped 
for his injury. In such cases, the player is removed 
regaraless of wehther a player requested time or 
Officials stopped clock to examine player. If the 
clock was not stopped because of an indicated in- 
jured player, the player need not be removed from 
the game. 

16. Play: Linebacker Bl stands directly behind 
B6, who is on his line of scrimmage with his hand 
or hands on the back of B6. At the snap, Bl gives 
B6 a tremendous push into an opposing- lineman, 
forcing B6 several feet across the scrimmage line. 

Ruling: Foul. Act of Bl is unsportsmanlike. 

17. Play: Jerseys have below-the-elbow cuffs 
of a color which contrasts with sleeve color. 

Ruling: Illegal. Colored cuff is considered a 
trasverse stripe. 

18. Play: Head coach of team A goes onto field 
to assist injured Al off the field during a charged 
time-out. Assistant coach legally confers with A2 
near side line. As head coach comes off field, he 
replaces assistant coach and he continues conference 
with A2. 

Ruling: Foul. Only one player and one coach of 
each team may confer during a charged time-out. 
Official is authorized to prevent coach from com- 
mitting- a foul if he can. 

ly. Play: Team A is on the 15, 4th Down-12. 
Equipment manager throws a kicking tee onto the 
field. Al throws the tee back to the bench but 
team A lines up in place-kick formation and kicks 
a field-goal. 

Ruling: Foul. Coaching from the side line. 15- 
yard penalty. 



Age 

Age is a quality of mind; 

If you have left your dreams behind, 

If hope is cold, 

If you no longer look ahead, 

If your ambition's fires are dead, 

Then you are old. 

But if from life you take the best, 
And if in life you keep the zest, 
If love you hold. 
No matter how the years go by, 
No matter how the birthdays fly, 
You are not old. 

— Sparks 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1958 



First Aid Chart 



ABRASIONS, floor burns or cinder burns: 
Wash with soap and water. Hold under cold 
water faucet. Apply sterile gauze dressing. 
If extensive or deep, see physician. 

BLACK EYE : Apply ice bag or cold cloth 
for 30 minutes. If skin is broken, treat the 
same as a cut. If vision is impaired, see 
physician. 

BLISTERS, severe: Wash with soap and 
water. Protect from further friction. See 
physician. 

BONE BRUISES: Apply ice bag or cold 
cloth for 30' minutes. Protect from further 
injury with rubber pad taped over the area. 
If severe, see phvsician. 

BROKEN NOSE: Apply cold, wet cloths 
over the nose. Call physician at once. 

BROKEN TEETH: Cover with sterile 
gauze. If tooth or teeth are completely re- 
moved from socket, save. If displaced from 
normal position by trauma or if bone frag- 
ments appear around tooth, do not disturb. 
See dentist at once. 

BRUISES, CHARLEYHORSES and other 
contusions: Apply ice bag or cold cloth for 
30 minutes. Protect from further injui\v with 
sponge rubber pad taped over the area. If 
severe, see phvsician. 

CONCUSSION (knocked out) : Keep pa- 
tient flat. Check airway. Cover with blanket. 
Apply cold cloths to forehead. Call physician 
at once. 

CRAMPS, muscle: Contract antagonistic 
(opposite) muscles forcefully. Firm hand 
pressure on cramped muscle. If recurs, see 
physician. 

CUTS, open and small: Wash with soap 
and water. Hold under cold water faucet. 
Apply sterile gauze dressing. If bleeding is 
severe, or cuts are extensive, use sterile 
pressure bandage and see phvsician. 

DEBRIS IN EYE : Remove foreign bodies 
by gently touching with point of clean hand- 
kerchief or wash with cold water. Never rub 
eye. If unsuccessful, see physician. 

DISLOCATION: Gently apply ice bag or 
cold cloths to reduce swelling. Call physician 
at once. 

EXHAUSTION (heat): Place patient in 
shade with head low. Loosen clothing. Con- 
tact physician unless recovery is prompt 

FRACTURES : Do not move person if frac- 
ture of leg, back, head or skull is suspected. 
In all fractures, contact physician at once. 

KNOCKOUTS, solar plexus: Place patient 
on back. Loosen clothing around waist and 
chest. Moisten face with cold water. Call 



physician. 

LIMEBURNS. Wash thoroughly with wa- 
ter. Apply sterile gauze dressing and see 
phvsician, particularly if eye is involved. 

MOUTH WOUNDS (split lip and bitten, 
tongue) : Wash with cold water. If excessive 
bleeding, apply sterile gauze pressure pad 
and see phvsician or dentist. 

MUSCLE PULLS and STRAINS: Apply 
ice compresses, ice packs or cold cloths for 
30 minutes right after injury. Elevate in- 
jured part. If severe, see phvsician. 

SPIKE WOUNDS, CLEAT WOUNDS 
and other puncture wounds : Wash with soap 
and water. Hold under cold water faucet. 
Apply sterile gauze dressing and see phy- 
sician at once. 

SPRAINS: Support or elevate the injured 
part. Apply ice compresses, ice bag or cold 
cloths for 30 minutes right after the injury 
and apply pressure bandage. If swelling or 
discoloration is unusual, do not use injured 
part until seen by physician. 

SUNBURN (severe) : Apply sterile gauze 
dressing and see physician at once. 

SUNSTROKE: Place patient flat. Loosen 
clothing and keep in the shade. Sponge with 
cold water and call phvsician at once. 

TESTICULAR AREA (Scrotal) : Lay pa- 
tient down and apply ice bag or cold cloths 
to pain area. If recovery is not immediate, 
call physician. 

UNCONSCIOUSNESS: Never give any- 
thing by mouth. Place patient with head 
turned slightly to one side. Loosen clothing 
and call physician at once. 

— A.M. A. & National Federation 

(Adapted from Cal. Med. Ass'n. Chart) 



NATIONAL FEDERATION ANNUAL MEETING 

(Continued from Page Three) 

Secretary of the Mississippi Hig-h School Activities 
Association; and H. R. Peterson, Secretary of the 
Minnesota State High School League. 

Speakers and others who had an active part in 
the program included most of the State Executive 
Officers and many Board of Control officers and 
members. In addition, valuable presentations were 
made by the Reverend Bob Richards (Nationally- 
known Olympic pole vaulter and organizer of Youtlr 
Fitness programs); Dr. Arthur Corey (Executive 
Secretary of the California State Teachers' Associa- 
tion); Payton Jordan (Stanford University track 
coach); Milton Raymer (Executive Secretary of 
the Ameiican Junior Bowling Congress); Dr. Reed 
K. Swenson (President of the National Junior Col- 
lege Athletic Association); and Charles Smith 
(prominent pioneer in activities of the National 
Association of Intercollegiate Athletics). 

The Monday night session included a feature 
showing of the new film "Basketball for Millions" 
produced by the Official Sports Film Service under 
the supervision of Director W. M. Runyon. This 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1958 



Page Thirteen 



was followed by the showing of an interesting reel 
of pictures taken by Commissioner Lee K. Anderson 
(Oklahoma) at last year's annual meeting. 

The football session included a showing of the 
Football Film Strip planned by Secretary J. C. 
Harper (Alabama), supervised by the National 
Federation and produced by the Official Sports 
Film Service. 

The entire California Interscholastic Federation 
Board of Control and Officers of the seven California 
Sections were active in setting up the machinery 
which resulted in a smoothly running meeting. The 
California Interscholastic Federation and the Na- 
tional Federation pooled their resources in various 
entertainment features which included a luncheon 
for the young people on Monday Noon, a subsidized 
banquet on Monday Night, sight-seeing- trips to 
Josten's jewelry manufacturing plant, to the Santa 
Barbara Old Mission and to a nearby ranch, and a 
display of flowers and shrubs to delight the senses 
of those who are interested in plant life. A shuttle 
bus made several trips between the Miramar and 
motels and neighboring hotels where some of the 
Federation guests were quartered. 

One of the highlights of the conference was 
the Sunday afternoon informal reception in charge 
of the California Interscholastic Federation and 
supervised by Mrs. W. W. Russell, in cooperation 
with her efficient committee. The reception included 
an interesting reception line of individuals in the 
costume of the Spanish Pioneers in early California; 
exquisite orchids for each lady who attended; an 
unusually attractive program of music and costume 
dancing by the "Native Daughters of the Golden 
West"; light refreshments and friendly visiting. 
This excellently planned program served to start the 
series of meetings on the rig-ht track in an atmos- 
phere of friendliness and anticipation. 

The Executive Committee met at 8:00 P. M. 
Saturday and at 9:00 P. M. Thursday. At the Satur- 
day meeting, the resignation of C. H. Hancock of 
Great Falls, Montana was received. This resignation 
was presented by Mr. Hancock because his health 
had taken a turn for the worse and he felt it best 
to discontinue efforts which involve travel and the 
accompanying responsibilities. In accordance with 
the provisions of the Federation constitution, the 
Montana Board of Control named H. J. Goetz, of 
Ennis, Montana to serve on the Federation Execu- 



tive Committee until the election at the 1958 annual 
meeting. Mr. Goetz was officially seated as a mem- 
ber of the Committee. 

Also, at the Saturday night session, the Execu- 
tive Committee approved the request of Executive 
Secretary H. V. Porter that he retire as of July 31, 
1958. Associate Secretary C. B. Fagan was elected 
as Executive Secretary of the National Federation 
as of August 1. In view of the long' service of H. V. 
Porter as Federation Executive, the Executive Com- 
mittee unanimously voted to bestow on him the 
honorary titles of of National Federation Executive 
Secretary Emeritus and Secretary Emeritus of the 
National Alliance Football Committee. 

The leading address Sunday evening was given 
by the Reverend Bob Richards. The close attention 
of the entire group and the many requests for a 
synopsis of this address attest to its excellence. The 
evening session was concluded by calling the initiates 
to the platform where they received instructions 
as to requirements for the next day prior to their 
being inducted into the ranks as members of the 
Federation team. The initiates were: Supei-vising 
Director Hardy L. Pearce (Washington, D. C); 
Secretary James C. Cave (Sac-Joaquin Section, C. I. 
F.); Secretary Edwin A. Hendrix (Northern Section, 
C. I. F.); and Secretary Harold Olson (Central 
Section, C. I. F.). The committee in charge of the 
initiation ceremony was made up of C. E. Wetmore, 
Chm. (Wisconsin); H. W. Jennings (California); 
W. B. Jones (Kentucky); William C. Pace (Vir- 
ginia); and John Roberts (Wisconsin). 

The Monday Morning session was made up of 
two divisions which ran concurrently, with State 
Association Executive Officers meetitng in the 
Montecito Room and members of State Association 
Boards of Control in Convention Center. Each ses- 
sion convened at 9:00 A. M. and continued to 11:30 
A. M. 

The State Executive Officers' Session was called 
to order by presiding- officers Secretary W. W. 
Russell (California), Secretary Henry De Young 
(Washington) and Secretary E. F. Grider (Idaho). 
A report of "Increased Operational Costs of State 
Associations" was presented by Commissioner 
Glenn T. Wilson (Colorado). His comments were 
based upon the results of a questionnaire returned 
by each State Association. Charlie Smith (N. A. 
(Continued in October Issue of the ATHLETE) 



REPORT OF INSURANCE CLAIMS 

(Continued From August Issue of The Kentucky High School Athlete) 

School Claimant Injury 

Napier Ralph Carder Laceration - suture, X-ray 

Napier Ed Chaney X-ray 

Napier Kidd Fugate Knee injury (special) 

Napier Bill Joseph X-ray 

Napier .John Layne Chipped tooth. X-ray 

Napier .John Layne X-ray 

Napier Bobby Morgan X-ray 

Napier Harold Osborne X-ray 

Napier Kenneth Pelfry Fractured fibula 

Napier Johnny Pratt X-ray 

New Concord Joseph Green Chipped teeth, dental X-ray 

New Concord Dorsey Hendon X-ray 

New Concord Eddie Rowland X-ray 

New Concord Eddie Rowland X-ray 

Newport Catholic Richard Carr X-ray 

Newport Catholic Stanley Craddock Laceration - suture 

Newport Catholic Nick Dahinden X-ray 

Newport Catholic Owen Donovan Fractured clavicle 

Newport Catholic Ronald Fay Broken nose. X-ray 

Newport Catholic Gerald Glaser Broken rib. X-ray 

Newpoi-t Catholic Gerald Glaser X-ray 

Newpoi-t Catholic Larry Grause X-ray 

Newport Catholic Gerald Lape X-ray 



; Paid 

15.00 
6.00 
22.00 
6.00 
13.00 
6.00 
6.00 
10.00 
50.00 
7.50 
10.00 
6.00 
B.OO 
5.00 
10.00 
5.00 
25.00 
35.00 
30.00 
15.00 
10.00 
12.00 
10.00 



Page Fourteen THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1958 

Newport Catholic James McCarthy Le^ injury (special) 16.00 

Newport Catholic John Poston Dislocated knee 14.50 

Newport Catholic Dennis Rosenhagen Broken rib. X-ray 18.50 

Newport Catholic Dennis Rosenhagen X-i'ay 10.00 

Newport Catholic Paul Schrieber X-ray 10.00 

Newport Catholic Dave Schultz Leg injury (special) 58.78 

Newport Catholic David Taueber X-ray 5.00 

Newport Catholic Charles Vaughn X-ray 15.00 

Newport Catholic William White X-ray 10.00 

Newport Catholic Carl Wiedemann X-ray 10.00 

Newport Jim Bird X-ray 7.00 

Newport Herbert Bonner Laceration - suture 5.00 

Newport Gari-y Buck X-ray 6.00 

Newport Mai-vin Farrar X-ray 10.00 

Newport Walter Feldcamp X-ray 4.00 

Newport Rodney Gross Replacement of filling 4.00 

Newport Angelo Hall Laceration - suture 5.00 

Newport Larry Harden X-ray 10.00 

Newport Jerry Jones X-ray 10.00 

Newport Bill Knapp Broken nose, X-ray 30.00 

Newport Dick Lienhardt X-ray 10.00 

Newport Jim McLaughlin Knee injury (special) 14.88 

Newport Robert Neal X-ray 6.00 

Newport Bill Quigley X-ray 6.00 

Newport Jerry Sanzenbacker Fractured tibia 50.00 

Newport Richard Schultz X-ray 6.00 

Newport Jerry Scott X-ray 8.00 

Newport Richard Sheets Elbow injury (special) 15.00 

Newport Ronald Storn, Jr Fractured humerus 75.00 

Newport Harold Strunk X-ray 6.00 

Newport Mike StuU Broken tooth 5.00 

Newport Mike Stull Fractured fibula 50.00 

Newport Robert Turner X-ray 6.00 

Newport Richard Wallace X-ray 10.00 

Newport Richard Wallace X-ray 10.00 

Newport John Williams Dislocated shoulder 29.00 

Nicholasville Carl Hatton X-ray 10.00 

Nicholasville Carl E. Hatton X-ray 6.00 

Nicholasville Fred Hopper Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Nicholasville Billy Lamb X-ray 10.00 

Nicholasville Ronald Dean Reid Head injury (special) 73.35 

Nicholasville Herbert Royse X-ray 20.00 

North Middletown Jesse Reed X-ray 15.00 

North Warren Charles Elrod Lacei-ation - suture 5.00 

North Warren Billy Joe Helton Broken nose 20.00 

North Warren Leon Lewis Laceration - suture 5.00 

North Warren Billy Watt Broken toe 15.00 

Oil Springs Harry Rntliff, Jr X-ray 6.00 

Old Kentucky Home Glenn Brown Knee injury (special) 21.63 

Old Kentucky Home James Greer Knee injury (special) 20.00 

Old Kentucky Home James Greer Loss of tooth 25.00 

Old Kentucky Home Bobby Shropshire Fractured humerus 74.00 

Old Kentucky Home Fred Williams Knee injury (special) 21.63 

Oldham County Bruce Bierman Laceration - suture 5.00 

Oldham County Pete Brooks X-ray 15.00 

Oldham County Lowell Coates Laceration - suture 5.00 

Oldham County Ronald Martin Laceration - suture 5.00 

Oldham County Ronald Martin X-ray 10.00 

Oldham County Mike Rohde X-ray 6.00 

Oldham County Larry Stanley Fractured rib. X-ray 20.00 

Olive Hill Herman Roe Loss of tooth 25.00 

Oneida Institute Irvin Weidner, Jr Laceration - suture 5.00 

Owen County Ed Godby Finger injury (special) 25.00 

Owsley County Robert Gay X-ray 6.00 

Owsley County Robert Gay Laceration - suture. X-ray 15.00 

Paducah Tilghman Bill Alexander X-ray 10.00 

Paducah Tilghman Bill Alexander Leg injury (special) 134.00 

Paducah Tilghman Roy Bryant Ankle injury (special) 17.50 

Paducah Tilghman Nelson Campbell Fractured radius and ulna 75.00 

Paducah Tilghman Mike Clark X-ray 12.00 

Paducah Tilghman Charles Evans X-ray 6.00 

Paducah Tilghman Ronnie Hooker Knee injury (special) 177.00 

Paducah Tilghman .James Jennings X-ray 6.00 

Paducah Tilghman Louis Kirchhoff X-ray 6.00 

Paducah Tilghman Louis Kirchhoff Head injury (special) 26.00 

Paducah Tilghman Louis Kirchhoff X-ray 15.00 

Paducah Tilghman Simon Michelson X-ray 12.00 

Paducah Tilghman Simon Michelson X-ray 6.00 

Paducah Tilghman Ronald Morgan Dental injury (special) 64.00 

Paducah Tilghman David Reed X-ray - 6.00 

Paducah Tilghman Bill Smith X-ray 15.00 

Paducah Tilghman Craig Stubblefield Broken finger 10.00 

Paducah Tilghman Bernard Vaughn Laceration -suture 5.00 

Paducah Tilghman Ronnie Walker Fractured metacarpal 20.00 

Paducah Tilghman Ward Willingham X-ray 6.00 

Paint Lick Bobby Ballard Kidney injury 27.50 

Paint Lick Harold Dean Hunt Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Paintsville Eugene Baldridge X-ray 7.50 

Paintsville Delmas Fraley X-ray 10.01) 

Paintsville Bill Hensley Broken finger. X-ray 22.00 

Paintsville Pat Hensley X-ray 6.00 

Paintsville Patrick Dale Hensley Loss of teeth (special) 67.00 

Paintsville James Leland Hooper Fractured clavicle 25.00 

Paintsville Roscoe Spears X-ray 15.00 

Paintsville Jim Wells Dental iniury (specal) 35.00 

Park City Bobbv Carey Dental injury (special) 27.50 

Park City Gale Wood Broken nose 20.00 

Perryville Richard Engle Laceration - suture 5.00 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1958 Page Fifteen 

Perryville Richard Glasscock X-ray 8.00 

Pineville Phillip Akers X-ray 5.00 

Pineville Jerry Baker Kidney injury 14.00 

Pineville Carl Culton Elbow injury (special) 158.70 

Pineville Danny Haley X-ray 6.00 

Pineville T. F. Hendrickson X-ray 5.00 

Pineville Richard Park Fractured clavicle 15.00 

Pineville Eddie Turner X-ray 6.00 

Pineville Darwin Walters X-ray 6.00 

Prestonsburg Larry Garrett X-ray 15.00 

Prestonsburg Ted Tackett Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Pulaski County Elwood Hunt Laceration - suture 5.00 

Pulaski County Harvey H. Stigail X-ray 6.00 

Pulaski County Lloyd Tucker X-ray 6.00 

Richardsville Paul DeVoi'e Laceration - suture 5.00 

Richardsville Amos Runner Foot injury (special) 59.43 

Rineyville Randall Sells Loss of tooth 25.00 

Rockhold Frank Alsip Nose injury (special) 75.00 

Rockhold Ova H. Brown Dislocated hip 25.00 

Rockhold Johnie Terrell X-ray 5.00 

Rockhold Charles A. Widner X-ray 10.00 

Russellville Jack Daneil X-ray 12.00 

Russellville Jerry Estes X-ray 215.00 

Russellville Jerry Estes X-ray 20.00 

Russellville Bertram Gass X-ray 20.00 

Russellville Don McCormick X-ray 12.00 

Russellville James Earl Miller Knee injury (special) 18.00 

Russellville James M. Todd Broken finger. X-ray 22.00 

St. Agatha John Sampson Loss of tooth 25.00 

St. Agnes Lawrence Gibson Loss of teeth 50.00 

St. Camillus Paul VanLandingham Frrctured fibula 50.00 

St. Charles Spalding White Loss of tooth 27.00 

Sedalia Ray Hendon Knee iniury - requiring surgery 75.00 

Sedalia _.__.- _. 

Shelbyville 
Shelbyville 
Shelbyville 
Shelbyville 
Shelbyville 
Shelbyville 
Shelbyville 
Shelbyville 
Shelbyville 
Shelbyville 
Shelbyville 
Shelbyville 
Shelbyville 
Shelbyv 



John Ed Pritchard Fractured metacarpal 19.00 

John Brown X-ray 15.00 

Frankie Cowherd X-ray 10.00 

Chester Ethington Broken nose 16.00 

Don Ethington Head injury (special) 15.50 

Bill Frye X-ray 15.00 

Steve Gilreath Fractured fibula 32.00 

Kenny Gravett Knee injury (special) 20.50 

Mike Green X-ray 7.50 

Woody Hackworth Ankle injury (special) 21.75 

Gregory Harrod X-ray 12.00 

Buddy Marshall X-ray 12.00 

Evan Settle III X-ray 12.00 

Evan Settle HI Loss of tooth 25.00 

Evan Settle HI X-ray 12.00 

Shelbyville Bonnie Swigert Dental injury (special) 27.50 

Shelbyville Jim Swigert X-ray 12.00 

Shelbyville Morty Webb Shoulder injury (special) 34.50 

Shelbyville Danny Wilson X-ray 12.00 

Shepherdsville Jerry Davis X-ray 10.00 

Shepherdsville Jerry Davis X-ray 10.00 

Shepherdsville Raymond Hawkins Laceration - suture, X-ray 17.00 

Shepherdsville Delbert Tracy X-ray 12.00 

Shepherdsville James Wagoner ^ X-ray 12.00 

Shepherdsville Jackie Yeager Broken finger. X-ray 22.00 

Slaughters Don Boles X-ray 17.50 

Somerset Richard Allen Broken tooth, X-ray 24.00 

Somerset Ronnie Baker Dislocated shoulder 16.00 

Somerset Ronnie Baker X-ray 10.00 

Somerset David Bodie Dislocated shoulder 20.00 

Somerset Joe Brown , Fractured metacarpal 15.00 

Somerset William Coffey Broken finger. X-ray 15.00 

Somerset Harold Davis Broken rib. X-ray 18.00 

Somerset Elray Edwards Loss of tooth 25.00 

Somerset David Graybeal Broken tooth 20.00 

Somerset David Isabell Laceration - suture 5.00 

Somerset Bob Woddle Fractured metacarpal 20.00 

Sonora Robert Edwin Ash X-ray 10.00 

Southern William Delph Knee injury (special) 33.00 

Southern Lynn Griffin Broken facing 5.00 

Southern Leon Howell . Laceration - suture 5.00 

Southern David Pachini Broken finger. X-ray 17.00 

Southern William Paschal Dental injury (special) 81.50 

Southern Graham Paul Laceration - suture 6.00 

Southern Henry Schmidt Knee iniury (special) 23.60 

Southern George Stuckenberg Knee injury (special) 31.50 

Springfield Tommy Dowling X-ray _ __ fi.OO 

Springfield Robert I,ee Eddleman, Jr X-ray ___ 10.00 

Springfield James Walter Grider Broken ribs 22 00 

Springfield Bobby Hourigan X-ray 10.00 

Springfield Ronnie Kimberlin Fractured metacarpal 13.00 

Springfield Joseph Donahue Polin Fractured tibia 60.00 

Stanford David Campbell Leg iniury (special) 16.00 

Stanford .Tohn D'sney Laceration - suture 5.00 

Stanford Billy Gilbert X-ray 12.00 

Stanford Henry Clay Long Laceration - suture 6.00 

Stanford Harvey Navlor X-ray 5.00 

Sunfish .Tames V. Hayes X-ray _ _ 12 00 

Sunfish Larry Key X-ray 12.00 

Symsonia Jerald Ellington Fractured fibula ___ _ _ 60.00 

Symsonia Talley L. Holshouser X-ray __ ___ _ 10.00 

Taylor County David Roberts Loss of teeth 50 00 

Taylor County Bobby Foots Loss of tooth ___ 25.00 

Temple Hill Morris Harlow Head injury (snecial) 23..';0 

Todd County Paul Shemwell Fractured patella __ _ 15.00 



Page Sixteen THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1958 

Todd County Eugene Shumate, Jr Laceration - suture 3.00 

Todd County Harold Snead Laceration - suture 5.00 

Todd County Bruce Wilson Fractured tarsal. X-ray 35.00 

Todd County Trng Charles E. Edmonds X-ray 20.00 

Todd County Trng Phillip Waters X-ray 12.00 

Tompkinsville Charles Miller X-ray 9.00 

Tompkinsville Joe Russell X-ray 6.00 

Tompkinsville Larry Tooley Fractured ulna 30.00 

Trigg County Jimmy Cherry Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Trigg County Aubrey Morris Broken teeth 40.00 

Trigg County John King Sills Broken tooth. X-ray 22.00 

Tyner Charles Cook Broken nose 5.00 

University Ernest Clarke III Laceration - suture 5.00 

University Lanny Co.-c X-ray 12.00 

Utica Ronnie Northern X-ray 6.00 

Utica Norman Pavton Knee injury (special) 15.25 

Utica Norman Payton Eye injury 10.00 

Utica Ronnie Salmon Broken nose, X-ray 26.00 

Valley Bill Allison X-ray 10.00 

Valley Wayne Bain X-ray 7.50 

Valley Bill Baker X-ray 6,00 

Valley Bill Baker Head laceration -suture, X-ray 20.00 

Valley Kenneth Baker Loss of tooth 5.00 

Valley Emmett Beams X-ray 9.00 

Valley Michael Bruckert X-ray 6.00 

Valley Jerry Carby X-ray 6.00 

Valley Jesse Ellis X-ray 5.00 

Valley Jerry Fowler Head injury (special) 29.50 

Valley Bobby Grasch Leg injury (special) 414.08 

Valley Virgil Hall X-ray 6.00 

Valley Stanley Hicks Ankle injury (special) 18.00 

Valley Richard Hunter X-ray 6.00 

Valley Rodney LaMastus Fractured metatarsal. X-ray 31.00 

Valley George A. Miller X-ray 20.00 

Valley Michael Mullins Arm injury (special) 92.50 

Valley Ronnie Peccola X-ray 12.00 

Valley Kenneth Quire X-ray 10.00 

Valley Jerry Redmon X-ray 10.00 

Valley Evan Roberts Laceration - suture 5.00 

Valley Bill Segrest X-ray 6.00 

Valley Eugene Speer Disslocated shoulder 35.00 

Valley Ronald Steele X-ray 10.00 

Versailles Jim Hall Fractured fibula 60.00 

Versailles Tom Meeks Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Virgie Bernard Collier X-ray 6.00 

Waggener Steve Catlett X-ray 12.00 

Waggener Bobby Clarke X-ray 6.00 

Waggener. Bob Hackney X-ray 10.00 

Waggener Pat Malone Finger injury (special) 30.00 

Waggener Eddie Morris Finger injury (special) 35.00 

Waggener Fred Neikirk X-ray 6.00 

Waggener Bobby Sexton X-ray 6.00 

Waggener David Simpson X-ray 20.00 

Waggener George Tr'bble, Jr Finger injury (special) 30.00 

Wallins Trumsn Blanton Loss of teeth 50.00 

Wallins Donald Havwood Dislocated wrist 18.00 

Wallins Je<ise T. Herrell Dislocated wrist 16.00 

Wallins Johnnv Morgan Loss of teeth 60.00 

Wallins Don Savior Chest injury (special) 17.00 

Warfield Roy Allen Broken nose. X-ray 37.00 

Warren County Jack Hodges X-ray 6.00 

Wayland Jackie Stanford Fractured clavicle 27.00 

West Main Street Frazier P. Simmons X-ray 6.00 

Wheelwright Roger Baker Laceration - suture 5.00 

Wheelwright Louis Ferrari Elbow injury (special) 17.75 

Wheelwright Claude Hall Dental injury (special) 17.50 

Wheelwright Claude Hall X-ray 15.00 

Wheelwright Mai'or Reed Hall Broken finger. X-ray 22.00 

Whitesburg Carlos Brown Back injury (special) 120.75 

Whitesburg Bobby Holbrook X-ray 20.00 

Whitesburg Roger Kincer X-ray 10.00 

Whitesburg Roger Kincer Fractured humerus 27.00 

Whitesburg Ronald Sergent Loss of tooth 25.00 

Whitesburg Paul Estes Sparks Laceration - suture 5.00 

Whitesburg Windle Snarks Broken facing 10.00 

Whitesburg Darrell .'^tidham X-ray 10.00 

Whitesburg Robert Wright Nose injury (special) 117.60 

Williamsburg Garvv Croley Broken nose 20.00 

Williamsburg Ralph Honkins Nasal iniury (snecial) 60.00 

Williamsburg Elmer Patrick Broken finger. X-ray 16.00 

Williamsburg Carl Tmssell Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Winchester .Tames Chenaiilt Broken teeth 40.00 

Winchester John Chenault X-ray 8.00 

Winchester Gavle Jones X-ray 12.00 

Winchester Robert Sewell Nasal injury (special) 17.50 

Woodbine Bill Cotter Ankle injury (special) 27.26 

Woodbine Enoch Gihhs X-ray 7.50 

Woodbine Kenneth Pennington X-ray 10.00 

Wiirtland Donald Wellman Fractured fibula 50.00 

Official Rhea P. Lazarus Eye injury (special) 18.00 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

SERVICE 
IS OUR MIDDLE NAME 



Whether your order is for a few special items or for outfitting a complete 
team, we give undivided and personal attention to every order that comes 
to our store. 

As distributors for the VERY BEST MANUFACTURERS of athletic goods, 
namely : 

MACGREGOR HILLERICH & BRADSBY 

SPALDING WIGWAM 

KING-0'SHEA NELSON 

RIDDELL POWERS 

VOIT GENERAL 

FAIR PLAY WILSON 

WILTON DODGE 

E. R. MOORE CO. AMERICAN PLAYGROUND 

NISSEN TRAMPOLINE J & J 

SEAMLESS SOUTHERN 

BIKE SPANJIAN 

CRAMER LYON METAL 

We try to make our SERVICE match the quality of the items we sell. Each 
and every item we sell is fully guaranteed. 

If you would like to see our salesman for either football or basketball 
supplies, call us at 103 or 104. 

ROY BOYD, JIM MITCHELL, BILL HUNT, C. A. BYRNE, JR., or BOBBY 
SEXTON are always in our store ready to assist you in every way possible. 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 
103 — PHONE — 104 

Wp SHiplTie DaVVou BuV 




Order ^ow! 



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THE 







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COMPANY, INC. 
ISVILLE 1. KENTUCKY 





Hiqh khool AHiMe 



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^he i^po^tsman s Creed 



The Player . . . 



1. He lives clean and plays hard. He plays for the love of the game. 

2. He wins without boasting, he loses without excuses, and h6 never quits. 

3. He respects officials and accepts their decisions without question. 

4. He never forgets that he represents his school. 



r 



The Coach 



1. He inspires in his boys a love for the game and the desire to win. 

2. He teaches them that it is better to lose fairly than to win unfairly. 

3. He leads players and spectators to respect officials by setting them a 
good example. 

4. He is the type of man he wants his boys to be. 



The Official 



1. He knows the rules. 

2. He is fair and firm in all decisions. He calls them as he sees them. 

3. He treats players and coaches courteously and demands the same 
treatment for himself. 

4. He knows the game is for the boys, and lets them have the spotlight. 



The Spectator 




1. He never boos a player or official. 

2. He appreciates a good play, no matter who makes it. 

3. He knows the school gets the blame or the praise for his conduct. 

4. He recognizes the need for more sportsmen and fewer "sports." 



Omcial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 



OCTOBER 



19 55 





H. V. Porter 



National Secretary Retires 

At the National 
Federation Conven- 
tion, held on June 
22-26, 1958, Mr. H. 
V. Porter, Execu- 
tive Secretary, an- 
nounced his retire- 
ment, effective Au- 
gust 1, 1958. Mr. 
Porter has been con- 
nected with the na- 
tional organization 
since 1928, and has 
l)een its secretary 
since 1940, the year 
in which the na- 
tional office was or- 
ganized full time. 

Statements concerning Mr. Porter's activ- 
ities, appearing in some of the other state 
publications, follow: 

"Mr. Porter assumed his position when 
the National Federation was in its infancy, 
and over the period of years intei'vening he 
has built the Federation into a very strong 
and influential national organization. By 
aggressive leadership, intelligent under- 
standing of the purpose and function of ath- 
letics in educational institutions, and by 
wise and effective counselling the National 
Federation under his guidance developed a 
service program to the states and schools 
which is unique throughout the entire 
world." — Minnesota Bulletin. 

"Mr. Porter's contributions to the high 
school athletic scene are so varied and so 
numerous that space and time hardly permit 
even a partial listing. The fan-shaped basket- 
ball backboard, now standard equipment in 
most high school gymnasiums ; the molded 
basketball, the first really round ball; a 
well organized, understandable rules code 
for high school baseball playei's ; football 
and basketball rules that are logical syste- 
matic and adapted to the needs of high school 
boys — all these, and many others, are the 
product of H. V.'s inventive genius and were 
developed after years of patient and pains- 



taking study and research." — The Illinois 
Interscholastic. 

"Porter's financial management of the 
Federation has been the subject for praise 
for years. The amount of dues paid by each 
state is vei'v small and the excellent financial 
position of the Federation has been due to 
H. V.'s business ability and investment policy 
— an outstanding contribution in the field 
of sports rule codification is another of Por- 
ter's accomplishments. Rules books, case 
books, player handbooks, officials manuals 
and a host of other publications have been 
developed through bis leadership .... His 
genius for codification and organization is 
recognized by all." — The Pa'thlete. 

"Mr. Porter has been given an honorary 
title of Executive Secretary Emeritus of the 
National Federation in recognition of the 
fine work he has done for the Association. 
His contributions to the Federation and to 
high school inter-school athletics have been 
great and many." — The Colorado Inter- 
scholastic. 

"Mr. Porter leaves a lasting impression 
upon those who knew him and worked with 
him durinff his years in office. His efforts 
have left their mark and his work has had 
a nation-wide influence in the field of high 
school athletics." — The Wisconsin Bulletin. 

Clifford B. Fao'an, Association Executive 
Secretary of the National Federation since 
January 1, 1957. h«s been elected to succeed 
Mr. Porter. Cliff came to the National 
Federation from the position of Executive 
Secretary of the Wisconsin Interscholastic 
Athletic Association, a post he held for nine 
years. 

Fagan received his Bachelor's degree from 
Wisconsin State College and his Master's 
degree from Iowa University. He specialized 
in physical education, athletics and school 
administration. 

Cliff comes to the National Federation 
with a rich backeround of training and ex- 
perience in the field of high school athletics. 

The Board of Control of the K.H.S.A.A., 
the administrative staff, and all Kentucky 
school men who have had the pleasure of 
meeting and knowing Mr. Porter through 
the years concur heartilv in all the nice 
things that are being said about him. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXI— NO. 3 



OCTOBER, 1958 



$1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Football Questions 

penalty, it will be K's ball 1st down-10 on R's 
25 yardline. If K refuses penalty, it will be 
1st down-10 on R's 40 yardline for K. 

27. Play : Guard Al, from a 3-point stance, 
leaves the line of scrimmage slightly prior 
to the snap. This action causes Bl to be 
offside. 

Ruling: False start by Al. 5-yard penalty. 
Only false start is penalized. 

28. Play : With clock running, Team B Cap- 
tain insists to Official that Al is playing 
with a forearm plaster cast which is covered 
by jersey sleeve. Official stops clock to make 
examination which reveals contention of 
Captain Bl to be true. 

Ruling: Official's time-out. Al is removed 
from the game. Al must be replaced im- 
mediately. Clock is started with ready-for- 
play signal. 

Comment: All time-outs for equipment 
start as an Official's time-out. A player's re- 
quest for an equinment time-out is inter- 
preted as calling the Official's attention to 
faultv equipment. In certain situations, such 
as when the repair of faulty equipment re- 
quires assistance of a team attendant or it 
excessively delays the ready-for-play signal, 
the time-out is transferred to the team and 
charged to it unless, of course, the team 
has already had four charged time-outs. 
There is no distinction between correcting 
legal and illegal equipment as far as the 
time-out factor is concerned. If, in the above 
plav, Al is not immediatetly replaced, the 
Official could laenalize for delay of game. 

29. Play: 4th down-5 on B's 20. Snap re- 
ceiver Al, with knee on ground, catches ball 
on B's 28 and nlaces it for place-kick. Before 
A2 can kick ball, Bl breaks through and 
kicks it out of A's hands. B2 recovers on 
B's 35. 

Ruling: Illeo^al kicking. Bl intentionally 
kicked the ball other than during a legal 
kick. For all purposes other than place-kick- 
ing by A2, the ball became dead when Al 
caught it with his knee on the ground. It is 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or 
modify any rule. They are interpretations on some 
of the early season situations which have been 
presented. 

Installment II 

21. Play: Team A fair catches and elects to 
snap. During succeeding down in which ball 
was snapped, team B fouls. After measure- 
ment, team A wishes to free-kick. 

Ruling: Request should not be granted. 
First choice of team A is final. Ball must be 
put in play by snap. 

22. Play: Home team A provides official 
leather ball. At beginning of first half team 
B elects to use rubber ball but wishes to 
change to leather ball for second quarter. 

Ruling: Unless rubber ball becomes de- 
fective, team B must snap or free-kick it 
throughout half. 

23. Play: Snapper tilts ball until it is vir- 
tually perpendicular to ground. 

Ruling: Legal if long axis of ball is at 
right angle to a line passing through the 
point of the ball and parallel to the scrim- 
mage line. 

24. Play: During try-for-point, all linemen 
of A lock legs with adjacent teammates. 

Ruling: Illegal position. 5 yard penalty. 

25. Play: 3rd down-20 on K's 20 yardline. 
Scrimmage-kick by Kl touches Rl on K's 
30. Kick rebounds behind line where lineman 
K6 recovers ball and throws forward pass 
across the line of scrimmage to ineligible 
K7 on K's 25. K7 is downed on K's 45. ^ 

Ruling: Pass interference by K7, If R ac- 
cepts penalty, it will K's ball, 1st down-10 
on K's 5 yardline. If R declines penalty, it 
will be K's ball, 1st down-10 on K's 45. 

Comment: R's touching ended series of 
downs. An ineligible player may throw a 
forward pass. 

26. Play: 4th down-15 on R's 40. K's scrim- 
mage-kick touches Rl on R's 30 and rebounds 
behind the line where K2 throws an incom- 
nlete forward pass. While pass is in the air, 
R2 strikes K2 with his elbow. 

Ruling: Disqualify R2. If K accepts the 



(Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1958 



OCTOBER, 1958 VOL. XXI— NO. 3 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60). Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Directors— W. B. Jones. (1957-61) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
(1958-62) Franklin: Jack Dawson (1958-62), Louisville; Robert 
P. Forsythe (1955-59), Greenville: K. G. Gillaspie (1955-59), 
Georgetown: Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jrom the Covnvnlsslonei s Dffl 



ice 



The Cross Country Run 

The K.H.S.A.A. will attempt to set up six 
regional cross country meets, scheduled to be 
held on Saturday, November 1, 1958. The 
sites are Paducah, Bowling Green, Louisville, 
Bellevue, Berea, and Morehead. Entry blanks 
will be sent to the principals of all member 
schools who have indicated that they plan 
to sponsor cross country teams this year. 
The state cross country run is scheduled to 
be held in Lexington on November 15. 

Employment Bureaus 

Sixteen employment bureaus for officials 
have been established. Each I'egistered of- 
ficial should file at once with his bureau head 
and/or the nearest bureau head his schedule 
of games and a list of dates on which the 
official will be available to call games. Al- 
though the bureaus have been set up primari- 
ly for basketball, the men in charge will be 
glad to assist officials and schools in filling 
open football dates. The names of the bureau 
heads, with their residence and business 
phone numbers are as follows: 

Region 1. Rex Alexander, Murray State 
College, Murray State College, Murray ; Res. 
No. 1292W; Bus. No. 740. 

Region 2. Amos Teague, Homewood Dr., 
Madisonville ; Res. No. Ta 1-4639; Bus. No. 
740, Ext. 15. 

Region 3. Roy Settle, 1413 St. Mary's Ave., 
Owensboro; Res. No. Mu 3-2136; Bus. No. 
Mu 3-3574. 

Region 4. Joe Richardson, 210 York Street, 
Greenville; Res. No. 1077W; Bus. No. 48. 

Region 5. James Jenkins, Route 1, Bowling 
Green; Res. No. 2-5954. 

Region 6. Howard Gardner, 307 Poplar Dr., 
Elizabethtown ; Res. No. 4451 ; Bus. No. Ft. 
Knox 4654. 

Region 7. Dave Longenecker, 8910 Olympic 



Ave., Louisville; Res. No. Tw 6-9071; Bus. 
No. Tw 5-3401. 

C. 0. Ricketts, 10217 Starlight Way, Valley 
Station; Res. No. Wa 1-9583; Bus. No. Me 
4-1551. 

Region 8. Elmo Head, 113 Alton, Shelby- 
ville; Res. No. 1273 W; Bus No. 142. 

Region 9. John Schaar, Bellevue; Res. No. 
Co 1-5069; Bus. No. Co 11-2980. 

Region 10. Bennie Bridges, North Middle- 
town; Res. No. 4392. 

Region 11. Harry Stephenson, 2210 Circle 
Drive, Lexington ; Res. No. 4-9620 ; Bus. No. 
4-2431. 

Region 12. Bob McLeod, Somerset; Res. 
No. 571 ; Bus. No. 545. 

Region 13. Bill Nau, Barbourville ; Res. No. 
203; Bus. No. 317. 

Region 14. Arnett tSrong, 425 Cedar, Haz- 
ard; Res. No. 389; Bus. No. 3300. 

Region 15. Dick Looney, Riverview Dr., 
Pikeville; Res. No. Ge 7-6410. 

Region 16. Ernie Chattin, 2147 Central, 
Ashland; Res. No. Ea 4-2665; Bus. No. 4- 
6191. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers arc given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Baird, Daniel M., 8541 Mervis Ct., Norfolk, Va., JU 7-0698 
Baker, Charles J., 2547 Harrison, Paducah, 3-3043, 5-6311 
Barry, Gerald E., 1013 Kent St., Portsmouth, Ohio, Elmwood 

3-1111, Ext. 275 (Bus. No.) 
Bell, Thomas P., 1843 Glenhill Dr., Lexington, 2-2958, 2-1477 
Black, Charles D., 138 Pine, Barbourville, 193, 341 
Bond, Jack C, 2057 Clays Mill, Lexington, 7-2351, 2-2250, 

Ext. 2766 
Broderick, Carroll A., P. O. Box 346, Bowling Green, 2-5636, 

3-8212 
Caldwell, Charles M., 2790 Latulla Ave., Huntington 2, W. Va. 
Chambers. Dan. Jr.. Matewan Nat'l Bank. Matewan, W. Va. 
Chaput, Louis E., 410 College, Elizabethtown, RO 5-7069, 

RO 5-52S6 
Coleman, L. J. "Duke", Jr.. 2564 Southview. Lexington, 7-3672, 

3-0885 
Corea, Frank, Williamson, W. Va. 
Corrao, Phillip J., 29 Coyle Dr., New Albany, Ind., WH 47584, 

BU 37505, Jeffersonville 
Coulter, William M.. 807 Taylor Ave., Evansville, Ind., HA 

24191, HA 37510 
Cowan, Robert L.. 918 So. 43rd, Louisville, SP 8-3360, SP 6-143G 
Davis, Charlie, Benham, VI 8-2093, VI 8-5406 
Davis, Clyde E., 2531 E. Euclid. Ashland, EA 4-7804 
Day, Jon W., Gary Club House, Gary, W. Va. 
Deaton. Dan, Matewan, W. Va. 
DeVault. Don. 3017 E. Walnut St.. Evansville, Ind., HA 5-6252, 

OR 6-1696 
Dixie, Cornelius, 608 So. Clay, Louisville JU 7-7680 
Drake, Richard Ray. 61 Edwards Ct., Ft. Thomas, HI 1-4235 
Elovitz, Carl. 1920 Spring Grove, Lexington, 7-3994, 720 

Versailles 
Gilly, Joe G., Harlan, 1576 J. 622 

Gorham, Robert J., 174 St. James. Lexington, 26610, 40503 
Greene, Paul "Dutch", 1335 Grandview Dr., Ashland, EA 4-9216, 

EA 4-4107 
Greenslait, James W.. 600 Brown St., Raceland 
Grooms. Randall. B-103 Shawneetown, Lexington 
Haffey, Stan, 1234 Garden Circle, Cincinnati, Ohio, PO 1-2884, 

PO 1-2884 
Hale, Don C, Box 127, Berea, 1053 
Hale, John, 470 Poplar, Harlan 

Harri.s, Russell, 368 Boiling Springs, Lexington, 4-6525 
Hatfield, Cecil, P. O. Box 844, Berea College. Berea, 845-R 
Hentzberger, Robert, 2735 Mar-on. Evansville. Indiana. 4-1681 
Hunter, Donald B,, P. O. Box 404, Murray. 2250 R, 740, Ext, 210 
Hutchens, Ross, Box 83, Sophia, W. Va. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1958 



Page Three 



Jeter, John B., 1702 Versailles Road, Lexington, 4-9935, 3-2464 
Kauf£man, Victor C. 3635 W. 8th Street, Cincinnati 5, Ohio, 

Wa 1-9230, Po 1-4100, Ext. 1803 
Kimble, Frank, Williamson, W. Va. 
Lancaster Morris B., 106 Penmoken Pk., Lexington, 7-2965, 

4-3644 
Lawson, Carl E., Ivy Hill, Harlan, 1327, 136 
Liber, James, 39 Glen Este, Cincinnati, Ohio, AV 13686, 

TW 17777 
McConachie, Bryon E., 1703 Herbert Ave., Louisville, Em 

8-6621 (Bus. No.) 
McGlasson, Eugenj M., 61 Brentmoor Ln., Anchorage, CH 

5-8554, JU 7-6538 
Marushi, Rudy, 651 Stratton St., Logan, W. Va. 
Melmige, James, Jr., Matewan, W. Va. 
Messerian, Nishan, P. O. Box 3225, Univ. of Ky., Lexington, 

Williamson, W. Va., 1973, U. of Ky. 2-2200, Ext. 3447 
Miller, William A., 1601 Shelbv Avenue, Evansville, Ind., 

GR 6-9642, HA 5-7276 
Morrissey, Rockne, 549 Rosemont, Cincinnati 5, Ohio, WA 1-4418, 

WA 1-3240 
Mudd, Ed, 3512 Mildred Drive, Louisville, SP 6-6888 
Oakley, Bill, 4 Senate Ave., Morganfield, 295 
O'Nan, Norman, 3020 Elmwood, Henderson, 7-3455, 7-3968 
Pence, William M., 438 S. Wilson Rd., Radcliff, Ft. Knox 6767 

(Bus. No.) 
Pinson, Eugene, 3208 Hackworth, Ashland, EA 4-6548, EA 4-3101 
Radjunas, Stan, 1644 Ell.ott, Ashland, EAst 4-1896 
Raitt, William C, 2531 Bremont Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, RG 

1-6379, CH 1-7600 
Ray, Shirley G., 3035 San Juan Dr., Owensboro, MU 3-7663 
Rentz, Thomas W., 335 Transylvania Pk., Lexington, 41091, 

32880 
Robertson, Everett, 341 Etna, Russell, Oak 328 
Rogers, John B., 832 12th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Rudolph, Fred, Jr., 1020 Parkway Dr., Louisville, ME 40737, 

ME B7441 
St. Charles, Thomas A., 1409 Grandview Dr., Nashville 12, 

Tenn., CY 2-9958, AL 5-5497 
Sallee, Alan Lee, 1737 Deer Park Ave., Louisville 5, HI 6194 
Schellhase, David, 1630 Wedeking, Evansville, Ind., HA 59790 
Schlich, Paul, 3160 Talisman Rd., Louisville, Gl 86765, Tw 60211 
Schutz, John J., Jr., Hickory Grove, New Albany, WH 46984 
Selvy, Curt, Corbin 624-W, 1333 

Sloan, Earl D., 108 Diane Ct., Madison, Tenn., 7-6316 
Smith, J. E., 314 Cecil Ave., Louisille, SP 4-3030, JU 7-9131 
Snook, J. Patrick, 3606 St. Germaine, Louisville, Tw 3-3708 
Sparks, Harry M., 1318 Wells Blvd., Murray, 1848, 740 
Stephens, Robert, Box 529, Montgomery, W. Va. 
Stephenson, Harry, 2210 Circle Dr., Lexington 4-9620, 4-2431 
Stone, Clifton, 2930 Oak Hill Rd., Evansville, Ind., GR 6-0973, 

HA 5-8251 
Strimer, Albert C, 2610 Broad St., Parkersburg, W. Va. 
Stump, Bennett, 1401 18th Street, Parkersburg, W. Va. 
Thomas, Bill, 3418 Burrell Dr., Louisville, EM 8-D643 
Trunzo, Nicholas P., 1015 Elaine Dr., Louisville 19, WO 9775, 

GL 47551, Ext. 155 
Vance, Wendell, 1307 Whirlaway, Lyndon, TW 56618, CH 54121 
VanHoose, Marvin L., Paintsville, 859-R, 174 
Vinciguerra, Philip, Matewan, W. Va. 
Watson, Ronald L., Route 2, Knightridge Rd., Bloomington, 

Ind., 20774, 20774 
Weber, David, 3707 St. Germaine, Louisville, TW 6-4298 
Weber, Edward H., 3707 St. Germaine, Louisville, Tw 6-4298, 

GL 2-2641 
White, James, P. O. Box 881, Lynch, VI 8-5608, Cumberland 

School 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Abell, James A., Burna, 34 W 

Adams, Roy D., 302 Brunswick Rd., Louisville 7, TW 66367 

Allen, Jack R., Bardstown, FI 8-8294, FI 8-3282 

Allison, Don, 330y2 N. 3rd, Central City, 667-W 

Austin, Ray, Williamsburg, 6906, 3271 

Austin, W. G., 1928 Cherry St., Paducah, 3-7071 

Babbs, Don, Henshaw, Sturgis 2520 

Baker, James M., Hazard, 770, 770 

Bales, Don B., Munfordville, JA 44811, JA 44661 

Ballard, Jack H., 128 Pine St., Barbourville, 453, 472 

Bankemper, Jerome, 43 18th St., Newport, CO 1-1064, CO 1-5620, 

Line 362 
Barry, Gerald B., 1013 Kent St., Portsmouth, Ohio, Elmwood 

3-1111, Ext. 276 (Bus. No.) 
Batten, Wade H., 3409 Sheridan Ed., Evansville, Ind., HA 

33282, HA 36117 
Beard, Ralph M., 3143 Redbud Lane, Louisville, GL 22208, 

GL 22208 
Begley, James P., Box 11, Leatherwood, Hazard 1841 (Bus, No.) 
Bennett, Gene, Wheelersburg, Ohio, Scioto 970L, Boston 522 
Bonner, William, Vanceburg, SW 6-3201, SW 6-3161 
Brewer, Randell, 117 West 6th, London, VO 4-5608, VO 4-2107 



Briscoe, Hubert, Shelbyville, 1484, 263 

Broderick, Carroll, P. O. Box 346, Bowling Green 2-5636, 3-8212 

Brown, Billy G., Crooks St., Ashland, 53406, 4S545 

Brown, Byrant, 631 Daviess St., Owensboro, MU 3-12S8, 

MU 3-2401, Ext. 273 
Brown, Eddie, 15 Bustetter Dr., Florence, Atlantic 3-6072, 

Parkway 1-4221 
Browning, William H., Route 2, Lebanon, 6921-W 
Brummett, Joseph W., 519 O'Hara, Danville, 2921, 1900, Ext. 26 
Burnett, Gerald (Duke), 624 Stewart St., Elizabethtown, 

5-9019, Catholic High 
Burton, Dennis, Jr., Box yoo Morehead State College, MoreheaJ, 

St 4-9042 
Bush, Everett, Lothair Station, Hazard, Oak 208 
Carpenter, Leonard F., Salyersville 
Carr, Gene P., 416 20tn Street, Ashland, East 4-8566 
Carroll, Joe E., Falcon, 9-4544, Bus. No.) 
Carter, James A., Broadway, Carlisle, 332, 1 
Gates, Thomas H., Benjamin Terrace, Providence, MO 7-5625 
Chandler, Bobby G., Route 4, Morganfield, 713-XR2, 531 
Chaput, Louis E., 410 College, Elizabethtown, Ro 6-7069, 

Ro 5-6286 
Coleman, L. J. "Duke", Jr., 2564 Southview, Lexington, 7-3672, 

3-0885 
Collins, Bill, Hamilton St., Georgetown, 9161 
Conn, Hershel, Dana 

Connor, Neal, 322 Division, Bellevue, Ju 11369, Hi 17100 
Copley, Sidney M., Elkhorn City, SK 4-6981 (Bus. No.) 
Craig, John G., Rochester, 143 

Crank, Buck, Box 12, 26th St., Cattlettsburg, 54 (Bus. No.) 
Crawford, Donald R., 118 W. Brown St., Nicholasville, Bryants- 

ville 2183 (Bus. No.) 
Creekmore, Ken, Revelo, 884 (Bus. No.) 

Cubbage, Thomas H., 317 N. English, Leitchfield, 80, 67-M 
Dalton, Bay, 4707 Dohn Rd., Louisville 16, EM 6-8065 
Daniels, W. R., 145 Park, Pikeville, GE 7-6531, GE 7-9145 
Davis, Donald, 39 Harrison, Bellevue, Ju 1-9813 
Davis, Donald, P. O. Box 218, Science Hill 
Davis, William, 694 W. Lexington, Danville, 2079, 1000 
DeMoisey, Fox, 227 Highland, Ft. Thomas, Hi 1-0795 
Derrick, Charles A., 3 Adrian Ct., Newport, He 1-7255, Ju 1-2366 
Dobson, Kenneth, 416% South 10th, Mayfield, 1193 
Dorroh, Glenn U., Jr., 106 Desha Rd., Lexington, 2-5328 
Dotson, John B., Harrisburg Twp. High School, Harrisburg, 

111., CL 36973, CL 37951 
Driskell, Earl, Jr., 1000 Cecil Ave., Apt. 2, Louisville 11, 

SP 86943, ME 77621, Ext. 250 
Duff, Birchell, Garrett 

Eads, Walter, Route 1, Box 6, Monticello, Fi 8-3849, Fi 8-3456 
Edmiston, Raymond L., 517 W. Arch, Madisonville, Ta 1-5567 
Edwards, Lloyd, Prestonsburg, 2908 

Elder, Donald G., Box 447, Morehead State College, Morehead 
Ellington, James E., Box 841, Hazard, Grand 894 
Elovitz, Carl, 1920 Spring Grove, Lexington, 73994, 720 Ver- 
sailles 
Et-tes, Darvin K., 117 S. Hamilton St., Georgetown, 1100 
Evans, James, Auxier, PresLonsbuig 2072 
Fagues, Homer, Combs, Oak 907, Main 368 
Ferguson, Ford, Western High School, Latham, Ohio 
Ferrell, William E., 216 Jacksboro, Somerset, 6701, 1440 
Flagg, Robert A., 3212 Ainslie Way, Louisville 5, Gl 8-6896, 

TW 5-3452 
Fleenor, Francis, 223 Sharon Dr., Bowling Green, Vi 2-2185, 

Vi 3-6472 
Foster, William R., (Bob), Science Hill, 234, 19 
Franklin, Robert, 117 First St., Marion 

Fritz, Sherman, 122 Meadowlark Dr., Richmond, 2919-J, 1695 
Gardner, Howard E., 307 Poplar Dr., Elizabethtown 
Goetz, Larry C, 120 Front St., New Richmond, Ohio, Ri 2-2959 

(Bus. No.) 
Grachler, Al, 1227 Hess Lane, Louisville 17, Me 6-1601, Me 7-4731 
Graham, James E., 2601 Elm, Ashland, 4-8169 
Gray, Raymond, Island, HU 6-2161, HU 6-2151 
Greenslait, James W., 600 Brown St., Raceland 
Grisham, Jesse R., 1527 Roosevelt St., Henderson, VA 7-1035 
Grooms, Randall, B 103 Shawneetown, Lexington 
Grone, Fred F., 1125 Winchester, Ashland, EA 4-4129 (Bus. No.) 
Hackel, John Carl, Jr., 846 Linwood Ave., Louisville, ME 4-8730 
Hale, Don C, Box 127, Berea, 1053 
Hale, John, 472 Poplar St., Harlan, 427, 246 
Hall, Billy Joe, 214i/i. Hargis, Box 456, Morehead 
Hampton, Darrell C, c/o Butler Co. High School, Morgantown, 

Logansport ex. La 6-3062 
Hampton, Wallace Ray, 305 Hickory Grove, Clarksville, Tenn., 

MI 5-5063, Greenwood Jr. High 
Hardin, Jack H., 1105 "B" St., Ceredo, W. Va. 
Hargis, Bobby S., Box 3, Calvert City, EX 6-4849, EX 6-4188 
Harmon, Hayes R., Inez, 2771 

Harrell, Bill D., Methodist Home, Versailles, 107, 107 
Heldman, Dr. John, Jr., 140 Seneca Trail, Louisville 14, EM 

3-2181, ME 7-2631 
Haynes, John. 416 Clay, Henderson, 7-6137 
Haynes, John, 416 Clay, Henderson, 7-5137 
Hines, G. Cliff, 1113 Covington, Bowling Green, VI 3-4810 
Hiten, John W., 722 Melrose, Lexington, 4-8672, 2-2626 
Hobbs, Charles V., 627 Westview Dr., Westwood Station, 

Ashland, EA 4-9439, EA 4-2176 
Hobby, Bill, 127 Highland Ave., Princeton, 5196, 8780 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1958 



Hoffman, Jack J., Box 455. Vine Grove, TR 7-2247, 4676, 

Ft. Knox 
Hofstetter, Joe. Box 2173. Williamson, W. Va. 
Hoggard, Robert, 1349 College, Bowling Green, 21579 
Holden, Frve H.. Box 212. Centertown. BE 2-4262, La 6-3542 
Holzknecht, George L., Jr.. 2902 Miles Rd., Louisville, GL 8-5661, 

ME 7-8741 
Hon, Woodrow, 521 Tampa Dr., Owensboro, MU 4-5140, 

MU 3-7325 
Hook, William Frank. Route 2, Box 3. Kevil. Hobart 2-6941 
Hopper. Edwin, Box 183, Russell Springs, 6-7393 
Horton, John. Lyons Apts.. Monticello, Fi 8-4444, Fi 8-4444 
Howard, Jimmy D., 1106 Starke Ave., Paducah. 2-0198, 3-5629 
Hudson. J. D.. Caneyville 

Huff, David N., 212 Main St., Hazard, 1254, 609 
Hunt, Jack L., 920 Greenwood, Clarksville, Tenn, 5-5804, 5-4844 
Huter, James J., 3643 Vermont, Louisville, SP 6-0707, 2271, 

Henryville, Ind. 
Idol, Billy Joe, 115 Oakwood Rd., Middlesboro, 397 
James, William V., 911 N. Main, Beaver Dam, BR 4-4928, 

MU 3-3575, Owensboro 
Jeter. John B., 1702 Versailles Rd., Lexington. 4-9935, 3-2464 
Johnson. John Luther, Shelby Gap 
Johnston, Edward E.. 300 College, Paducah, 2-0216 
Kazee, Bill, HI Maple, Danville, 1721, 1721 
Kimmel, Jerry, Beechmont, GR 6-2656, GR 6-2276 
King. Bob, 119 So. SSth, Louisville, SP 8-4660, SP 8-2762, Ext. 36 
King, Capt. Edw.n C, Provost Marshall's Office, M.C.S.C, 

Albany, Ga. 
King, Russell, 943 Whitney, Lexington. 43049 
Kingston. Waldo. 1001 Village Dr., S. Charleston, W. Va. 
Kitchen. Leslie. 1701 Lindy Ln.. Lexington. 3-0396, 5-1575 
Landolt, Gene, 1002 Payne, Murray, 1685, 560 
Lawson, Leland, 949 DePorres, Lexington 4-1009, 2-3044 
Littral, James W.. 460 Locust. Lexington, 3-0364, 3-3335, 

Station 1 
Lyons. Harold M., Miley Ave.. Cynthiana. 1347M, 99 
McGehee, Gordon, 117 E. 30th. Covington. CO 1-6880 
McMillin. Larry L., Route 6, Cynthiana, 852-M-4 
MePeek, Stewart R., Dorton 
Mahan, Carle "Buddy", French St.. Winchester, Winchester 

1717, Lexington 2-0290 
Maines, George, 44 Clover St.. Erlanger, Di 1-7460. Di 1-7720 
Marks, Howard R.. 2425 S. York St.. Owensboro. MU 3-0543, 

RE 3-4421 
Mason. Gene. Route 5. Mayfield, Fi 5-2430 
Marushi. Rudy, 551 Stratton St.. Logan. W. Va. 
Mayes, Edward. 838 Crossbill 986 R, 1008 
Mays, Ralph. Barbourville, 710 R, 130 
Messerian. Nishan, P. O. Box 3226. Univ. of Ky.. Lexington, 

Williamson. W. Va., 1973. U. of Ky. 2-2200, Ext. 3447 
Middleton. Harry D.. 616 North St.. Richmond. 620-J 
Mikez, Joe. 414 No. 8th, Murray. 1887W 

Millard. Harry L.. 441 West 2nd Street. Lexington, 2-9212 
Miller, Bill, Campbellsville College, Campbellsville, 470-J, 365 
Miller, John D.. Claiksville. Tennessee 
Miller. Roy L., Belton, Drakesboro GR 6-2666, Drakesboro 

GR 6-2666 
Miller, William L., Belton 
Mitchell. Jimmie. 339 College, Georgetown 
Morrissey. Rockne. 549 Rosemont. Cincinnati 5, Ohio, WA 1-4418, 

WA 1-3240 
Mudd, Ed. 3512 Mildred Dr.. Louisville, SP 6-6888 
Mueller, Frank J.. 3023-4 Rodney. Ft. Riley. Kans. 
Newnam. Luther G., Beattyville, IN 4-2560. IN 4-8132 
Nie. Allen F., 1031 Isabella. Newport, AX 1-6847 
Noel, Paul. Midway. TH 6-4101 
Nord. Ed. 1723 So 23rd St., Louisville, SP 4-1958, TW 5-3401, 

Ext. 202 
Norvell. Glover H.. Jr.. 464 Carlisle. Lexington. 1-3075, 2-2626 
O'Bryan. Robert. 223 Granvil Dr.. Louisville, GL 8-7675, 

JU 7-9111, Ext. lA 
Odle, Thurman. 1246 Center St.. Bowling Green 
Page. Jimmie. 1723 Clay St.. Paducah 
Pate. Roy E.. Campbellsville 

Patrick, Ronald L., 195V> N. Lancaster. Athens. Ohio 
Penner. Merritt D.. Jr.. R. F. D. 2. Box No. 628, Manchester 
Perkins. William. 108 E. Thomas, Lexington 
Petett. Frank M., 418 E. 13th. Bowling Green. VI 2-0345 
Petty. John F.. Route 1. Gracey, AD 6-6063 
Powell, Larry Earl, Route 1. West Paducah, 2-8891. 2-8891 
Price. James E.. Star Route. Liberty. 2581 
Price. Jimmy H.. Wheatcroft. School (Bus. No.) 
Quillen. John. E. Main. Hazard, 406. 356 
Radjunas. Stan. 1644 Elliott, Ashland. East 4-1896 
Reed. Clifford. Box 36. Hodgenville, EL 8-3564, RO 5-6114 
Reinhardt, Myron S., 1443 N. Ft. Thomas Ave.. Ft. Thomas, 

HI 1-3730. MY 7-8081 
Reynolds. W. J.. Jr.. Martin, 3020 

Rison. Johnny B., 197 3rd St.. Ravenna. 275-R. 106 
Ritter, Goebel, 104 Wooton St., Hazard, 835, 356 
Roberts, Bob, 424 Culpepper Rd.. Lexington, 42594, 5-2020 
Roberts, Earl C. Science Hill 19. 19 

Robertson. Williom R.. 121 Main St.. Springfield. 4164, 9956 
Robinson. Pearl. Manchester. LY 8-4311 (Bus. No.) 
Roby, Joseph L.. General Delivery, Morgantown, LA 6-9341, 

LA 6-3062 
Rose, Donald, Campton 
Rush, Ralph, Box 68 London 



Russell, Allen, 1503 Sycamore, Murray, 821-W 

St. Clair. Robert L., Jr., 435 N. 29th St., Louisville, SP 4-2911, 

EM 3-0623, Ext. 12 
Sanders. Mel, 3910 Sunset Ave., Paducah, 2-3660, 6-6311, Ext. 685 
Schlich, Paul, 3150 Talisman Rd., Louisville, GI 8-6765, 

TW 6-0211 
Schwitz, Joe, 1419 Sweetser, Evansville, Ind., GR 7-2933, 

HA 4-2954 
Scott. Emmanuel H.. 706 W. 8th St., Cincinnati, Ohio, DU 1-6468 
Scott, Luther, 211 Spruce, Murray, 1665 
Shackelford, Roscoe, E. Main St.. Hazard. Oak 761 
Shaw, Earl, 109 Hill Court, Lancaster, 624, 2208 
Shively, Howard, Jr., Radcliff. EL 1-3732, EL 1-3226 
Shuck, Thomas G., 960 Stonewall, Lexington, 7-1472, 7-1472 
Siler, Clarence M., 8th St. & Cumberland Ave., Williamsburg, 

6188 
Simons, Joe Allen, R. R. 2, Flemingsburg, 4681 
Simms, Sylvester, 510 N. Donivan St., Princeton, 6678 
Slack. Earl H., 4630 Hillside Dr., Louisville, EM 6-8793 
Small, William W., "Bill", 1846 Mary Catherine Dr., Louisville 

16, EM 8-8365, HI 4900 
Smith, Wayne N.. Cane Valley 

Smith, Wilbur W., Horse Cave, ST 6-6131, PR 3-7951 
Smith, Willard N.. Cane Valley, Fulton 4-5943 
Solomon, Jim, 1629V. Farmer Ave., Murray 

Spencer, Irvine E.. 1811 Dubourg Ave., Louisville 16, SP 8-6281 
Spiceland. S. E., 306 South 13th. Murray, 852 
Stamper, Paul, West Liberty, SH 3-3612, SH 3-4575 
Stephenson, Harry, 2210 Circle Dr., Lexington, 4-9620, 4-2431 
Stikeleather, Clyde L., 201 Goff Dr.. Leitchfield, 892-R, 104 
Strange, William L., McCullum Ave., Elizabethtown, RO 5-4003, 

RO 5-6286 
Strickland, Lloyd, 3303 Powell, Louisville, EM 6-2005, GL 4-7511, 

Ext. 705 
Strong. David A., Box 33. Howard Air Force Base, Canal Zone 
Taylor, Jerry F., Williamsburg 

Temple. Donald R.. 523 12th St., Bowling Green, VI 3-6923 
Thacker, Cledith, Conway 

Thurman, A. Earl, 3025 Allen, Owensboro, MU 3-9583, RO 4-5151 
Tichenor, Jimmy, Centertown, BE 2-4334 
Tipton, Asa I.. 828 Hillwood. Frankfort, 3-8714, 3-1641 
Tolle, Lewis D., 226 N. Church. Cynthiana. 1436, 235 
Tucker, Neal, Dunmor. SK 6-8566, GR 6-2204 
Urlage, Richard, 822 Highland Ave.. Ft. Thomas, HI 1-5513 
Vance. Earl G.. 304 Norris Ct., Glasgow, 3083, 5205 
Van Zant, Jim. 502 Ben St., Williamson, W. Va. 
Waldon. Tot. Bandana. CA 4-2336 
Walls. Harry Buford, 1310 Walter Ave., Louisville, EM 6-3454, 

ME 7-3611 
Ward, Jackie D.. 1701 E. 22nd St.. Owensboro, MU 3-4147 
Watkins. Paul Douglas, 417 W. 7th St., Owensboro, MU 3-3575 

(Bus. No.) 
Weaver. B. H., Robin Road. Horse Cave. ST 6-6781. ST 6-6181 
White. David B.. 1S77 Center St., Bowling Green, VI 2-5752, 

VI 3-4331 
Wilcox. Ursal R.. Auxier, 4411 (Bus. No.) 
Wilham, Earl, Harrodsburg. 1788 
Willett, Arthur "Pud". 3808 Nanz, Louisville, TW 5-0715, 

JU 4-9711, Ext. 136 
Williams. Tom M.. Jr., 116 E. Broadway. Bardstown 
Winchester, Roy L.. Vaughn Mill Rd., Box 164, Route 10, 

Louisville, CE 9-5202, CE 9-3267 
Woods, Fairce O., Box 247, Jackson, NO 6-5384, NO 6-2805 
Wright, Billy Joe, Salt Lick, OR 4-3927 
Zody, William Thurman, 166i/> N. Ashland, Lexington, 3-1276 



New Basketball Film 

A new basketball film, BASKETBALL 
FOR MILLIONS, vs^as made by Official 
Sports Film Service in Shelbyville, Tennessee, 
during the week of March 31 - April 5, 1958. 
The film was produced under the sanction 
of the National Federation of State High 
School Athletic Associations in cooperation 
with the National Basketball Committee of 
the United States and Canada, the National 
Association of Basketball Coaches, and allied 
groups. The premier showing was held at 
the 39th Annual Meeting of the Federation. 
The film is sponsored by two good friends 
of athletics, General Mills, Inc., and Wilson 
Sporting Goods Company. 

(Continued on Page Twelve) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1958 



Page Five 



Member Schools oftheKH.S.A.A. 



The following schools are me 
School Athletic Association for tli 

Principals of member schools should check this list 
see if the names of schools with which they ha 
games are included. This list was compiled and 
printer on October 1. A supplementary list 
schools joining in October will appear in the No 
of the magazine. 



of the Kentucky High 

ending .June 30, 1959. 

carefully to 

e scheduled 

sent to the 



nber 



Adair County 

(Columbia) 
Adairville 
Ahrens Trade 

(Louisville) 
Allen County 

(Scotts'ville) 
Almo 
Alvaton 
Anderson 

(Lawrenceburg) 
Annville Institute 
Ashland 
Atherton High 

(Louisville) 
Attucks 

( Hopkins ville) 
Auburn 
Augusta 
Austin Tracy 

(Lucas) 
Auxier 
Bag-dad 
Ballard Memorial 

(Barlow) 
Barbourville 
Bardstown 
Bardstown Training 
Bate 

(Danville) 
Beaver Dam 
Beechwood 

(So. Ft. Mitchell) 
Belfry 
Bell County 

(Pineville) 
Bellevue 
Benham 
Benton 
Berea 

Betsy Layne 
Black Star 

(Alva) 
Blaine 
Bloomfield 
Boone County 

(Florence) 
Bourbon County 

(Paris) 
Bowling Green 
Boyd County 

(Ashland) 
Bracken County 

(Brooks ville) 
Breathitt 

(Jackson) 
Breckinridge County 

(Hardinsburg) 
Breckinridge Training 

(Morehead) 
Bremen 
Bristow 



(Bowling Green) 
Brownsville 
Buckeye 

(Lancaster) 
Buckhom 
Bunche 

(Glasgow) 
Burgin 
Burnside 
Bush 

(Lida) 
Butler 
Butler 

(Sbively) 
Butler County 

(Morgantown) 
Caldwell County 

(Princeton) 
Calhoun 
Campbell County 

(Alexandria) 
Campbellsburg 
Campbellsville 
Camp Dick Robinson 

(Lancaster) 
Caneyville 
Carlisle 
Carlisle County 

(Bardwell) 
Carr Creek 
Carrollton 
Carter 
Catlettsburg 
Caverna 

(Cave City) 
Central 

(Clinton) 
Central 

(Louisville) 
Central City 
Centertown 
Chandler's Chapel 

(Auburn) 
Clark County 

(Winchester) 
Clarkson 
Clay 
Clifty 
Clinton County 

(Albany) 
Corbin 
Cordia 

(Hazard) 
Covington Catholic 
Crab Orchard 
Crofton 
Cuba 

(Mayfield) 
Cub Run 
Cumberland 
Cumberland County 

(Burkes'ville) 



Cynthiana 
Dalton 
Danville 
Daviess County 

(Owensboro) 
Dawson Springs 
Dayton 
Deming 

(Mt. Olivet) 
DeSales 

(Louisville) 
Dixie Heights 

(So. Ft. Mitchell) 
Dixon 
Dorton 
Dotson 

(Princeton) 
Douglass 

(Lexington) 
Douglass 

(Murray) 
Drakesboro 

Drakesboro Community 
DuBois 

(Mt. Sterling) 
Dunbar 

(Mayfield) 
Dunbar 

(Morganfield) 
Dunham 

(Jenkins) 
duPont Manual 

(Louisville) 
Durham 

(Campbellsville) 
Durrett 

(Louisville) 
Earlington 
Eastern 

(Middletown) 
East Main Street 

(Lynch) 
ElizabethtoviTi 
Elizabethtown Catholic 
Elkhorn City 
Eminence 
Estill County 

(Irvine) 
Evarts 
Fairview 

(Ashland) 
Falmouth 
Farmington 
Ferguson 
Fern Creek 
Flaget 

(Louisville) 
Flaherty 

(Vine Grove) 
Flat Gap 
Fleming County 

(Flemingsburg) 
Fleming-Neon 

(Fleming) 
Fordsville 
Forkland 

(Gravel Switch) 
Fort Knox 



Foundation 

(Berea College) 
Frankfort 
Franklin County 

(Frankfort) 
Franklin-Simpson 

(Franklin) 
Frederick Fraize 

(Cloverport) 
Fredericktown 

(Springfield) 
Fredonia 
Fulgham 

(Clinton) 
Fulton 
Fulton County 

(Hickman) 
Gallatin County 

(Warsaw) 
Gamaliel 
Georgetown 
Glasgow 
Glendale 
Good Shepherd 

(Frankfort) 
Graham 
Grant County 

(Dry Ridge) 
Greensburg 
Greenville 
Greenup 
Hall 

(Grays Knob) 
Hanson 
Harlan 
Harrison County 

(Cynthiana) 
Harrodsburg 
Hartford 
Hawesville 
Hazard 
Hazel 

Hazel Green Academy 
Hazel Green 

(East Bernstadt) 
Heath 

(West Paducah) 
Hellier 
Henderson 
Henderson County 

(Henderson) 
Henderson Settlement 

(Frakes) 
Henry Central 

(New Castle) 
Henry Clay 

(Lexington) 
Highlands 

(Ft. Thomas) 
High Street 

(Bowling Green) 
Hindman 
Hiseville 
Kitchens 
Holmes 

(Covington) 
Holy Cross 

(Covington) 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1958 



Holy Family 

(Ashland) 
Holy Name 

(Hendeison) 
Hopkinsville 
Horse Branch 
Howevalley 

(Cecilia) 
Hughes Kirk 

(Beechmont) 
Hustonville 
Inez 
Irvine 
Irvington 
Jackson 
Jenkins 
Jessamine County 

(Nicholasville) 
Johns Creek 

(Pikeville) 
Junction City 
Kentucky Mil. Institute 

(Lyndon) 
Ky. School for Blind 

(Louisville) 
Kingdom Come 

(Linefork) 
Kirksey 
Knott County 

(Pippa Passes) 
Knox Central 

(Barbourville) 
Kyrock 

( Sweeden) 
Lacy 

(Hopkinsville) 
Lafayette 

(Lexington) 
Lancaster 
LaRue County 

(Hodgenville) 
Leatherwood 

(Slemp) 
Lebanon Junction 
Lee County 

(Beattyville) 
Leitchfield 
Leslie County 

(Hyden) 
Letcher 
Lewisburg 
Lewisport 
Lexington Catholic 
Liberty 
Lily 
Lincoln 

(Franklin) 
Lincoln 

(Middlesboro) 
Lincoln 

(Paducah) 
Lincoln Institute 

(Lincoln Ridge) 
Livennore 
Livingston 
Lloyd Memorial 

(Erlanger) 
London 
Lone Jack 

(Four Mile) 
Louisville Country Day 
Louisville Male 



Lowes 
Loyall 
Ludlow 
Lynn Camp 
Lynn Grove 
Lynnvale 

(White Mills) 
Lyon County 

(Kuttawa) 
McCreary County 

(iWh'itley City) 
McDowell 
McKee 
McKell 

(South Shore) 
McKinney 

(Richmond) 
Mackville 
Madison Central 
Madison-Model 

(Richmond) 
Magoffin Baptist Inst. 

(Mountain Valley) 
Marrowbone 
Martin 
Mayfield 
May's Lick 
Maysville 
Maytown 

(Lang-ley) 
Meade County 

(Brandenburg) 
Meade Memorial 

(Williamsport) 
Memorial 

(Hardyville) 
Memorial 

(Waynesburg) 
Menifee County 

(Frenchburg) 
Mercer County 

(Harrodsburg) 
Metcalfe County 

(Edmonton) 
Middleburg 
Middlesboro 
Midway 

Millersburg Mili. Inst. 
J. W. Million 

(Earlington) 
Minerva 
Montgomery 

(Mt. Sterling) 
Monticello 
Morgan 

(Falmouth) 
Morgan County 

(West Liberty) 
Morganfield 
Mt. Sterling 
Mt. Vernon 
Mt. Washington 
Muhlenberg Central 

(Powderly) 
Mullins 

(Pikeville) 
Munfordville 
Murray 

Murray Training 
Nancy 
Napier 

(Darfork) 



Nebo 

New Concord 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

North Marshall 

(Calvert City) 
North Middletown 
North Wai-ren 

(Smiths Grove) 
Oil Springs 
Oldham County 

(LaGrange) 
Old Ky. Home 

(Bardstown) 
Olive Hill 
Olmstead 
Owen County 

(Owenton) 
Owensboro 
Owensboro Catholic 
Owingsville 
Owsley 

(Booneville) 
Paducah Tilghman 
Paint Lick 
Paintsville 
Paris 
Park City 
Parksville 
P. L. Dunbar 

(Lexington) 
Pembroke 
Perryville 
Phelps 
Pikeville 
Pine Knot 
Pineville 
Pleasureville 
Poplar Creek 

(Carpenter) 
Powell County 

(Stanton) 
Prestonsburg 
Prichard 

(Grayson) 
Providence 
Pulaski County 

(Somerset) 
Raceland 
Red Bird 

(Beverly) 
Reidland 

(Paducah) 
Richardsville 
Rineyville 
Riverview 

(Hickman) 
Rockholds 
Rosenwald 

(Barbourville) 
Rosenwald 

(Harlan) 
Rosenwald 

(Lebanon) 
Rosenwald 

(Madisonville) 
Rowan County 

(Morehead) 
Russell 
Russellville 
Sacramento 
St. Agatha Academy 



(Winchester) 
St. Agnes 

(Uniontown) 
St. Augustine 

(Lebanon) 
St. Benedict 

(Lebanon Junction) 
St. Camillus Academy 

(Corbin) 
St. Catherine 

(New Haven) 
St. Francis 

(Loretto) 
St. Henry 

(Erlanger) 
St. John 

(Paducah) 
St. Joseph 

(Bowling Green) 
St. Joseph Prep. 

(Bardstown) 
St. Mary 

(Alexandria) 
St. Mary's Academy 

(Paducah) 
St. Patrick's 

(Maysville) 
St. Thomas 

(Ft. Thomas) 
St. Vincent Academy 
St. Xavier 

(Louisville) 
Salyersville 
Sandy Hook 
Scott County 

(Georgetown) 
Scottsville 
Sebree 
Sedalia 
Seneca 

(Louisville) 
Sharpsburg 
Shawnee 

(Louisville) 
Shelbyville 
Shopville 
Silver Grove 
Simmons 

(Versailles) 
Simon Kenton 

(Independence) 
Simpsonville 
Sinking Fork 

(Hopkinsville) 
Slaughters 
Somerset 
Sonora 
South Christian 

(Herndon) 
Southern 

(Louisville) 
South Hopkins 

(Nortonville) 
South Marshall 

(Benton) 
South Portsmouth 
Springfield 
Stanford 
Stinnett Settlement 

(Hoskinston) 
Sturgis 
Sunfish 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1958 



Page Seven 



Symsonia 
Taylor County 

(Campbellsville) 
Taylorsville 
Temple Hill 

(Glasgow) 
Tompkinsville 
Todd County 

(Elkton) 
Tollesboro 
Trigg County 

(Cadiz) 
Trimble County 

(Bedford) 
Trinity 

(Louisville) 
Tyner 
University 

(Lexington) 
Utica 
Valley 

(Valley Station) 
Vanceburg-Lewis County 

(Vanceburg) 
Van Lear 
Versailles 
Vine Grove 



Virgie 
Waddy 
Waggener 
Wallins 
Walton- Verona 

(Walton) 
Warfield 
Warren County 

(Bowling- Green) 
Wayne County 

(Monticello) 
Western 

(Owensboro) 
Western 

(Paris) 
Western 

(Sinai) 
West Main Street 

(Lynch) 
Wheelwright 
Whitesburg 
Williamsburg 
Williamstown 
Willisburg 
Winchester 
Wingo 
Wurtland 



NATIONAL FEDERATION MEETING 

(Continued from September Issue) 

The State Executive Officers' Session was called 
to order by presiding officers Secretary W. W. Rus- 
sell (California), Secretary Henry De Young (Wash- 
ington) and Secretary E. P. Grider (Idaho.) A 
report of "Increased Operational Cost of State 
Associations" was presented by Commissioner Glenn 
T. Wilson (Colorado). His comments were based 
upon the results of a questionnaire returned by 
each State Association. Charlie Smith (N. A. 
I. A.) greeted the Executive Officers on behalf of 
the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics 
and its Executive Secretary Al Duer, who, because 
of temporary illness, was unable to attend the an- 
nual meeting. Mr. Smith reported members of his 
association are pleased with the affiliation and the 
mutual benefits and advantages which have resulted 
from the Alliance. The "Year's Successes and 
Question Marks" were reviewed by Secretary Wil- 
liam Pace (Virginia). "Gearing the Athletic Pro- 
gram to Current Needs" was discussed by Director 
C. E. Forsythe (Michigan). Several informative 
progress reports were made during this session. 
Secretary John Roberts (Wisconsin) reviewed his 
State Association's building program. Secretary 
Foster Bridges (Tennessee) briefly summarized re- 
cent developments and changes in State Association 
retirement plans. A comprehensive progress report 
concerning "The Status of School Insurance" was 
made by L. W. Grimes (Secretary, New York Pro- 
tection Plan.) Director W. M. Runyon (0. S. F. S.) 
reported the football film strip project had been 
completed. 

The Board of Control session was called to 
order by Vice-President Winston Nelson (California) 
with Federation President Homer Williams (Idaho) 
and President Julius Wendt (Washington) serving 
as co-presiding officers. President Frank Kendall 
(Alabama) outlined some of the public relations 
values of rules meetings as sponsored by the State 
High School Association. President David Bates 
(Oregon) made an interesting and instructive pre- 



sentation concerning the cost of operating a State 
High School Association. President Andrew J. Smith 
(New York) presented the topic 'Whose Side are 
You On?" This presentation was a highlight of the 
session. It raised questions concerning where the 
loyalties of those connected with the school athletic 
program should lie. Board Member Leon Brig-ham 
(Washington) presented viewpoints about Associa- 
tion policies concerning meetings. He called atten- 
tion to practices followed by his own State Associa- 
tion and to those followed by other State Associa- 
tions with which he is familiar. Board Member 
John C. Wells (Minnesota) presented the timely 
topic "Changed Times Demand New Viewpoints." 
Progress reports were given on Tournament De- 
velopments, Association Building Programs, and Re- 
tirement Plans by President HaiTy Fitzhugh (Ill- 
inois), President C. E. Wetmore (Wisconsin), and 
President C. 0. Jett (Tennessee) respectively. 

The general session on Monday afternoon was 
devoted to topics of common interest. Reed K. 
Swenson (President, N. J. C. A. A.) spoke on "The 
National Alliance Moves Forward," and Assistant 
Secretary M. F. Sprunger (Illinois) discussed "Who 
Determines the Policies for What?" Milton Raymer 
(Secretary, American Junior Bowling Congress) 
presented an outline of the bowling program as 
conducted by his organization. Attorney Howard A. 
Johnson (Montana) had prepared an address en- 
titled "Digest of Precedent-Setting Court Cases." 
Mr. Johnson could not deliver the address in person, 
and National Federation Secretary H. V. Porter 
served as a pinch-hitter in delivering parts of the 
address. 

The Monday Night Session was a dinner meet- 
ing. A program with great variety was presented. 
Because California President Willard B. Knowles 
was called home for an important meeting, Secre- 
tary W. W. Russell (California) served as master 
of ceremonies in his customary efficient and inter- 
esting manner. Following the introduction of guests 
and "Citations and Last Mile for Initiates," there 
was a preview of the showing of the film "Basket- 
ball for Millions." Director W. M. Runyon (Official 
Sports Film Service) named and commended the 
advisory staff who assisted with the making of the 
picture. The fine reception given the film was a 
tribute to the careful work of the Director and all 
of those who served on the technical staff. 

One of the Tuesday morning sessions was de- 
voted to presentations of Non-Athletic topics. The 
other session was a Track and Field Symposium; 
conducted by Secretary W. W. Russell (California). 
Tuesday afternoon was devoted to recreation. Var- 
ious types of activity had been aiTanged for the 
entertainment of all guests. Vice-President W. R. 
Fugitt (West Virginia) presided over the Tuesday 
evening session. Commissioner L. V. Phillips (In- 
diana) discussed "Wins and Losses on the Promo- 
tional Front," and Director Arthur Corey gave the 
principal address of the session. His subject was 
"Progress through United Action." 

The Wednesday morning and afternoon sessions 
were devoted to rules discussion and technical mat- 
ters concerned with football, swimming, wrestling, 
basketball, baseball, and track. Numerous and valu- 
able presentations were made bv the following: 
S. F. Burke (Georgia), V. E. McColey (Kansas), 
J. C. Harper (Alabama), Norman Duncan (U. C. 
L. A.), Carl Copelk (Kansas), Webb Porter (Tenn- 
essee), U. G. Montgomery (New Mexico), Oden 
(Continued on Page Twelve) 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1958 



The Flying Dutchman 

Dave Longenecker, widely known football 
official, has put his finger on a most import- 
ant issue relative to the officials' employ- 
ment bureaus set up in the various regions 
of the Commonwealth by the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association. The officials' 
employment bureaus are designed as a serv- 
ice both to the high schools needing officials 
and to our arbiters desiring to officiate in 
Kentucky's sports program. 

Dave points out that in order to make this 
service accomplish all that it is intended to 
it is necessary that football and basketball 
officials cooperate religiously by immediately 
filing their schedules of games with the 
bureaus. Recently one official bureau had 
calls for fourteen officials and was unable 
to serve the schools and yet there were 
thirty officials in that area who were with- 
out games and remained gameless because 
they had not filed their working schedules 
with the bureau. 

Some regions have plenty of officials and 
these render themselves service by listing 
their games promptly ; there are others es- 
pecially in the mountains where football of- 
ficials seem to resemble "Our vanishing 
men." It is even necessary in some of these 
places for schools to schedule games on 
nights when officials are available. In such 
instances officials render service by listing 
their game schedules so that these schools 
may be advised of the men available and the 
dates possible for them to work. Dave has 
sounded a key note. The Dutchman now calls 
on Kentucky's officials to help make our em- 
ployment bureaus the essence of efficiency 
by filing their schedules and by keeping the 
bureaus up to date as more contests are 
added. 

Right now the Flying Dutchman is putting 
his other shirt in a bag getting ready for his 
annual "Sashay" over Kentucky. Before 
heading for Western Kentucky he will jour- 
ney to Indianapolis, Indiana, to conduct the 
state-wide Indiana Clinic for Colonel L. V. 
Phillips and Colonel Bob Hinshaw, Commis- 
sioner and Assistant Commissioner of the 
Indiana High School Athletic Association. 
Following that meeting there will be 1900 
miles of fine autumn driving ahead of the 
Dutchman as he heads for the Eastern Ken- 
tucky discussing this year's basketball rules 
with Kentucky's coaches and officials. 

One face will be missing for the first time 
since the clinics were started, that of Leland 
Rubarts. The popular postmaster of Dunn- 



ville is grieving because he is forced to at- 
tend a postmasters convention in Miami, 
Florida, when he would like to be at the 
basketball rules clinic in Somerset. Surely 
there cannot be many Kentuckians who have 
as great a love of the clinics as Leland has. 
The postmaster, who is one of Kentucky's 
better officials, does hold some kind of an 
attendance record and the Dutchman salutes 
him for his years of faithfulness. 

We have always maintained that the Ken- 
tucky basketball and football clinics make for 
strong friendly relationships between coaches 
and officials. "Proof of the Pudding" is in 
evidence when coaches and officials join to- 
gether as business partners. Twenty years 
ago if anybody told us that a college coach 
and a sports official would be teamed up in 
business we would have suggested a cranial 
examination. Today, however, nationally 
hailed Coach Peck Hickman of the Univer- 
sity of Louisville and "Ole Ben Edelen" have 
opened a sporting goods store in Buechel 
near the city limits of Louisville. 

Cliff Fagan, Executive Secretary of the 
National Federation of State High School 
Athletic Associations, is putting on a basket- 
ball rules interpreters meeting in Chicago 
on October 13. His program follows: 10:00 
A. M., Introductions; 10:05 A. M., Rule Fun- 
damentals and Changes, Clifford B. Fagan, 
National Federation; 11:30 A. M., Ways of 
Determining Responsibility, Lyle Quinn, 
Iowa; 11:45 A. M., Basketball for Millions, 
W. M. Runyon, Official Sports Film Service ; 
1 :30 P. M., Late Discovery of Infractions, 
M. F. Sprunger, Illinois; 1:45 P. M., Running 
with the Ball, Charlie Vettiner, Kentucky; 
2 :00 P. M., Held Ball Situation, Webb Porter, 
Tennessee; 2:15 P. M., Insufficient Action 
Rule and Review, Clifford B. Fagan, National 
Federation. 

Max Macon, Manager of the St. Paul Saints 
of the American Association, gets the Dutch- 
man's nod of recognition for outstanding 
work turned in as a college basketball official 
over the past years. Macon calls the big 
things. He would rather miss a player tickl- 
ing another and pick up a really big one 
underneath the basket. 

As Max looked over the 1958-59 rules 
clinic program he commented, "Hope there's 
nothing complicated this year. Complicated 
calls keep the officials in hot water." For- 
tunately the calls this year are of the un- 
complicated variety. 

This year a rules change says that a player 
is under close guard when his opponent is 
6 feet away. Many have asked where the 6 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1958 



Page Nine 



feet is measured from. It is from toe to toe 
and the official should not be liberal in his 
estimation of 6 feet. To uncomplicate the 
official's procedure when a foul is called, he 
should remember to (1) Hold his fist above 
his head (2) Get the number of the violator 
and signal the scorer (3) Signal what his 
call was. 

No recommendations have come to the 
Dutchman yet for honoring communities 
with the Abou Ben Adhem Award for good 
neighborly practices, nor to recognize a 
physically handicapped athlete for overcom- 
ing his handicap to participate in sports. A 
recommendation is on our desk now from 
Bennie Edelen calling for a Corn Cob Pipe of 
Honor to be sent to Tom Easterling, sports 
writer of the Courier Journal. According to 
Ben's recommendation, Tom, who is widely 
known for his coverage of Indiana sports for 
the Louisville Paper, has gone far beyond 
the call of duty to promote school boy sports 
and to give encouragement to youngsters 
playing them. Because of his countless un- 
selfish hours spent for the good of others 
the thoroughbred with the Corn Cob Pipe of 
Honor adorning his neck is on its way to 
"Big Tawm." 

Bring your news items for the Flying 
Dutchman to the clinic session! 



EARLY SEASON FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 
a dead ball foul with a penalty of 15 yards 
from the spot where the ball became dead. 
The succeeding down will be 1st down-10. 

30. Play : Prior to the snap, Al "under the 
snapper" moves diagonally backward. He 
stops. Half-back A2' from behind the line 
then starts backward and continues in mo- 
tion until ball is snapped. 

Ruling: Legal. 

31. Play: At the snap, end Al has a po- 
sition beyond the line of scrimmage (in 
the neutral zone or beyond). Al then goes 
downfield during a forward pass which 
crosses line of scrimmage. 

Ruling: Multiple foul. Al was offside and 
since he was not an eligible receiver he also 
committeed forward pass interference when 
he went downfield beyond the line of scrim- 
mage during a forward pass which crossed 
the line. 

32. Play : After the clock has been stopped 
because of a penalty and while the Referee 
is presenting the options to Captain Bl, sub- 
stitute B12 enters the field and instructs 
Bl to decline the penalty. 

Ruling: This procedure violates no rule. 



This, of course, is assuming B12 is a legal 
substitute who has become a player. Ex- 
perienced Officials would generally encour- 
age Bl to make his decision without assist- 
ance and Officials in this situation would, as 
subtly as possible, discourage B12 from con- 
versing with his Captain. 

33. Play: During dead ball immediately 
following a play, the Umpire observes that 
B2 appears injured. Team B has had three 
charged time-outs. Umpire stops clock and 
directs B2 to leave game because of injury. 
B2 and his Captain insist that B2 remain in 
game. 

Ruling: B2 must leave game and team B 
is charged with a time-out. 

34. Play: Defensive lineman Bl vigorous- 
ly swings arm in countering an opponent's 
shoulder charge so that his: (a) forearm; 
or (b) locked hands strike the opponent 
across his chest. 

Ruling: Personal foul in both (a) and (b) 
and disqualify Bl. A defensive player may 
use hands or arms to push or pull an oppon- 
ent but he may not strike him in any man- 
ner. 

85. Play: As ball is snapped, defensive 
guard B4 backs off and out of line so that 
he is a yard or more off the line of scrim- 
mage. Forward pass crosses line. A4 charges 
through neutral zone and blocks B4. Forward 
pass: (a) hits; or (b) does not hit A4. 

Ruling: Forward pass interference. In- 
eligible A may be legally beyond the neutral 
zone before the pass is touched only when 
he drives an opponent back from (through) 
the neutral zone. In the play above, A4 did 
not contact his opponent until after charging 
through the neutral zone. 

36. Play: Time-out is granted to team A. 
After about 20 or 30 seconds, they are ready- 
for-play. Is it necessary for B to play when 
A is ready or are they entitled to the full 2 
minutes? Also, if B requests a charged 
time-out, should it be granted? 

Ruling: When A is ready. Official should 
declare the ball ready-for-play after there 
has been reasonable time for iDoth teams to 
take positions. If, in this situation, B should 
have a player talking with his coach at a 
sideline, reasonable time should be allowed 
for B to get back to position but it is not 
intended that B should be allowed to con- 
tinue his conference through the remainder 
of the 2 minutes. A request by any player 
for a consecutive charged time-out should be 
refused. 

37. Play: Tackle Al and End A2 take a 



Paare Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1958 



three-point stance on the hne of scrimmage. 
A2 then shifts to a new position in the back- 
field, leaving Al on the end of the line. Al 
then moves to a new position laterally. 

Ruling: Foul. False start by Al. Official 
should throw foul marker immediately and, 
if possible, prevent the ball from becoming 
alive. Start clock on the succeeding snap. 

38. Play: Ineligible Al is legally several 
yards beyond the neutral zone because of 
having driven Bl back from the line. For- 
ward pass by A2 accidentally touches in- 
eligible Al and is then deflected and: (a) 
eligible A3 catches pass ; or (b) pass is in- 
tercepted by B3. 

Ruling: Pass is completed in both (a) and 
(b) and ball may be advanced. The accidental 
touching by Al is ignored. 

39. Play: 2nd down-8 on A's 30. Al ad- 
vances ball to B's 40 where he throws an 
illegal forward pass which is caught by A2, 
who is downed on B's 30. During the illegal 
forward pass A3 holds on the 50. What are 
B's options? 

Ruling: If B accepts the penalty for the 
illegal forward pass, it will be 1st down-10 
for A on B's 45. If B accepts the penalty for 
the holding by A3, it will be 2nd down-3 for 
A on B's 35. If B declines both penalties 
it will be A's ball on B's 30, 1st down-10. 

40. Play : Runner Al loses shoe. After ball 
becomes dead, he recovers and replaces it 
without assistance, consuming about 25 
seconds. Is this a Referee's or a charged team 
time-out? 

Ruling: The loss of a shoe while running 
is considered an emergency. If Al recovered 
and replaced it immediately without assist- 
ance, it would be a Referee's time-out. How- 
ever, if there were aid — even such as throw- 
ing out a roll of tape from the bench to se- 
cure the shoe, it would necessitate charging 
the team with a time-out. 

Comment: Some groups have considered 
the maximum time for an equipment repair 
Official's time-out to be approxiately 30 
seconds. Longer than 30 seconds has been 
considered an excessive delay and the time- 
out is transferred to the team and charged. 

41. Play: With a few seconds remaining in 
the half, a kick-off is caught or recovered by 
Rl and he advances to his 40. During his run, 
Kl commits a personal foul and time expires 
during the down. What is the proper pro- 
cedure? 

Ruling: At the time the foul is committed, 
Kl is on defense. Hence, this is a foul by the 



defense. The period is extended by one un- 
timed down if penalty is accepted. Since 
this as a foul during a running play, penalty 
is measured from spot where the run ended, 
i.e., R's 40. It would be R's ball to snap on 
K's 45. 

42. Play. Al advances beyond the line and 
then throws an illegal forward pass which 
is intercepted by Bl, B2 clips during the 
runback by Bl. 

Ruling: Double foul. Replay. Both team A 
and team B foul during the same down and 
before the penalty for either foul is accepted 
or declined. 

43. Play : 4th down-5 on K's 25. Scrimmage 
kick is muffed by Rl on K's 45. While it is 
rolling, a personal foul is committed on K's 
35: (a) by R2; or (b) by K2. In either case, 
R3 secures possession on K's 40. 

Ruling: Since kick is always in possession 
of team K, ball belongs to K if penalty is ac- 
cepted in either (a) or (b). The 15 yards are 
measured from previous spot. The next down 
is lst-10 in either case. 

44. Play: 4th down-3. A forward pass 
throwni by Al from behind the line crosses 
the line and accidently touches: (a) in- 
eligible A2 who is illegally beyond the line; 
or (b) ineligible A3 who has legally driven 
an opponent through the neutral zone down- 
field. In either (a) or (b), eligible All 
catches the pass for an 8-yard gain. 

Ruling : In (a) , it is pass interference with 
loss of 15 from previous spot. Down counts 
so it is 1st down-10 for B. If B declines pen- 
alty, it is 1st down-10 for A. In (b), because 
A3 was legally downfield and the ball ac- 
cidently touched him, the touching is ignored. 
1st down-10 for A where ball became dead. 

45. Play: Kl punts from the 50. Rl muffs 
on R's 40. K3 recovers ball on K's 45 (be- 
hind the line). After the muff but before 
K3 recovers, K2 holds on R's 40. 

Ruling: If R accepts penalty, it will be 
measured from the previous spot (the 50) 
and it will be K's ball, 1st down-10 on K's 35. 
If R declines the penalty, it will be K's 
ball on K's 45, 1st down-10. 

46. Play: Team A desires to use plastic 
drinking cup with top cut out for a kicking 
tee. 

Ruling: Illegal, based on Rule 2-12-2. A 
plastic or firm paper cup is not considered 
pliable. The rule also requires that the lowest 
point of the ball, when placed upon a tee, 
be 1 inch or less above the ground. If drink- 
ing cups or such devices are used, the ball is 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1958 



Page Eleven 



nearly always more than an inch above the 
ground when it is kicked. 

47. Play : Forward pass by Al from the 50 
to A2 is completed and A2 is run out-of- 
bounds on B's 10 yardline, Bl commits for- 
ward pass interference and, after the ball is 
dead out-of-bounds, B2 commits a personal 
foul. The foul by B2 is committed before A 
has accepted or declined the penalty for the 
foul by Bl. 

Ruling: Multiple foul. Team A has choice 
of penalty for interference or for dead ball 
foul. In the case cited, A would, of course, 
accept the penalty for the dead ball foul. 



Football Championships 

Early in September the principals of K.H.- 
S.A.A. member schools which have eleven- 
man football teams were asked to vote on a 
plan for determining a state championship in 
football beginning in 1959. The administra- 
tors were asked to approve play-offs for three 
classes of schools and to accept the suggested 
regulations presented by the Board of Con- 
trol. The results of the voting were to be 
reported to the Board at its October meeting. 
Given below are the tentative rules and regu- 
lations which were presented to the prin- 
cipals. 

Suggested Rules and Regulations Govern- 
ing K.H.S.A.A. Football Championships 

I. Classification 

Sec. A. The Board of Control shall divide 
the schools into three groups as follows: 

1. Class AAA will be the schools in Jeffer- 
son County. 

2. Class AA will be the schools with an 
enrollment of 275 or more in grades 10^12. 

3. Class A will be the schools with an en- 
rollment of less than 275 in grades 10-12. 

Sec. B. The basis for determining the 
schools of classes AA and A will be the total 
enrollment in grades 10-12 of a coeducational 
school. The Board may make an upward 
enrollment adjustment for a school with less 
than a full high school course, and for schools 
enrolling boys only. 

Sec. C. Classification shall be for a period 
of two years. Classification for 1959 and 1960 
will be based on 1957-58 enrollments. Schools 
will be notified of their classification not 
later than December 1, 1958. A school, on 
application of the principal to the Com- 
missioner, may be permitted to move from a 
lower to a higher classification. Such a re- 
quest must be filed by December 31, 1958. 



Any school placed in a higher classification 
must remain in this classification until all 
schools are reclassified. 

II. Regional Championship 

Sec. A. The state will be divided into a 
maximum of four regions in each class. 
Regional lines will not be the same for all 
classes. 

Sec. B. The championship will be deter- 
mined by the Dickinson system. A secretary 
will be appointed by the Commissioner for 
compiling information needed to determine 
the regional champion. Games played 
through the weekend prior to the semi-final 
games will be counted in determining the 
regional champions. 

Sec. C. To qualify for a regional champ- 
ionship, a team shall play a minimum of five 
games in its class within the region. Upon 
presentation of evidence to the Commission- 
er to show that a school can not secure the 
required number of games in its region, the 
Commissioner mny authorize such a school 
to substitute one game with a team of the 
same classification in another region in 
order to qualify for the regional champion- 
ship. 

Sec. D. In any case where two teams have 
played each other more than once, the first 
game only shall count in the regional stand- 
ings. 

Sec. E. The principal who wishes to enter 
his football team in the play-offs shall advise 
the Commissioner accordingly on or before 
Mav 1 nrior to the season involved. 

III. Play-offs 

Sec. A. In class AAA the winner of region 
1 will play the winner of region 2 for the 
championship on the weekend prior to 
Thanksgiving. 

Sec. B. In classes AA and A the winners of 
region 1 and region 2 will play, and the win- 
ners of region 3 and res-ion 4 will play in the 
semi-final games on the weekend prior to 
Thanksgiving. Winners of the semi-final 
games will play for the championship of each 
class prior to December 1. 

Sec. C. If the championship game results 
in a tied score, the teams will be declared co- 
champions. 

Sec. D. If a semi-final game results in a 
tied score, the following noint system will 
determine the winners: 1) one point for 
most penetration of the opponent's twenty- 
yard line. 2) one nnint for the greater num- 
iser of first downs 3") one point for the great- 
er net yardage. If the teams are still tied 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1958 



after the point system mentioned is applied, 
then the winner will be the team with the 
greater net yardage. 

Sec. E. The semi-final sites will be deter- 
mined in the odd numbered years by the win- 
ners in region 1 and region 3, and the even 
numbered years by the winners in region 2 
and region 4. The site for the final game in 
each class will be determined by the Board 
of Control. 

IV. Finances 

Sec. A. The proceeds of the semi-final 
games in each class will be used to defray 
the expenses of the visiting team, officials, 
trophies for the regional winners, and other 
incidental expense';. Net profit or loss will be 
shared by the comDeting schools. If no agree- 
ment on the visiting team expenses can be 
reached, the followinof shall be allowed: trans- 
portation 50c per mile, round trip; maximum 
number of seven meals for thirty-eight per- 
sons at $1.50 ; lodging, maximum of two 
nights. 

Sec. B. The proceeds of the final frames in 
each class shall accrue to the K.H.S.A.A. 
after the nece^^sarv expenses have been paid. 
Exnenses for the ti'aveling team shall be the 
same as given above, and a team not renuir- 
ino" transDortation. meals, or lodging shall re- 
ceive $100.00 for miscellaneous expenses. 



NATIONAL FEDERATION MEETING 

(Continued from Page Seven) 

Hawes (Oresron), C. E. Forsvtlne (Michia-an). John 
Roberts (Wisconsin"). W. H. VanHerhoef (Npw Yorl<), 
C. E. Wetmore (Wisconsin). Herman KeHer (In- 
Hiana), Lyle Quinn (Iowa). R. M. Walseth (South 
Dakota), L. C. Ansorsre (Wisconsin), L. H. Holl- 
way (Michig'an), Harold Schmicklev (Iowa), E. W. 
Coolev (Iowa G. A. A.), T. A. Sanford fKentuckv^, 
H. W. Emswiler (Ohio), and W. W. Russell (Cali- 
fornia). 

The business meetinsr of the National Council 
convened at 8:00 P. M.. Wednesday niarht, June 25, 
with President Homer Williams presidiner. A anorum 
was present, and voting- members were seateH as 
previously designated. Favorable action was taken 
on the application of the District of Columbia In- 
terscholastic Athletic Division for membership in 
the National Federation. Several questionable pro- 
motions, as discussed in earlier sessions- were men- 
tioned as needing: the attention of all of those 
interested in the welfare of school athletics. Leon 
Brigrham (Washington board member) presented a 
statement drawn un by a committee as a result of 
discussion at the Monday morning session of Board 
of Control members. After much discussion, the 
statement was revised to the effect that the National 
Council recommend that the National Federation 
Executive Committee set up proper machinery for 
making a survey of possible desirable action in the 
direction of: (1) making: it possible for Board of 
Control members to indicate sentiment as to the 



number of sessions at the annual meeting which 
might profitably be set aside for divisional meet- 
ings; (2) adopting- specific policies about the var- 
ious Federation meetings and the publication of such 
policies in the Federation literature; and (3) study- 
ing the need or lack of need for meetings of divi- 
sional groups associated with the Federation and, 
if it appears that there is need for such meetings, 
to give them official standing so that member State 
Association Boards of Control may be guided in 
their allocation of expenses for such meetings. This 
revised statement, as approved by the committee, 
was adopted without dissenting- vote. 

The Treasurer's Report was presented and sup- 
plemented by complete copy of all documents involv- 
ed in the auditor's report and copy of all securities in 
the Federation General (Endowment) Fund and in 
the Federation Retirement Fund. It also included a 
complete statement of the funds allocated to the 
Mutual Legal Aid Pact. 

Representatives from Sections .3, 6 and 7 had 
held one or more caucuses respectively and agreed 
upon candidates to represent their sections. In Sec- 
tion 7, two caucuses were held because of certain 
differences of opinion caused primarily by lack of 
background facts concerning the election and pre- 
vious agreements connected with the choosing of 
candidates. The following were nominated and 
regularly elected by unanimous vote: for Section 3, 
S. F. Burke (Georgia), for a term of three years to 
1961; for Section 6, H. J. Goetz (Montana), to com- 
plete the three-year term of C. H. Hancock to 
1960; for Section 7, Willard R. Knowles (California) 
for a three-year term to 1961 

There was a brief discussion of 1959 Meeting 
Plans. It was announced that the January meetings 
of the National Alliance Football Committee, the 
Executive Committee and State Executive Officers 
will be in New Orleans. The probable dates are 
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, January 5-7, 1959, 
with the Executive Committee meeting on Sunday, 
January 4. 

By unanimous vote, the Executive Secretary 
was instructed to express the great apnreciation of 
the entire group for the unusuallv fine welcome 
which had been extended through machinery set up 
by the California Interscholastic Federation. 



NEW BASKETBALL FILM 

(Continued from Four) 

A fantastic dream sequence where im- 
possible and nightmarish situations can and 
do arise is the continuitv thread used 
throughout BASKETBALL FOR MILLIONS 
to depict: Accepted officiating procedures, 
problems created by double fouls and false 
double fouls, tricky situations connected with 
front and back court, jump ball infractions 
and procedures, little understood distinction 
between player and team control, and a pano- 
rama of basic rule fundamentals. 

Color prints of the film have been rented 
by the K.H.S.A.A. and placed on loan with 
the Department of University Extension, 
University of Kentucky. 



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No. 2620J— A Sand Knitting Mills Heavy Jersey Weave. 
Button Front Coat Sweater — 100% pure wool and one 
of our most popular honor garments. Stock colors — 
Royal, Kellv, Scarlet, Black, Old Gold, White, Maroon, 
Purple: each $10.65 

8" letters $2.05; chenille bars, 40c each; 

;ach. Delivery of woven service stripes 

and requires three weeks for delivery. 



ALL PRICES CpUOTED ARE WHOLESALE SCHOOL PRICES— NOT RETAIL PRICES. 



^'TOJFFE col 




OUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 




High khooi Athkfe 

NEW DAVIESS COUNTY SCHOOL PLANT 





The Daviess County High School was dedicated on October 26, 1958. The total cost of the 
building and grounds was $1,925,000. It will accommodate 1,000 students. The gymnasium 
i will seat 3,500, and the auditorium 1,024. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
NDVEMBER - 135B 





Pictured above is the gymnasium interior of 
the new Daviess County High School. This is a 
double gymnasium, with an electrically controlled 
partition making it possible to conduct two physical 
education classes simultaneously. The lower picture 
shows the front of the building. In an attractive 
brochure, which was prepared for the dedicatory 
exercises of the Daviess County High School, the 
following features of the new building were listed: 
acoustical plastered ceilings, public address system, 
display cases in every department, gates to isolate 
public areas, sheltered bus wralkways, dark room, 
gas heat, fluorescent lighting except in drawing' 
rooms, shale block construction with face brick, 
mirrors at end of all corridors, cential location of 
foyer, upholstered seats in auditorium, telescopic 
bleachers, electric folding partition in gymnasium, 
soundproof recording room in Music Department, 
acoustical ceiling and walls in Music Department, 
Science Department - combination classroom and 



laboratory, folding partitions in different depart- 
ments for space working areas, self contained class- 
rooms in Commercial and Home Economics Depart- 
ments, skylights, fiber glass furniture, air condition- 
ing in auditorium, cafeteria and Music Department, 
air circulating system throughout building, complete 
laundry service for Athletic Department. 

Under the "Costs" heading, the following ap- 
peared: total cost, $1,925,000; cost of site, $61,810; 
general contract, $900,855.75; plumbing, heating, 
ventilating contract, $301,216; electrical contract, 
$105,000; air conditioning $27,350; contract for 
stadium, $45,000; total cost of construction, $1,379,- 
421.75; construction per square foot $10.94; con- 
struction per cubic foot, $.63%; paving around build- 
ing, $18,450; construction of road through campus 
from Highway 231 to Highway 71, $4,915.55; gas 
line, $15,525.35; sewer line, $64,576.38; water line, 
$15, 972.25; grading, $24,945. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XXI— No. 4 



NOVEMBER, 1958 



$1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Basketball Questions — Installment 1 

confusion and a frequently interrupted count. 

6. Play: Al passes ball across end line and the 
ball, before touching: anything else, strikes B6, who 
is a substitute, sitting- on the bench. 

Ruling-: B's ball out of bounds. A substitute is not 
a player. He ma.v become a player by legally enter- 
ing the court and replacing- a teammate. 

7. Play: After a successful field goal during the 
last few seconds, ball rolls into the bleachers so 
that Official must stop clock. Should Official order 
the clock started as soon as he has retrieved the 
ball and handed it to the thrower-in? 

Ruling: No. The rules make no provision for start- 
ing the clock before the throw-in touches a player 
on the court. 

8. Play: Team A is ahead by 4 points -with about 
4 seconds to g'O. After a field goal by Bl, Al grabs 
the ball for the throw-in. He intends to consume 
the 4 seconds with the throw-in. The trailing Official 
notices the net is looped over the ring covering 
the basket opening. Should the clock be stopped for 
straightening the net? If so, when is it started? 

Ruling: Since an interception of the throw-in by 
B and a quick try for goal is possible, the Official 
should not gamble. The clock should be stopped 
and the net straightened. The clock will start when 
the throw-in touches a player on the court. 

Comment: If the net is manufactured according 
to rules specifications and, therefore, legal, it will 
not likely swing over the top of the basket and 
cover the opening. 

9. Play: Al is gTanted a time-out. A is ready to 
to play in about 20 seconds but B is not ready. 

Ruling: Team B is not entitled to the remaining 
time unless they are willing to be charged -with a 
time-out. Of course, an allowance should be made 
by the Official if B has been permitted to leave 
the court to get a drink or for some similar reason 
on the assumption they will have time to return 
during the normal time-out. 

10. Play: Al is simultaneously pushed by both Bl 
and B2 so that a multiple foul is called. If it is 
after team B has committed four personal fouls in 
the half, does the bonus penalty apply to either 
or both fouls ? 

Ruling: The bonus penalty is associated only with 
a "common" foul. A multiple foul is not a common 
foul and consequently the bonus rule never applies 
to an element of a multiple foul. 

11. Play: Al has ball out of bounds at designated 
spot for throw-in from A's end of court. A2 is also 
out of bounds near Al and A2 makes no effort to 
return inbounds. Then just before the throw-in, A2 
steps inbounds and receives the throw-in. 

Ruling: Technical foul. A2 may not delay his re- 
turn to the court after being leg-ally out of bounds. 

12. Play: Al and A2 have possession of the ball 



Editor's Note : These rulings do not set aside or m 
rule. They are interpretations on some of the ear 
situations which have been presented. 

1. Play: Three minutes before game time. Captain 
of A designates his five starting- players. One minute 
before game time he announces a replacement for 
a starting player. 

Ruling: Replacing one of the five players listed 
to start is a technical foul unless the Referee be- 
lieves there are extenuating- circumstances. If there 
are no extenuating circumstances, there may be re- 
placements at the expense of a technical foul (team 
foul). 

2. Play: Rule 6-1 states each period must begin 
with a jump ball. Does this apply when a technical 
foul occurs if before the start of the period? 

Ruling: Any rules statement is based on the as- 
sumption the situation is not complicated by an in- 
fraction or by an occurrence such as a double foul or 
the ending of a period. This assumption is in ac- 
cordance with the definition of a "rule", as stated 
in Rule 4-16-A. When an infraction does occur, the 
specific rule about the infraction takes precedence 
over any general statement. This pi-inciple has a 
bearing in answering the above question. If a tech- 
nical foul occurs prior to the start of the game or 
any period, the penalty is enforced and play pro- 
ceeds the same as after any enforcement. An illus- 
tration is the committing of a technical foul for 
having illegal numbei's. When this is discovered be- 
fore the ball is tossed for the first jump, a free throw 
is awarded and play continues with the throw-in 
as after any technical foul. In this case, the period 
is not started with a jump ball. 

3. Play: Where is mid-court, for pui-poses of a 
throw-in, on a court which has two division lines ? 

Ruling: It is always opposite the center circle 
i-egardless of the length of the court. 

4. Play: Prior to a free throw by Al, no player 
of A choosess to occupy one of the second alleys. 
How long must B wait before stepping into the 
vacant alley? 

Ruling: No specific time is stated. W'henever such 
alley is vacant, B may step into it. However, it 
will be necessary for B to make way for a player of 
A if player of A desires the space before the throw- 
ing motion begins. 

5. Play: After ball has been handed to free throw- 
er Al, A2 walks into the lane to give the thrower 
an encouraging pat or to a position on the other 
side. A2 is in position before the throw. Has he 
committed a violation ? 

Ruling: Yes, provided the Official has waited a 
reasonable time for customary adjustments before 
handing Al the ball. 

Comment: It is necessary to have a fixed time 
after which the lane may not be entered. If this 
were up to the time of the throw, it would lead to 



(Continued on Page Nine) 



I 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1958 



NOVEMBER, 1958 VOL. XXI— NO. 4 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington. Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-601. Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-611. Marion 

Directors— W. B. Jones. (1957-61) Somerset: W. H. Crowdus 
(1958-621 Franklin; Jack Dawson (1958-62). Louisville: Robert 
P. Forsythe (1955-591. Greenville: K. G. Gillaspie (1955-59), 
Georgetown: Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60). Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jrotn the Commlsslone'i s Dffi 



tee 



REPORTS NOW DUE 

1. 1958 Football Participation List 

2. School's Rep(3i-t on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



National Federation Basketball Test 

Part II of the National Federation basket- 
ball examination will be given all over Ken- 
tucky on Monday, December 1, to officials 
who wish to work for the "approved" and 
"certified" ratings. Officials registered with 
the K.H.S.A.A. for the first time this year, 
and who have not been registered previously 
in any other state associations, are not elig- 
ible to take the test. Those interested should 
advise the State Office immediately in or- 
der that necessary arrangements can be 
made with the school administrators who 
will supervise the taking of the exam. Of- 
ficials living in Kentucky need not suggest 
the name of an examiner. The "approved" 
rating does not carry forward from year to 
year, but must be earned each year. After 
an official has received the "certified" rating, 
he keeps this rating by attending clinics 
■"Aithout having to continue to take the exam 
each year. 

State Tournament Reservations 

The 1959 State Hieh School Basketball 
Tournament will be held in Lexington on 
March 18-21. On October 22 each principal 
of a K.H.S.A.A. member school and all city 
and county superintendents were mailed an- 
nouncements concerning reservations for 
lodging during tournament time. In this an- 
nouncement it was stated that the period 
of November 1-15 has been designated as 
the First Priority Period in the matter of 
making reservations for rooms. 



A Housing Committee, set up by the Lex- 
ington Chamber of Commerce, will assist 
with lodging reservations, giving first con- 
sideration to school representatives who live 
in distant parts of the state and to those 
whose reservations begin Wednesday night, 
March 18. Requests for lodging reservations 
should be addressed to: Lexington Chamber 
of Commerce, 239 North Broadway, Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky. 

The Second Priority Period will be from 
November 15 to December 1, and will apply 
to others who plan to attend the tourna- 
ment. School officials should advise their 
patrons concerning this period through ar- 
ticles in their local or county newspapers. 
Approved and Certified Officials 

Twenty-three football officials have quali- 
fied for the "certified" rating this fall, and 
eleven for the "approved" rating. These of- 
ficials are: 

Certified Officials — James L. Barlow, 
Thomas Bell, Howard Bennett, Richard Betz, 
George W. Brown, E. C. Caiman, Jr., Travis 
Combs, John S. Crosthwaite, Jr., Jack H. 
Durkin, Carl Elovitz, Robert H. Florence, 
W. H. Gammon, Gene Harris, Fletcher Hole- 
man, Bernard Johnson, Carl Lawson, Bob 
McCollum, Edgar McNabb, Bill Nau, Doug 
Noland, K. F. Schmitt, John H. Shaw, Clifton 
Stone. 

Approved Officials — Frank Hall, Frank 
Heinze, John G. Heinz, John B. Jeter, E. B. 
May, Jr., William Mordica, James Moss, Don 
C. Sullivan, David G. Van Meter, Ray G. 
Varner, Paul R. Walker. 



Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the K.H.S.A.A. 
met at the K.H.S.A.A. building, Lexington, 
on Saturday morning, October 11, 1958. 
The meeting was called to order by President 
Russell Williamson at 10:00, with all Board 
members. Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, 
and Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield 
present. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by Cecil 
A. Thornton, that the reading of the minutes 
of the July 25th meeting be waived, since 
the members of the Board had received 
copies of these minutes. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

W. H. Crowdus, Chairman of the Foot- 
ball Championship Committee, reported that 
balloting on the proposed football play-offs 
had resulted in a vote of 80-17 in favor of 
the tentative plan set up by the Board of 
Control. There was a general discussion of 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1958 



Page Three 



some of the problems involved in setting up 
the proposed plan. W. H. Crowdus moved, 
seconded by Cecil A. Thorton, that the foot- 
ball play-offs be set up, beginning in 1959, 
and that the Commissioner be authorized to 
determine by the next meeting if possible 
the classifications desired for their teams 
by the school principals. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner gave a short report of 
the recent survey which had been made con- 
cerning the certification and duties of 
K.H.S.A.A. coaches. Since the statistical in- 
formation requested had not been received 
from all Association member schools, it was 
suggested that the final report on non- 
complying schools be deferred until the De- 
cember meeting of the Board. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by W. 
H. Crowdus, that the next meeting of the 
Board of Control be held in Lexington on 
December 20, 1958. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by Cecil 
A. Thornton, that all bills of the Association 
for the period beginning July 25, 1958, and 
ending October lOi, 1958 be allowed. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

The Board was then called to order in its 
capacity as Board of Directors of the K.H.S. 
A.A. Protection Fund. 

Secretary-Treasurer Sanford presented 
the list of claims which had been paid by 
the Protection Fund for the period beginning 
July 25, 1958, and ending October 10, 1958, 
the total amount of these claims being 
$3,155.49. 

W. B. Jones moved, seconded by Louis 
Litchfield, that the claims as presented by 
the Secretary-Treasurer be allowed. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meet- 
ing adjourned. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
MEMBER SCHOOLS OF THE K.H.S.A.A. 



(List compiled 
Booker T. Washington 

(Ashland) 
Brodhead 
Bryan Station 

(Lexington) 
Camargo 

(Mt. Sterling) 
Charleston 

(Dawson Springs) 
Clay County 

(Manchester) 
College 

(Bowling Green) 



November 1) 
Combs Memorial 

(Jeff) 
Crittenden County 

(Marion) 
Douglass 

(Henderson) 
East Benham 

(Benham) 
Eubank 
Ezel 

Fancy Farm 
Feds Creek 
Garrett 



Guthrie 

Haldeman 

Laurel 

(Camp Dix) 
Lebanon 
Lincoln 

(Stanford) 
Livingston Central 

(Burna) 
Lone Oak 
Louisa 
Madisonville 
Mason 

(Lancaster) 
Nicholas County 

(Carlisle) 
Oneida Institute 
Pleasant View 



Rosenwald 

(Providence) 
Rosenwald-Dunbar 

( Nicholas ville) 
Russell County 

(Russell Springs) 
St. Aloysius 

(Shepherdsville) 
St. Charles 

(Lebanon) 
Shepherdsville 
Stearns 
Todd County Training 

(Elkton) 
Wayland 
William Grant 

(Covington) 
Wolfe County 

(Campton) 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List compiled November 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Bandy, Jack R., .Jones St.. Harlan, 2649 

Betz, Dick, 250 Albany Rd., Lexington, 7-5610, 2-1640 

Hick, Charles R., 9907 Donnerail Way, Valley Station, WE 

7-3082, Ft. Kno.x 4458 
Butcher, DeVoil, Chapmanville, W. Va. 
Craig, Handy, 4676 Delhi Hoad, Cincinnati, Ohio, BL 1-1650, 

PA 1-5050 
Detenber, Gene, 229 Tyne Ed., Louisville, TW 5-7058, JU 4-8465 
Ernst, Edward R., P. 0. Box 68, Hebron, MU 97181, EA 1-6758 
Feige, Alvin Faust, 2114 Emerson, Louisville, GL 8-2478 
Figg, Charles Raymond, 1008 Navaho, Frankfort, CA 7-2146, 

CA 3-0565 
F;shback, Olen Wayne, 9720 Galene, Jeffersontown, AN 7-1700 
Gibbons, E. G., 6928 Kurd Ave., Cincinnati 27, Ohio, BR 1-2680, 

MU 1-2203 
Grace, Hickory E., Jr., Middlesboro, 413-J 
McMullan, Cecil, Route 2, Golden Pond, Walker 4-5504 
Pace, John Duncan. Ky. Mili. Inst., Lyndon, TW 6-1701 
Pate, Lloyd W., 1011 Joyce Lane, Nashville 6, Tennessee, 

CO 2-2916, 44-73626 
Potter, W. H., Jr., 605 Walnut Avenue, Paintsville, 248, 1017 
Rhatigan, Alfred, 5416 Eastwood Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

BR 2-0118, EL 1-6400, Ext. 7 
Rogers, Harry K., 76 Blade Ave.. Frankfort, 3-8236, 7-4511 
Schad, James E.. 10717 Chelmsford Road, Cincinnati 40, Ohio, 

PR 1-5495, El 1-3040 
Tucker, William (Bill), 27 Lisle Lane, Winchester, 2143, 

2-2200 Ijjxington 
Wayne, Sherrill, 204 Claremont, Louisville 6 
Williams, James H., 2428 Adams, Ashland, E 6-2733, E 4-8282 
Zimmer, Thomas W., 555 Pike St., Covington, Di 1-4566, 

He 1-4272 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List compiled November 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adams, Cecil Edward, 1004 2nd Street, Grayson, GR4-6621 
Babbage, Donald R., 1500 Phyllis, Louisville, EM 7-7243, 

JU 2-3859 
Ball, Denver. 1428 Wurts Ave., Ashland, EA 4-05311, 1140 

Raceland 
Ballard, Jack H., 128 Pine St., Barbourville, 453, 472 
Ballinger. Richard L., 820 E. Washington, Louisville 
Barker, Harold, 3134 Oakland Ave., Catlettsburg, Park 402, 328 
Barlow, Billy, Route 5. Paris. 1095W 
Barnes. Judson. Cawood, 1974-J, 1440 

Barrett, John D., P. O. Box 331, Beaver Dam, BR 4-4714 
Benedict., Johnny, P. O. Box 263, Virgie, 12 (Bus. No.) 
Berryman, Robert R., 846 N. Madison, Beaver Dam, BR 4-3429 
Betz, Dick, 260 Albany Rd., Lexington, 7-5610, 2-1640 
Black, Amos, 325 Moreland. Harrodsburg, 1490, 711-J 
Blackburn. Clyde W., Box 26. London. 620-X, 575 
Blanton. Clayton, Pathfork. MO 4-2039, Cumberland College 



Boyle 



Paul E., Box 694, Russell, Oak 928 

203 Goodwin St., Corbin. 891-W, 604 
Bob, 27 Hollywood, Florence, AT3-5484. RE 1-6000 
. Charles W., Mt. Washington, KE 8-4539, KE 8-4235 
C. R., 1241/2 Second St., Silver Grove, Hi 1-5271 



Page Pour 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1958 



Brown, James A.. Wayne Dr., Hopkinsville, TU 5-5600 (Bus No.) 

Brown, James W., 122 Lancaster. Richmond, 1558, 1775-79 

Burton, Charlie, Harrodsburg, 252-J 

Butcher, Paul, Pikeville, GE 7-7529, GE 7-9145 

Butts, Delbert, 212 Mulbery, Carlisle, 144-J, 144-R 

Calhoun, Foster "Tubby", Hindman, 1602 

Capps. Jerry. Calvert City 

Carpenter, Bill, P. O. Bo.x 12, Bowling Green, VI 2-1253, 

VI 2-1253 
Cartee, Ralph, Jr., Olive Hill, FA 6-3562, FA 6-2061 
Carter, Clifton, 617 Emberton, Tompkinsville, Ha 7-5686 
Cassady, Charles W., 1127 Kentucky St., Bowling Green, 

3-9538 
Gates, Vernon, Sedalia 

Coakley, Robert D., Rineyville School. Rineyville. 327-M 
Cohen, Robert, 248 Larch Ln., Le.xington, 2-8956, 5-3880 
Conley, Tom W., Paintsville, 542 iBus. No.J 
Corley, William H., 304 W. Oak, Nicholasville, 222-R 
Co.\, Ralph, 404 Spruce, Benham, 2136 
Creamer, Billy H., Lafayette, BR 1-2168 

Cunningham, Julian R.. Sharpsburg, 2361. 1500 Mt. Sterling 
Denney, B. L., 1420 Packard St., Ashland, East 4-8464 
Diachenko. Nick C. P. O. Box 290. Jenkins 
Dotson, W. S., 432 E. 5th St.. Lexington, 25131. 40360 
Duerson, Guy K., Jr., Short St., Berea, 285, 184 
Duncan, Earl S., 10,007 Taylorsville Rd., Jeffersontown, 

AM 7-1478, TW 5-5920 
Elder, Robert J., Box 446, Morehead State College, Morehead 

Morehead Police, 4-12 P. M. (Bus. No.) 
Eldridge, James R., P. O. Box 337, Morehead State College, 

Morehead 
Elliott, Carroll L., 214 Sunset Rd., Elizabethtown, RO 5-9707, 

RO 5-6118 
England. James, Pikeville 
Ernst, Ed R., P. O. Box 68, Hebron 
Fairchild, Gene P., 3517 Clinton Rd., Box 38, Paducah. 3-4385, 

2-4001 
Falls, Harold B., Morehead State College. Morehead 
Fanning, Homer, 18 BelAir Ave., Winchester, 1696-R, Le.x- 

ington 2-2200, Ext. 2105 
Figg, Charles Raymond. 1008 Navaho Trail, Frankfort, CA 

7-2146, CA 3-0565 
Firestine, Frank V., Jr., 244 Cardinal Rd.. Russell, 926. 390 
Florence, T. G., Boston, TE 3-4714, FI 8-8537 
Flynn, Bobby, 110 Halls Lane. Lexington 4-7924, 2-9474 
Flynn, Reynolds. 1440 Cypress St., Paris, 277 
Foster, Joseph W., 821 Carneal Rd., Lexington, 4-8058, 3-3335 
Francis, George, Sassafras 

Fuller, John R.. Route 4, Paducah, 3-3773, 3-5626 
Gabbard, John B., 320 N. Hill. London, Vo 4-5915, Vo 4-2863 
Gary, Robert, P. O. Box 73, College Station, Murray, 1421 
Gill, Joe, Slemp, 9843F12 (Bus. No. I 
Gilvin. Allie F., 1657 Winchester, Cincinnati. Ohio. BE 1-6009, 

BE 1-8292, Ext. 6 
Gotf, Reathel, Cromwell 

Coins, Herman. Box 40, Gatliff Route, Williamsburg 
Goodin, Charles L., 215 Summit Dr., Pineville, Edgewood 

7-2365, Edgewood 7-2151 
Goodin, Shirley G., Four Mile, Edgewood 7-2031. Pineville 
Goranflo, Robert E., 133 Bonner, Louisville. TW 5-2805, 

CH 5-4161 
Gorrell, Howard, P. O. Box 41, Elkton. CO 5-2813 
Gourley, Harold E., 1700 N. Alvord Blvd., Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 6-6191, HA 3-4016 
Grace, Hickory E., Jr., Middlesboro, 413-J 
Greathouse. Bobby, Old Scottsville Road. Bowling Green. 

VI 2-2568 
Hayes, Douglas J., Branham Ave., Morehead 
Hensley, Robert B., Horse Cave, ST 6-4163 
Hicks, Floyd Eugene, 3308 Grace Ave., Covington, He 1-8380, 

Ma 1-2395 
Hightower, Kenneth, Box 88, Western Ky. State College, 

Bowling Green VI 3-9182, 3-9245 
Hildreth, David P., 150 Alumni Ave., Hopkinsville, To 5-5974, 

Hopkinsville High 
Hill, Jimmie. Gausdale 
Holcomb, Joe. Boston 

Holt, Robert E., Sanderson Dr.. Hopkinsville, 6-1738, 6-1207 
Hughes, Charles F., Wayland, 4881, 3491 
Hutchens. Jim D., P. O. Box 103. Belfry. 2458 
Hyatt, Bob. 1291 Airway Ct.. Louisville 5, Glendale 8-1565, 

Juniper, 7-8611 
Ison, Glennon B., Flemingsburg, 6151, 4431 
James. Gene. 315 Park Ave.. Ironton, Ohio, 4533, 3699 
Johnson, Charles W., P. O. Box 100. Virgie, Virgie 28 
Johnson, James R., Route 3. Crofton. HA 4-6049, TU .5-5324 
Junker, Edwin, 1045 W. Sycamore, Cincinnati 16, Ohio, VA 

14117, VA 12322 
Kinney, Hall M., 201 Webster Ave., Cynthiana. 537-W, 298 
Knight, Bill, 752 N. 36th, Paducah, 3-2775. 3-2775 
Kok, George W.. 9406 Janna Dr.. Valley Station, We 7-5436 
Kurry, P.F.C. Thomas G., Hq&Hq Co.. Ft. Knox. 2225, 2832 
Lafferty, Clyde E., Box 866. Morehead State College, Morehead 
Lankert, Norman E., 307 N. Sherwood, Clarksville, Ind., 

BU 2-3368 
Lefevers, Jasper Newt. Jr., Cardinal, Morris 4-2037 
Lewis, Jack C, Box 748. Pineville. Ed 7-2481 
Liles, Billy C. Box 245 College Station, Murray 
Littlepage, Pryce, 124 W. Broadway, Madisonville 



Longo, Dick, 4th & Broadway, McAllister Auditorium, Lexing- 
ton 
Loudy. Kenneth, Slemp 
McBrlde, Kenneth, 157 St. William Dr., Lexington, 4-8287, 

3-3335 Station 1 
McClaskey, Booker, Boston, TE 3-4725, 4916-6131, Ft. Knox 
McClellan, Amos E., 3739 Penway Ave., Louisville 10, Spring 

4-1071, JU 7-1292 
Mahan, Boyd W., 8 Circle Dr., Florence, AT 3-3335, Locust 

1-8686 
Manasco, Estel, Box 1732, Austin Peay State College, Clarksville, 

Tennessee 
Meadors, Chester, Route 2, Box 48, Williamsburg, 4232 
Mereditn, Denny E., Jr., 637 E. Walnut St., Louisville, JU 

2-1941, JU 4-4658 
Meadows, Marvin R., Clayhole 

Miles, I'rancis, 1142 So. 36th St., Louisville, SP 6-2331 
Mills, Herman, Lovely, 4092 

Monroe, Robert W., 501 W. Poplar St., Elizabethtown, Ro 5-4900 
Moore, Ed, South Shore 
Murphy, Donald J., 8875 Long Lane, Cincinnati 31, Ohio, 

WE 1-3189, WE 1-3189 
Nail, Samuel, 1614 Main St., Murray, 1730 
Nelson, William O., Greenville, 639-W, 442-J 

Newsom, Lawrence R., 1949 Belfonte, Lexington, 7-1779, 4-9116 
Newton, Reason G., Lebanon Junction, Te 3-4683 
Noble, Leonard, Jackson, No 6-2430, No 6-9224 
Noel, George E., South Portsmouth, FL 2-1271 
Oldham, Cnarles, 134 Washington, Hartford 
O'Nan, Eugene. Route 3, Henderson, 7-9077, 6-9223 
Owens, Homer A., Jr., 508 Central Ave., Pikeville, GE 7-4051, 

(Bus. No.J 
Patton, John "B", 1419 McHenry, Louisville, ME 4-3828, 

JU 2-3511, Ext. 282 
Pearson, Bobby Neal, Beech Creek 

Peay, Curtis, Route 5, Bowling Green, Vi 3-8171, Vi 3-8171 
Peden, Harlan, 206 Garmon Ave., Glasgow 
Pernod. Joe B., 1203 Locust, Owensboro, MU 3-8773 
Perry, George, 506 River St., Dawson Springs, SW 7-2341 
Pridemore, Franklin D., Knox St., Barbourville, 268, 258 
Racel, David, Watterson Trail, Jeffersontown, AM 7-6791, 

Vi 3-8789, Bowling Green 
Rail, Eugene, 105 Reservoir Rd., Frankfort, Ca 7-2365, Ca 7-2231, 

Ext. 202 
Reding, Richard Keith, 513 East Broadway, Mayfield, 1164 
Reed, Charles R., 147 Walnut, Versailles, 605Y, 7-2231, Ext. 

436, Frankfort 
Reeves, Kenneth H., 5023 Poplar Level Rd., Louisville 19, 

WO 9-8229, (Bus. No.J 
Rexroat. Jerry L., 347 Linden Walk, Lexington, 2-3277 
Rickman, Murrel, Box 266, College Station, Murray 
Roberts, Donald G., 119 Mac Court, Harrodsburg, 1060, 229 
Robinson. Donald C, 116 Butler St., Frankfort, CA 3-3801, 

CA 3-3424 
Rollins, Gerald D., 507 New Garden Apts., Ft. Knox, Wi 2-2025 

5757 
Rose, Lee Hyden. 209 East Maxwell, Lexington, 2-4568 
Rothfuss, Richard, 37 Gregory Lane, Ft. Thomas, HI 1-9190 
Runyon. Tommy Dean, P. O. Box 181. Belfry, 3456, 1661 
Rush, Jim T., S. Main St., Tompkinsville, HUD 7-6541. 

HUD 7-5640 
Russell. William E.. Box 1264. Au.stin Peay State College, 
Clarksville. Tennessee. 4301 Cumberland City, Tenn. 
Mi 5-9718 Clarksville, Tenn. 
Rutledge, Marvin Lee, 846 Ivy, Frankfort, Capital 7-4347, 

72250, Ext. 2636, or 2526 
Rutledge, Pete, 501 N. 2nd Street, Murray 
Scale, John D., Box 34, Booneville, 32661. 32546 
Shelton, Robert, 515 Pelham, Maysville, LO 4-4031, LO 4-4087 
Shoop, Arnold C, Jr., USATCA, Ft. Knox, 3102, 2966 
Simpson, Paul Dean, North 9th Street, Williamsburg, 6453. 

6625 
Singleton, Vesper, Brodhead, 11, 19 

Smith, Darrell C. 100 Meadowlane, Nicholasville, 43166, 22776 
Snowden, Ken, 833 Hilltop Road, Danville, 2387, 708 
Spencer, Edward, P. O. Box 121, Booneville 

Stamper, Russell, Box 698, Eastern Ky. State College, Rich- 
mond, IN 4-2602 
Steely, Stanley E., South 11th, Williamsburg, 3641 
Stone, Robert, Apt. 9, College Courts, Barboui'ville 
Tate, Harold D., Route 6, Richmond, Ford 4303 
Taylor, Dennis, 1406 Hughes, Murray, 1730, 57-1978 
Thomas, James G., 1619 Oleanda Ct., Box 3, Louisville, EM 

3-0209, ME 7-8731 
Tolle, Charles W., 106 West Penn St., Cynthiana. 363-J, 1148 
Torian, Virgil, Jr., 11071/2 East First, Hopkinsville, TU 5-51B, 

TU 6-5457 
Trivette, John Bill, Pikeville 
Turner, Aaron P.. 207 Preston, Glasgow 
Ulsas, Charles F., 501 Rosewood Dr., Evansville, Indiana, 

Ha 3-4324, GR 6-6521 
Vandergriff, Gene, 1307 Park Ave.. Paducah, 6-6752, 2-2768 
Van Meter, Kaye Don, Bee Spring, LY 73676, LY 73606 
VanSant, William E., 101 Holaday Lane, Lakeside Park, S. 

Ft. Mitchell, Di 16087 
Van Winkle, Steve, 4601 Picadilly, Louisville 15, EM 67094 
Vipperman, Albert. Belfry. 2362 (Bus. No.) 
Waggoner, Philip, 2302 Kentucky Ave., Paducah 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1958 



Page Five 



Walker, Lawrence I., 5402 Bold Venture Rd., Valley Station. 

WE 7-3841, Ft. Knox 2832 
Walters, Jim, 38 South Oak St.. Hazard. North 340 
Warren. Shelby P.. 1657 Liberty Kd.. Lexington. 4-8283 
Watts, Earl W.. 223 Vet Village. Richmond. 2640-R 
Webb. Oren H.. Sweeden. LY 6-2157. 6-2151 
Weber. David. 3707 St. Germaine. Louisville 

Weddington. Herbert, 166 Sunset Dr.. Frankfort, 7-6704. 3-1616 
Weisbrodt. Paul E., 350 Stratford, Lexington, 7-3924, 7-3457 
Whitehouse, Donald Lee, 51-A Ailais Rd.. Hazard. 203. 506 
Whitehouse. William. Bradfordsville 
Williams, Donald, Route 2, Waltersville, 175-R, 106 
Williams, James H., 2428 Adams, Ashland, E 5-2733, E 4-8282 
Willis, Donald A.. Prestonsburg. Martin 3407 (Bus. No.) 
Wilson. Jack R.. 2220 Sharon Rd.. Ashland, EA 4-1234. 

EA 5-1611 
Wilson, Irvin. Belfry. Williamson 155-J, Stone 2362 
Wise. Jack. 363 N. Broadway, Lexington, 2-0731. 4-2431 
Woods. Clyde M., Box 47. Four Mile. ED 7-3458 
Wright. Ben H.. College Heights Post Office. Bowling Green 
Young. Bobby, Blue Diamond. 362 (Bus. No. I 
Youtsey. Norman. 215 Ridgeway Ave.. Southgate. Hi 1-2157 



The Average Kentucky Coach 

An interesting survey has been made by 
Coach Jimmie Feix of the Western Kentucky 
State College faculty. The survey resulte(i in 
a thesis which had the title, "The Average 
Kentucky High School Coach," and was sub- 
mitted as a partial fulfillment of the re- 
quirements for the M.A. degree. 

In stating the problem, Coach Feix said: 

"The primary objective of this study is to 
determine the average Kentucky high school 
coach. It is believed that if aspirants to this 
profession could better understand the posi- 
tion and characteristics of the Kentucky high 
school teacher-coach, they would be better 
able to evaluate their aptitudes and abilities 
for success in the position. 

"Armed with research data, persons with 
ambitions for teacher-coach positions can 
better select both curricular and extracurric- 
ular experiences for optimum preparation. 
Disillusionment of young teacher-coaches as 
they compare actual experiences and require- 
ments with classroom theory costs education 
innumerable qualified young leaders. If 
unreal aspirations and faulty estimations of 
the position can be eliminated, a higher per- 
centage of success is probable. 

"Further, it is desirable to have a compari- 
son between basketball coaches working in a 
school system able to finance and operate a 
companion football program with those 
basketball coaches in the smaller schools 
which support only basketball. The latter 
school is the type prevalent in Kentucky. 
This small school is also the place of first 
employment for better than seventy-five per 
cent of the graduating prospective coaches. 
A comparison is made of three types of 
coaches according to their athletic programs. 
(1) Head football coach; (2) Head basketball 
coach at the school having a football team; 
and (3) Head basketball coach employed in a 
school not playing football." 



Mr. Feix made numerous item comparisons 
after he had tabulated the results of the 
questionnaire which he sent out to Kentucky 
coaches. Some of the most interesting were 
under the headings of Athletic Background 
and Educational Background. They were as 
follows : 

"94.3% of the football coaches played high 
school football and 85.7% played college 
football. 100% of the basketball coaches at 
football schools played high school basket- 
ball and 83 So of these coaches played college 
basketball. 96.7'', of the basketball coaches 
at non-football playing schools played high 
school basketball while only 46.7 ',o played 
basketball in college. 

"100% of the football coaches hold a bache- 
lor's degree and 31.4'/'' hold a master's de- 
gree. 100/' of the basketball coaches at foot- 
ball schools hold a bachelor's degree and 50% 
of these coaches hold a master's degree. 90% 
of the basketball coaches at non-football 
playing schools hold a bachelor's degree and 
37' < of these coaches hold a master's degree. 
60 '/c of the football coaches have an under- 
graduate major in physical education while 
a total of 85.7'/' have some training in the 
undergraduate curriculum in physical edu- 
cation. 62.5 '/f> of the basketball coaches at 
football schools have undergraduate majors 
in physical education while 83 ' < have formal 
training in physical education as an under- 
graduate. 56.7'% of the basketball coaches 
at non-football playing schools have had 
training through a major in physical educa- 
tion while undergraduates; a total of 83.3% 
have had physical education during their 
undergraduate study." 

Coach Feix, in summarizing his results in 
accordance with the information which the 
coaches had provided, concluded that the 
"average" Kentucky high school coach : 

1. played the sport in both high school 
and college of which he is now coach ; 

2. has a bachelor's degree ; 

3. majored in physical education in college 
or university work; 

4. is in the classroom 4.3 hours daily in- 
cluding homeroom and/or study halls; 

5. is teaching in two different subject 
matter fields ; 

6. has extracurricular responsibilities in 
addition to his coaching duties. Sponsor of 
letterman's club, class sponsor, and sponsor 
of a particular subject matter club (i.e. Eng- 
lish Club, Industrial Arts Club, etc.) in that 
order, are the three most frequent responsi- 
bilities ; 

(Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1958 



The Flying Dutchman 

Handsome Jim Pursifull, principal of Bell 
County High, is the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor 
winner for the month of November. A few 
years ago Jim started the practice of mak- 
ing the basketball clinics in his mountain 
habitat at Pineville social affairs. The prac- 
tice has spread across the mountains, 
through the Bluegrass and into the Penny- 
rile. 

With his unselfish aim of providing a 
pleasant evening both socially and basket- 
ball-wise, the popular fellow set up huge 
tables loaded with all kinds of sandwiches, 
cookies and other snacks. Coffee and soft 
drinks are plentiful and the fellows refresh 
themselves in the middle of the clinic when 
a coffee break is held. Because of his unsel- 
fish pioneering service, many clinics now 
have become fine social affairs making for 
a good spirit between coaches and officials. 
A Corn Cob Pipe is now on its way to the 
land of the mountain laurels and Jimmy 
Pursifull. 

Leland Rubarts of Dunnville has done 
it again. In last month's article we told you 
that he would miss his first clinic because 
duty called him to the Postmasters Conven- 
tion at Miami Beach. Leland's record, how- 
ever, remains perfect. The enthusiastic fel- 
low passed up glamorous Miami Beach to 
keep his clinic attendance intact as he ans- 
wered the roll call in Somerset. 

Compliments on K.H.S.A.A. clinics con- 
tinue to come in. Most gratifying is one from 
Lafayette, Indiana. Jack Small says the 
clinics are most valuable and that he recom- 
mends that the National Basketball Rules 
Committee consider the officiating viewpoint 
when new rules are written. 

Colonel Bob Hinshaw, Assistant Commis- 
sioner of the Indiana High School Athletic 
Association, has asked the Dutchman to set 
aside September 26 of next year to conduct 
the state-wide Indiana clinic at Indianapolis 
for the fifth consecutive year. Bob and Com- 
missioner Phillips make their clinic a social 
affair just like Jim Pursifull does at Bell 
County High. 

Other clinics are developing from the of- 
ficials clinics — and this is a good sign for 
ba.sketball. 

Dick Hyland of the Scioto Valley Officials 
Association informs the Dutchman that a 
state-wide basketball workshop is being held 
in South Eastern Ohio and that he is charged 
with developing the relationship of timers, 




Leland Rubarts 

and scorers to officials. More clinics for tim- 
ers and scorers are highly desirable. Our 
best wishes go to Dick. 

Paul Perdue, widely recognized for his 
leadership in the field of education in Trigg 
County, is scheduled for a discussion of the 
parts cheerleaders play in athletic contests. 
This meeting scheduled in November at Mur- 
ray State College deals with the cheerleaders 
place in school athletics and how they affect 
school spirit and sportsmanship. This is an- 
other clinic which will do much toward mak- 
ing athletics cleaner and finer. 

All over coaches and officials continually 
prove that Kentucky is a friendly state. 
Everywhere on our clinic trip we had invita- 
tions to dine. Ashland's George Conley want- 
ed to take us home with him, Kean Jenkins 
and Howard Gardner bought Joe Billy and 
me steaks at the Elizabethtown Country 
Club, Roy Settle had a dinner invitation wait- 
ing at Owensboro and so it went all over 
Kentucky. You just have to warm up to 
Kentucky's athletic leaders. 

Ralph Mussman, Newport, and Claude 
Ricketts, Valley Station, are out getting 
votes. Ralph, who has handled the state 
tournament on a number of occasions, will 
be candidate for the high office of mayor of 
Newport when the next election rolls around. 
Claude, an outstanding basketball official of 
the Louisville area, is currently making the 
race for membership on the Jefferson County 
Boai'd of Education. 

Here is good news for every Kentuckian! 
Ernie Chattin, one of the most highly re- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1958 



Page Seven 



spected and loved men of Eastern Kentucky, 
is rapidly on the mend in his Ashland home 
following a hard siege of illness which caused 
him to miss his first basketball clinic since 
1940. The fellows made up a "Jackpot" to buy 
Ernie a gift to let him know he was being 
missed. Jim Baker paid high tribute to the 
work Ernie has done in Eastern Kentucky 
placing sports on a high level. 

Two recommendations have now come in 
for the Game Guy Award. One is for Dick 
Coop, Campbellsville, who has overcome polio 
to become a topnotch basketball player and 
a lad who presents an example which every 
youngster of the Commonwealth would do 
Well to follow. His Dad and Mother, Paul and 
Sara, could qualify as State Champion par- 
ents. The other comes from the mountains 
nominating Claude Russell of Cordia High 
School. Claude is overcoming a physical 
handicap suffered while fishing at the tender 
age of five years. A fall on a broken fruit jar 
caused this youngster to have two stiff fing- 
ers but he does not allow them to stop his 
sports activities. The Dutchman's salute goes 
to both of these fighters. 

Here is something different! At Hazard, 
Arnett Strong claims that Coach Goebel Rit- 
ter can drive a golf ball as far with a 5 iron 
as the Dutchman can with his number 1 
wood. Goebel has a challenge for October of 
next year when the Dutchman will bring 
his number 1 wood to Hazard to settle this 
controversy on the 1959 clinic trip. 

Foster "Sid" Meade, popular educator of 
South Portsmouth, Kentucky, has long been 
heralded as one of the state's most efficient 
basketball officials. With this the Dutchman 
heartily agrees. There are few who know 
when to blow the whistle as instinctively as 
"Debonair Sid." At Ashland the fellows were 
commenting on Sid's rare judgment, and we 
asked what caused him to be a standout. A 
keynote was sounded as one said Sid is not 
a technical official. In fact his words were 
"There is not a technical bone in Sid's head." 

The Flying Dutchman is a collector of 
poems which have a moral for young men. 
The one with which he closes his column 
this month is contributed by official Ben 
Edelen. 

PRESSURE 

How do you act when the pressure is on? 
When the chances of victory are almost gone. 
When fortune's sun has refused to shine. 
And you haven't done much for a long, long 

time. 
How do you act when the going is rough, 




Sid Meade 

Does your spirit sag when the breaks are 

tough ? 
Or is there within you a spark that glows 
Brighter, as fiercer the battle grows? 

How long, how hard will you fight the foe? 
That's what the world would like to know. 
Cowards can fight when they're out ahead. 
But the uphill grind makes the thoroughbred. 

You crave for success, then tell me son. 
How do you act when the pressure is on? 



Clinic for Cheerleaders 

On Saturday, November 15, the eighth an- 
nual Cheerleaders Clinic and Youth Day will 
be held at the University of Kentucky. Spon- 
sored by the State YMCA of Kentucky and 
built around the theme of Clean Sportsman- 
ship, this program has become one of the 
largest student attended activities in the 
state, as well as being one of the most worth- 
while, regarding clean sportsmanship in high 
school athletics. 

There are separate sessions and activities 
for cheerleaders, majorettes, and other high 
school students. In these sessions, the stu- 
dents learn the principles of sportsmanship 
promoted between the spectators in the 
stands and the players on the field or court. 
In the cheerleaders section there will be 
shown examples of the best type cheering, 
principles and purposes of cheerleading, and 
competitive cheering between the schools 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1958 



represented. In the majorettes session, prin- 
ciples of field showmanship and baton twirl- 
ing exhibitions will be given. All other high 
school students who attend will meet in 
Memorial Coliseum for a very worthwhile 
and interesting (as well as entertaining) 
program. The afternoon activities include 
the football game between the University of 
Kentucky and Xavier University. 

On the same day there will be a similar 
Clinic and Youth Day program held at Wes- 
tern State College, Bowling Green, Kentucky 
for the high school students in the western 
and mid-western section of the state who, 
because of distance, cannot attend the Lex- 
ington Clinic. 

High school principals will receive (or 
have already received) further information 
on these very fine and beneficial Clinics. 



SEC Regulations 

Commissioner Bernie Moore of the South- 
eastern Conference has sent to the K.H.S. 
A.A. office a memorandum concerning SEC 
and NCAA recruiting rules and interpre- 
tations. Since much of the information given 
will be of interest to high school administra- 
tors, coaches, and players, the memorandum 
is being printed in its entirety. 

MEMORANDUM 
TO: SEC INSTITUTES 

In view of NCAA Official Interpretations 
of the recruiting rules issued since my 
Memorandum of August 30, 1957, this 
Memorandum is to supplant the previous one. 

I. An institution may provide or pay trans- 
portation cost of a prospective student-ath- 
lete for one and only one visit to its campus. 

II. An institution may provide lodging 
and reasonable entertainment to a prospect, 
his parents or friends on as many visits to 
campus as it desires. Entertainment must 
be on the institution's under-graduate camp- 
us or its immediate environs which are de- 
fined as the immediate hometown area of 
the institution. 

III. No pooled funds administered by an 
outside agency can be used for any phase 
of recruiting-transportation, entertainment 
or otherwise, except entertainment as set 
forth in Interpretation 9. 

IV. Any person (individual) at his own ex- 
pense may transport or pay the transporta- 
tion costs of a prospective student-athlete to 
visit the campus. 

The following interpretations conform 
with NCAA Interpretations: 



1. All funds collected for the recruiting 
(including transporting and entertaining) of 
prospective student-athletes shall be deposit- 
ed with the member institution. The institu- 
tion is exclusively and entirely responsible 
for the manner in which these funds are 
expended. 

2. The one and only one visit for which the 
institution is allowed to finance the trans- 
portation costs must be to the under-grad- 
uate campus and not to any other site. 

3. Necessary meals enroute may be in- 
cluded in "actual round trip transportation 
costs." 

4. When trip to campus is made in personal 
automobile the institution may pay same 
mileage rate as is allowed by the institution 
to its own personnel. Friends or relatives 
can ride along in same automobile. (This does 
not mean that separate transportation can 
be furnished friends or relatives) . 

5. The two day and two night limit means 
48 hours on the campus. 

6. If trip to campus is made in automobile 
of a friend the prospect or friend is entitled 
to reimbursement for mileage (Not both). 

7. If more than one prospect makes trip in 
one automobile, reimbursement for mileage 
by the institution can be made to only one 
person (prospect or friend) but will count as 
the one paid visit for all of the prospects. 

8. The institution may provide lodging 
and reasonable entertainment on the campus 
for a friend or the parents of a prospective 
student-athlete regardless of whether the 
prospect is along and regardless of how the 
friend or parents made the trip. 

9. No outside organization, agency or group 
of individuals (booster clubs, quarterback or 
touchdown clubs, alumni groups, etc.) are 
permitted to utilize, administer or expend 
funds for the recruiting of prospective stu- 
dent-athletes, including transporting, enter- 
taining and gifts or services to prospective 
student-athletes or their relatives and 
friends. The pooling of resources for such 
purposes by two or more persons shall con- 
stitute such a fund (This does not prohibit 
bona fide alumni organizations of an insti- 
tution from sponsoring luncheons or dinners 
at which prospective students, both athletes 
and non-athletes, of that immediate locale 
are invited as guests). 

If a company's funds are used to pay the 
expenses incurred in transporting a pros- 
pective student-athlete to the campus, then 
this constitutes the use of pooled resources. 

A. Any person (individual) at his own ex- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1958 



Page Nine 



pense may transport or pay transportation 
costs of a prospective student-athlete to the 
institution's under-graduate campus as many 
times as he desires. 

B. Any person (individual) at his own ex- 
pense may transport or pay transportation 
costs of a prospect's girl friend or relative 
of prospect to the institution's campus. 

C. Any person (individual) at his own ex- 
pense may NOT furnish transportation to a 
prospect to any site other than the institu- 
tion's under-graduate campus for purposes 
of entertainment. To see a football game has 
been ruled as entertainment. However, a 
prospect may be given a ticket to the game 
provided he furnishes his own transporta- 
tion, meals and lodging. 

10. Entertainment (meals and/or lodging) 
cannot be furnished to prospective student- 
athlete, his relatives or friends, by an insti- 
tution or its alumni and friends at any site 
other than the institution's under-graduate 
campus and its immediate environs or the 
prospect's hometown area. 

11. Any trip or entertainment for the pur- 
pose of or that can be construed as "hiding" 
a prospect from representatives of another 
institution will be ruled a violation of the 
spirit of the SEC rules and the prospect will 
be prohibited from signing with that insti- 
tution. 

12. A prospective student-athlete may be 
visited or contacted at his high school only 
after obtaining permission for such visit 
from the high school principal or his author- 
ized representative. 

13. The traveling expenses of a prospec- 
tive student-athlete for any purpose shall not 
be furnished by a member institution or by 
anyone other than those on whom he is leg- 
ally dependent prior to the last day of classes 
of his junior year in high school. This does 
not prohibit an institution from furnishing 
meals and lodging on the campus or its im- 
mediate environs if traveling expenses are 
furnished by his parents. 

You will note that these Interpretations 
prohibit a practice that heretofore has been 
engaged in by some of our institutions, i.e., 
having alumni or friends furnish transporta- 
tion to sites other than the campus and either 
the institution or alumni furnishing meals 
and lodging especially where "home" games 
are played off the campus. 

It is suggested that all members of your 
athletic staff acquaint and familiarize them- 
selves with the contents of this Memoran- 
dum and that interested alumni and friends 



be informed as to what they may do and 
may not do in recruiting under the NCAA 
and SEC rules. — Bernie Moore, Commis- 
sioner, Southeastern Conference. 



THE AVERAGE KENTUCKY COACH 

(Continued from Page Five) 

7. coaches 2.5 different sports during the 
school year either as head or assistant coach ; 

8. is a head coach of a spring sport, (base- 
ball, tennis, track, golf, etc.) ; 

9. is 34 years old ; 

10. began coaching at 24 years of age; 

11. has been in the coaching profession 
9.1 years; 

12. has been in his present school system 
6.4 years; 

13. has coached in one other school system 
prior to his present position; 

14. belongs to the National Education As- 
sociation, the Kentucky Education Associa- 
tion, and the Kentucky High School Coaches' 
Association ; 

15. reads the Scholastic Coach and the 
Kentucky Education Association Journal; 

16. is married and has 2 children. 



BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 

when the Official, under the mistalven notion that it 
is a held ball, blows his whistle. Whose ball and 
where ? 

Ruling: Ball belongs to A for a throw-in at mid- 
court. The ball has become dead in control of team A. 

13. Play: Al is in the act of throwing for goal 
when he is pushed by Bl. The throwing motion is 
continued and the ball goes through the basket. 
After the ball is in flight, Al comes down on the 
back of B2. 

Ruling: Assuming the contact with B2 occurs be- 
fore the ball becomes dead because of going through 
the basket, this is a false double foul. Al should 
be awarded one free throw after which B2 is award- 
ed a bonus penalty (or one free throw if the bonus 
rule is not in effect). After the last free throw, 
center jump. 

14. Play: After an acknowledged timing error 
which occurs near the end of a period, home Timer 
says 16 seconds remain and visiting Timer contends 
10 seconds remain. 

Ruling: If impossible for Timers to agree, Referee 
will estimate remaining time and either have clock 
set accordingly or personally count out the remain- 
ing seconds. 

15. Play: Bl pushes Al while Al is trying for field 
goal. A2 interferes with the ball on the ring or in 
the cylinder. 

Ruling: The violation by A2 kills the ball. There- 
fore, it is an unsuccessful try and Al is awarded two 
free throws. This is one of the few situations where 
a foul and a violation occur during the same live 
ball. 

16. Play: Al enters the court without reporting 
to the Scorer. If this is done following a foul and 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1958 



before the free throw, what constitutes the "second 
live ball"? 

Ruling: When the ball is handed to the free 
thrower, it becomes alive. This is the first live ball. 
If he is awarded only one throw and the throw is 
successful, the second live ball occurs when the 
throw-in touches a player in the court. If a second 
free throw is awarded, the second live ball occurs 
when the ball is handed to the free thrower for the 
second throw. If the first free throw should not 
be successful and the ball goes in play by a rebound, 
the second live ball occurs after the ball has become 
dead for any reason and it then a'jain becomes alive 
by a .lump ball or another free throw or when the 
throw-in touches a player in the court. 

17. Play: Team A uses 3 charged time-outs dur- 
ing the game which ends in a tie. How many time- 
outs may they have in the first extra period with- 
out a penalty for a technical foul? 

Ruling: Unused time-outs are accumulative. Since 
team A used only three du'-ing the regular playing 
period, it would be entitled to three during the first 
time-out and one additional for each succeeding 
extra period. 

18. Play: Dribbler Al is advancing the ball and 
being closely trailed by Bl. Al stops suddenly and 
Bl runs or charges into him. 

Ruling: Foul by Bl. 

19. Play: What are the points of measurement 
in determining whether or not the player in control 
is closely guarded? 

Ruling: Measurement is from the forward foot 
of the offensive pla.ver to the forward foot of the 
defensive player. Because the rule specifies "not 
exceeding- six feet," Officials should be as certain 
as possible that the guard is within the required 
distance. 

20. Play: After jump at center, A2 catches tap 
which he passes to A3, who slaps it back to A2. 
A2 dribbles to back court. 

Ruling: Violation. A2 cannot return ball to back 
court following a jump at center after he has once 
lo&t player control. 

21. Play: After jump at: (a) center; or (b) free 
throw circle of A. the tapped ball is first touched 
(but not controlled) by A2, after which A3 
taps the ball. A2 then secures possession and causes 
ball to go to back court by passing or dribbling. 

Ruling: Legal in (a) unless tap by A3 was con- 
trolled. Violation in (b) if touched in back court by 
a teammate. The exception in 9-9 does not apply 
unless the jump is at center. 

22. Play: After teams have been warned due to 
lack of action and with team A responsible, Al holds 
ball in mid-court area. Bl positions himself definite- 
ly within mid-court area but exceeding 6 feet from 
Al. 

Ruling: If Bl chooses to have lack of action pro- 
vision apply he must not remain in mid-court area. 
Bl could attempt to secure a held ball by taking 
a guarding position "not exceeding 6 feet" from Al. 

23. Play: During dead ball caused by A3 fouling 
Bl, but before second live ball following the error, 
it is discovered Al did not receive a deserved bonus 
throw. 

Ruling: This is not a false double foul. Al is per- 
mitted free throw after which ball becomes dead. 
During free throw by Al, plavers may not line up 
along free throw lane. After free throw or throws 
by Bl, the ball remains or becomes alive in usual 
manner. 



24. Play: (a) Before; or (b) after ball has left 
hands of Al for free throw. Official notices 1st 
alley is not occupied. 

Ruling: In (a). Official will order Bl into alley 
before permitting Al to attempt free thi-ow. Tech- 
nical foul could be assessed if B fails to carry out 
Official's order. No penalty in (b) and play pro- 
ceeds. 

25. Play: Al erroneously attempts field goal at 
B's basket and there is basket interference: (a) by 
Bl; or (b) by A2. 

Ruling: In (a), the violation kills ball, no points 
are awarded and throw-in from spot nearest the 
violation is by A. In (b), 2 points are credited to 
B and throw-in is by A, as if a goal had been scored. 

26. Play: After lack of action warning, both 
teams contribute to an action-packed contest. 
Later, with A responsible for action, B takes a 
deep zone defense. Al holds the ball in mid-court 
area while his teammates pause to recover their 
breath or while they position themselves to attack 
the zone. 

Ruling: If, since the warning, there has been 
ample action and it is reasonably certain A is not 
attempting- to prevent more than one try during 
remainder of the period. Official will not be hurried 
in beginning his silent 5 seconHs count. However, 
when he has allowed a few seconds for player re- 
covery. Official will begin "applying the lack of 
action" count. 

27. Play: During free throw by Al, if Bl is in the 
lane too soon, the violation does not immediately 
kill the ball. But if Bl touches the ball while it 
touches the basket cylinder, the violation kills the 
ball immediately. What is the reason for this dif- 
ference ? 

Ruling: If the free thro-vv violation by B caused the 
ball to become dead immediately, it would be pos- 
sible for B to co'.nmit repeated violations without 
additional penalty. It could be impossible for A to 
score. The violation might be repeated at length. 
In the case of basket interference, there is no 
opportunity for B to repeat the infraction. Since the 
penalty is the awarding of one point, there is no 
possibility of B gaining an advantage by the viola- 
tion. 

28. Play: Ball is legally tapped during jump ball 
between Al and Bl. This is followed by second tap 
by Al, after which Al catches the ball or taps it a 
third time. 

Ruling: Violation. The clock which started with 
the legal tap should be permitted to run unless, 
following the violation, there is some unusual delay 
such as the ball rolling a considerable distance 
from the throw-in spot. 

29. Play: Al is permitted an unmerited free throw 
which is successful. The error is discovered after 
there have been three or more live balls following 
the successful attempt. 

Ruling: The point scored by Al counts and the 
error is ignored. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1958 



Page Eleven 



NATIONAL SECRETARY RETIRES 

(Continued from Oct. Issue— THE ATHLETE) 

This article would not be complete with- 
out the inclusion of some statements made 
by Mr. Porter in a recent brochure. Excerpts 
follow : 

"THE AUTHOR of this unnecessary and 
possibly pointless reminiscence has, over the 
years, been guilty of philosophizing in rhyme 
and rhythm and in sculpturing with words. 
A few of the results may fit this occasion of 
the valedictorian (with only one in the class) 
leaving the home cave and traveling over the 
mountain to the valley of retirement. The 
few notes of nostalgia, like colorful flecks 
in polished marble, merely highlight and ac- 
centuate the anticipation of what may pre- 
sent itself to the sculptor as he unofficially 
continues to chip away the shell to reveal 
fundamental principles, facts or forms which 
may give satisfaction to those who behold 
and understand. 

"In the Cosmic Plan, the ego of man 
Is lost when he starts to dream 

Of work or play where he battles away 
And lives for the good of the team. 

"The altruist's goal, the good of the whole 

Is not a Utopian dream 
He lives the best, who contributes most 

To the welfare of the team. 

"HIGHLIGHTS OF THE ERA, with in- 
tangible and tangible results, could fill a 
historical volume. Only a few can be listed 
here. It has been a privilege to have been on 
the team while the Federation membership 
has grown from 26 State Associations to 47 
plus the District of Columbia, Alaska, Ha- 
waii and four Canadian Provinces. Even as 
late as 1940, California, Delaware, Kentucky, 
Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, 
New Jersey, North Carolina. Rhode Island, 
South Carolina, Vermont and Virginia had 
not become members. The delay of Texas in 
joining forces with the other 21,000 high 
schools has prevented a perfect score but now 
that Large Brother Alaska wears his big 
britches becomingly, the stars may augur 
well. It has been a pleasure to witness the 
growth of member State Associations in in- 
fluence, economic status and volume of serv- 
ice. From five full-time State Executives in 
1929 to nine in 1940 and then to the present 
fifty-five (including Assistant Executives) 
is a long step. From state-wide budgets of 
approximately $6,000 per year to those of 



$200,000 is a monumental jump. From annual 
salaries for Executives as late as 1940, when 
the top State Association salary was $6,500 
and the top Federation salary was $4,500 to 
current schedules up to $16,000 is a signifi- 
cant increase which outstrips inflationary 
trends during the period. Corresponding 
growth of efficient office staffs has oc- 
curred. State Association reserves have in- 
creased from a few thousand dollars to a na- 
tion-wide total of more than a million to in- 
sure a high degree of stability. Precedent- 
setting court cases have established the legal 
standing of member Associations and the 
right of schools to combine and operate as 
a unit in matters of mutual interest. These 
few of the many momentous developments 
illustrate the efforts which have ministered 
to the welfare of all school populations. 
Planned programs have built respect for the 
school athletic department. The end result 
is opportunity for hundreds of thousands to 
engage in wholesome competition and for 
tens of millions to enjoy, throughout life, 
the satisfactions which derive from a de- 
gree of intelligent understanding of the 
skills, strategies and artistry involved in this 
constantly growing facet in lives lived in a 
time of increased leisure and range of inter- 
ests and decreased stresses attending mar- 
ginal earnings for survival. 

"ON THE NATIONAL SCALE the era 
marks a corresponding growth. The Na- 
tional Federation ha^j been strong as its mem- 
ber Associations have been strong. Any bol- 
stering of the strength and prestige of a 
member has automatically engendered self 
strength. Credit for accomplishment in any 
project has been ample for sharing between 
the involved member, each other member 
and the Federation as a whole. The sole justi- 
fication for the existence of a State Associa- 
tion is its service to its member high schools 
and the only reason for having a National 
Federation is its service to its member As- 
sociations. A service organization does not 
exist for providing livelihood and comfort 
for its officers. Rather, its officers exist for 
the benefit of the members to whose serv- 
ices the administrative machinery is dedi- 
cated. The highest degree of satisfaction 
and the greatest intensity of effort come 
from undivided and unswerving attention to 
such service. Any diverting of attention to 
other personal considerations bring only 
ephemeral and, often, weakening elation. 

"IT HAS BEEN A RARE PRIVILEGE to 
have made some little contribution to: the 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1958 



orderly machinery through which the high 
school athletic acti\ities have been kept on 
an even keel and guided around besetting 
dangers of uncontrolled bigness, solicitation 
and encroaching pressures ; the crystallizing 
of mass thinking and expression into a form 
of practical use; the adaptation of athletic 
equipment and playing rules to fit school 
needs ; the discovery of the great need for 
analysis and organization in the plaving 
rules of football, basketball, b^tspball, soccer, 
six-man football and track and the codifying 
of these into a logical form suitable for use 
in training programs and sports administra- 
tion courses; the setting up of machinery 
for a democratic and efficient method of 
making, teaching and administerinsr the 
rules ; the development of a football and 
basketball in a size to fit the hands of hierh 
school players; the initiation of a program 
of pattern-cuttinor. trial use. and tradition 
dissolving, decade-lone, introduction of the 
molded-type basketball whose present uni- 
versal use revolutionized the method of mak- 
ing ba.sketballs and other balls; t>ie desisrn- 
ine. experimentiner with and 'popularizing of 
the fan-shaped backbo'ird whose economic, 
artistic, congestion relieving and improved 
nlaying benefits have been amplv proven; 
The development of sanction machinerv for 
the easy processing of interstate contests: 
the inauguration and erowth in nrestife of 
the National Federation Press: the phenom- 
enal multinlicatinn of Federation "iiblications 
from a distribution of 2800 co'">ies to a cii'- 
culation of three-fourths of a million ner 
year, involving 19 publications. 87 million 
printed pa<?es and such that thp 4 millionth 
»nd 6 millionth conv of the football and 
basketball publications, respeftivelv, have 
come from the press : the creation of a Fed- 
eration financial structure which is not 
burdensome to members, based on a modest 
surplus fund investment of $2900 in 1940 and 
now grown to its current value of about 
8185,000; the devising and putting into ef- 
fect of a retirement plan whereby all full- 
time Federation employees share equally in 
benefits of a system tailored to a eroup with 
a small number of employees and built on a 
basic contribution of $5000 for each of the 
three employees then working, and since, 
grown by accumulation of security gains and 
modest contributions to about $105.000 ; the 
production and assembly, through adaptation 
and creation, of a wealth of school athletic 
literature of a stature to command respect; 
the designing and traditionalizing of the 



symbolic Federation seal and of fundament- 
als charts for rules analysis ; the forming of 
joint committees and of the National Alli- 
ance; the supervising of a unique and inter- 
nationally recognized sports film program; 
the creation of a Joint Baseball Agreement 
and subsidy fund which has given life to 
this program ; the elimination of an ill-con- 
ceived $10,000 tax on school event admis- 
sions; and the establishment of the State As- 
sociation and National Federation offices as 
the clearing house for activities formerly 
dominated by non-school groups. 

"SECURE IN THE KNOWLEDGE that all 
of these things are so, and happy in the cer- 
tainty that, under guidance of a competent 
new administrative officer, a loyal exper- 
ienced and efficient office staff and Execu- 
tive Committee ; and a fortunate blend of 
veteran and enthusiastic younger State As- 
sociation Executives and Board of Control 
members ; your long-time quarterback and 
co-worker is content to : wipe dry his editorial 
nuill; hand up his whistle and participation 
shoes ; snap off the light on the lectern ; 
place the scepter of anthoritv in rules analy- 
sis, organization and interpretation on the 
table top of the iuridical b«r; and remove his 
tasseled mortarboard symbol of the oppor- 
tunity to analyze, crystallize, adapt and func- 
tionalize the wealth of thought, expression 
and action that has emanated from each of 
the participants in the national orcanization. 
It is a time for a finishing and a time for a 
beginning. 

"Administering a national organization is 
a relay with no finish line. The running of 
the first leg is important onlv as it affects 
the remainder of the race. The running of 
the next leg is of paramount interest and 
there is every reason to believe that its run- 
ning will be just as interesting and effective 
as that which preceded the exchanging of 
the baton. That all of those who so loyally 
supported and contributed to the efforts of 
starter in the race, will transfer their loyal- 
ties, their supporting strensrths and their 
offered talents to Executive Secretary-Elect, 
Clifford B. Fagan, currently your anchor 
man, is the sincere desire of your National 
Federation Executive Secretary Emeritus, 
Henry Van Arsdale Porter." 



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1 



Trinity's State Championship Cross Country Team 





(Left to Right) Front Row: Baker, W. Cunningham, J. Bealmer, R. Bealmer. Second Row: 
Father Eimer, Assistant Coach; Moll, Larkin, Captain Owens, J. Cunningham, Coach Denny. 

For the second straight year, the team representing the Trinity High School of Louis- 
ville won the K.H.S.A.A. State Cross Country Run. The meet was held in Lexington on 
November 15. The same group placed first in the high school division of the Shamrock Run, 
held in Louisville on Thanksgiving Day. 



Ofticial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN 

DECEMBER - 1358 



E. MAIN ST. (LYNCH)— CUMBERLAND VALLEY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Riuhti Front Row: Hoiska. Jackson. Evans. Burnette, C. Brewer, Hagy. Molley, Melvin Beokler. C. 
Florek, Blondell. Oakley, Dizney. Second Row: Coach Riley, Ass't Coach Miracle, Mayerchak, Jenkins, McGeorge. 
Mann, T. Owens. Yarbrough. HoUin. Mitchell Beckler, R. Blevins. Griffith. Haley, Ass't Coach Collins. Ass't Coach 
Bonich. Third Row: Blevins, Shotton, Watts, Greer, Powell, Webb, B. Brewer, Hillen, Marion. Fourth Row: 
Woods, Cress, R, Florek, Flanary, J. Owens, Thomalison. Not in Picture: D. Evans, L. Flanary, D. Sconce. 
Seated in Front: Mgrs. McCarthy, Letanosky. 



CORBIN— SOUTHEASTERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




'a^m^^tksA:^i^^^MrdM^J^A 



(Left to Right) Front Row: B. Bird, Hamblin, Dallas Hart. Barton. Myers, Miller, Boone. Hutson, Wyatt, 
Turrentine. Terrell. -Second Row: White, Duane Hart, Hodge, Grant, Ohler, Short, Bible, Lynch, Hinderlight. R. 
Bird, Rader. -Third Row: Morgan, Croley, Brooks, Hounschell, Hammons, Rowlett, Taylor, Runager, Ramey, 
Morisson, New, Gibbs. 



PERRYVILLE— BLUEGRASS EIGHT-MAN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




** ^',:»^h^» -.**!, ifi^^pt*;*: ^(i*r* % 



(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Raymond, Dunsmore, Webb, Glasscock, Warren, Yankey, Hillard, Mgr, 
Baker. Second Row : Ass't Coach Gentry, Sweazey, Milburn, Jackson, Engle, Hundley, Bricken, Logue, Reynolds, 
Coach Mills. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ'' of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXI— NO. 5 



DECEMBER, 1958 



.00 Per Year 



Early Season Basketball Questions — Installment 2 

dribble ended when Al caught the ball with 
his right hand. In (b) the air dribble is the 
first part of a continuing dribble. 

36. Play. Al tosses ball over the head of 
Bl and (a) he touches it in flight to bat it 
to the floor or; (b) he allows the tossed ball 
to strike the floor and then continues his 
dribble. Ruling: Legal in both (a) and (b). 
In (a), there has been an air dribble. 

37. Play: Al, jumping in the center circle, 
taps ball to his front court where A2 slaps 
ball to A3, who dribbles to the back court. 
Ruling: Violation. Only the first person to 
touch the tapped ball may cause it to be 
returned to the back court. In this situation, 
that player was A2. 

38. Play: Does Rule 9-9 permit the first 
player to touch a jumn ball from center circle 
to either pass or dribble the ball to the back 
court without danger of penalty? Ruling: 
Yes, the first player to touch such .jump ball 
may either pass or dribble ("cause") the 
ball to his back court. 

39. Play: Al and B2 jump in A's free 
throw circle. Al tans the ball to A3 in front 
court who passes the ball to A5 in team A's 
back court. Ruling: Violation. The exception 
in Rule 9-9 does not apply to a jump at a 
free throw circle. 

40. Play: During jump ball at A's free 
throw line, the ball is tapped to A4 in his 
back court by: (a) jumper Al or non-jumper 
A2; or (b) non-jumper A3, who taps it to 
the back court during his dribble and after 
he was the first to touch the jumn ball. Rul- 
ing : In (a) it is not a violation unless, in the 
case of non-jumper A2, it is a controlled tap 
rather than attemot to bat the jumn ball to 
a location where it can be controlled. The 
legal taps of the jumper are never considered 
control. In (b) it is a violation. 

41. Play: During free throw by Al, if Bl 
is in the lane too soon, the violation does not 
immediately kill the ball. But if Bl touches 
the ball while it touches the basket cylinder, 
the violation kills the ball immediately. 
What is the reason for this difference? Rul- 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or modify any 
rale. They are interpretations on some of the early season 
situations which haye been presented. 

30. Play: Dribbler Al comes to a legal 
stop with the ball in both hands. Without 
moving his pivot foot, he leans over to touch 
the ball to the floor one or more times. He 
then straightens up and lifts pivot foot while 
throwing for goal. Ruling: Legal. There is 
nothing in this action to indicate it is illegal. 
A player who is holding the ball may touch 
it to the floor any number of times while 
holding his feet in place. Such action is not 
considered a dribble. 

31. Play: In breaking up opponent's pass, 
A-1 bats ball to floor: (a) directly in front 
of him ; or (b) several feet away. Before any 
other player touches the ball, Al uses both 
hands to secure possession. May Al dribble ? 
Ruling: Yes. 

32. Play: After muffing pass which 
strikes floor, Al picks up ball, using both 
hands. May he dribble? Ruling: Yes. 

33. Play: Clearly after the ball has left 
the hand of Al on a try, Bl pushes Al. 
Ruling: Common foul unless the push by Bl 
is flagrant, intentional or a part of a double 
or multiple foul. This is not a foul against a 
field goal thrower. There is continuous mo- 
tion only when the foul occurs by an oppon- 
ent of the thrower before the ball is in flight. 

34. Play: In the 4th quarter, team A is 
granted its 6th time-out at the expense of 
a technical foul. The game ends in a tie and 
Al is granted : (a) a 7th time-out in the first 
extra period or ; (b) its 7th and 8th time-out 
in the second extra period. Ruling: Legal in 
both (a) and (b). Each team is entitled to 
at least one time-out without penalty in each 
extra period and unused time-outs accumu- 
late and may be used at any time. Excess 
time-outs may be "bought" at the expense 
of a technical foul for each. 

35. Play : After holding the ball in his left 
hand, Al tosses it to his right hand where 
it: (a) comes to rest or; (b) is slapped to 
the floor and Al continues the dribble. Rul- 
ing: Action in (a) is an air dribble and the 



(Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1958 



DECEMBER, 1958 VOL XXI— NO. 5 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60). Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield {1957-61), Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones. (1957-61) Somerset: W. H. Crowdus 
(1958-62) Franklin; Jack Dawson (1958-62), Louisville; Robert 
P. Forsythe (1955-59), Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie (1955-59), 
Georgetown: Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60). Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 

Jrom the Commissionei s Cjjjice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1958 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



Delegate Assembly Members 

Members to the Delegate Assembly at the 
forthcoming 1959 annual meeting of the 
Association were elected by the principals 
of K.H.S.A.A. member schools on ballots 
returned to the State Office before Novem- 
ber 15. There were several ties in the voting 
for delegate and alternate. These ties were 
broken recently, with the delegates or alter- 
nates involved being determined by lot. The 
names of the district representatives are as 
follows : 

Delegates 

(1) Orville J. Mitchell, (2) Robert G. 
Fiser, (3) Cecil Reid, (4) Joe P. Duke. (5) 
Fred Clavton, (6) Jewell Logan, (7) Clovis 
W. Wallis, (8) A. R. Rochelle, (9) William R. 
Birdwell, (10) Thomas Brantlev, (11) L. D. 
Knight, (12) L. L. McGinnis, (13) Jack Wil- 
liamson, (14) W. 0. Warren, (15) Charles S. 
Combs, (16) Charles Fades, (17) Andrew 
Renick, (18) Ronald Clark. (19) David Mont- 
gomery. (20) Lindle Castle, (21) John Tap- 
scott, (22) Jimmy Edwards. (23) Paul Ford 
Davis. (24) Bro. Kirby, (25) Bro. Brian, 
(26) Russell Garth. (27) Herbert Hatfield, 
(28) Earl Duncan, (29) Willis G. Wells. (30) 
Jesse Lacefield. (31) Robert Keen, (32) 
Ralph Blakev, (33) Willard N. Shropshire, 
(34) Tom Ellis. (35) Kenneth Kuhnert, (36) 
Harold Miller, (37) Kelley B. Stanfield, (38) 
H. 0. Hale, (39) Woodrow Crum. (40) Fred 
Reece, (41) Homer Bickers, (42) Amos 
Black, (43) John G. Heber, (44) T. L. Arter- 
berry, (45) Leon Kingsolver, (46) Jack John- 
son, (47) Raymond Combs, (48) Harold 



Storm, (49) J. W. Thurman, (50) Jack Miller, 
(51) James A. Pursifull, (52) Joe Gilly, (53) 
Rov T. Reasor, (54) Pete Grigsby, (55) 
Morton Combs, (56) W. 0. Gabbard, (57) 
Arthur Mullins, (58) Estill Hall, (59) Arville 
Bailey, (60) Wm. A. Heagen, (61) Julian 
Rees Cunningham, (62) Warren Cooper, 
(63) .Jack Fultz, (64) Cliff Lowdenback. 
Alternates 
(1) Thomas Adkins, (2) Bradford D. 
Mutchler, (3) Joe McPherson, (4) Reed Con- 
der, (5) Charles Akers, (6) George Wooton, 
(7) L Fred Porter, (8) Robert N. Bush, (9) 
L. G. Tubbs, (10) Ralph Horning, (11) J. 
David Boylsen, (12) Robert Watson, (13) 
Howard Owens, (14) Gordon Pogue. (15) 
Maurice Martin, (16) Wavne Ewing, (17) 
Estill (Eck) Branham, (18) Earle Shelton, 
(19) Bob Pardue, (20) Thomas E. Downing, 
(21) Sam Sears, (22) Clyde E. Smith, (23^ 
S. M. Matarazzo. (24) John Stoll, (25) Robert 
B. Clem, (26) Ralph Mills, (27) J. C. Bruce, 
(28) Eurie Smith, Jr., (29) Glenn B. Smith, 
(30) Roy Martin, (31) Mitchell Bailey, (32) 
W. T. McGraw, (33) James O'Connell, (34) 
Heulyn Bishop, (35) James L. Cobb, (36) 
Tom Gabbard, (37) Roy Camic, (38) Cecil 
Hellard, (39) Arthur Cotterill, (40) W. F. 
Russell, (41) 0. C. Leathers, (42) James 
McAfee, (43) J. R. Abney, (44) Rodney 
Brewer, (45) Donald G. Lamb, (46) Jack 
Laswell, (47) Herbert T. Higgins, (48) How- 
ard Corder, (49) Jerry Hacker, (50) Wm. L. 
Hampton, (51) Chester L. Click, (52) Tommy 
Ward. (53) H. E. Wright, (54) F. Delano 
Combs, (55) Claude Frady, (56) H. G. Penny- 
cuff, (57) Glen McDowell, (58) Bill Goble, 
Jr.. (59) Jim Chandler, (60) Howard C. 
Yates, (61) J. B. Cunningham, (62) John 
Edward Allen, (63) John R. Hartig. (64) 
Stanley Ramey. 



State Tournament Information 

The 1959 State High School Basketball 
Tournament will be held in the University 
of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, on March 
18-21. The first session is scheduled for 
Wednesday night. Three sessions will be 
held on Thursday, two on Friday and two 
on Saturday. 

At some time in the month of December 
the Commissioner will send K.H.S.A.A. mem- 
ber schools forms which may be used in re- 
auesting passes to the tournament. These 
forms mav be returned on and after January 
2. 

Complete sets of tickets are priced at 
$8.00 (end seats, balcony) , $12.00 (chair back 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1958 



Page Three 



HISEVILLE— BARREN RIVER EIGHT-MAN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Eow : Byrd, R. Jackson, 
Row : Giiley, Embry, Christie, Cox, Long, Williams. 
Strader, Coach Sadler. 

seats and bleacher seats below the ramps) 
and $20.00 (box seats). The general sale of 
tickets (not school orders) will be conducted 
by the State Tournament Ticket Sales, P. 0. 
Box 1173, Lexington. These orders should 
not be placed before January 15. The amount 
of 25c should be added to each remittance 
(not school orders) to pay for postage and 
insurance charges. Orders mailed prior to 
January 15 will receive a lower priority than 
those mailed on that date. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
MEMBER SCHOOLS OF THE K.H.S.A.A. 

Woodbine Orang'eburg 

(Maysville) 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List compiled December 1) 

number 



If one telephi 
the home phone number ui 
numbers are given, the first 

Abbott, Ben Howard, Ky 

MU 4-5324 
Abbott, Lester B., Route 2, Monticello, Fi 8-3311 (Bus. No.) 



given for an official listed, it is 
;s otherwise designated. If two 
mber is that of the home phone. 

Wesleyan College, Owensboro. 



Abernathy, George R., 324 No. Elm, Henderson, VA 71322 
-ilmond, Alvin, 644 14th, Bowling Green, 3-4850, 3-4334 
Arnold, Marvin R., 365 McLeod Ave., Madisonville, TA 1-4133, 

Ta 1-9091 
Barneit, J. W., 201 College St., Somerset, 741-R, 907 
Beard, Monie, 617 Hampton Ed., Bowling Green, Victor 3-8848, 

Victor 3-603J 
Bennett, W. T., Apt. 7, Reynolds Bldg., Owensboro, MU 4-4665 
Black, Charles D., 138 Pine St., Barbourville, Li 6-4148, Li 

6-4167 
Black, Clarence, West Liberty, Sh 3-4264, Sh 3-3406 
Blackburn, Adrian, Scott Court, Prestonsburg, 2401 
Blanton, Leonard, 2308 Sellar St., Ashland, EA 4-0558, Russell, 

638 
Bonich, Bob, P. O. Box 946, Lynch, Vi 8-5607 
Bosch, Bill, P. O. Box 839, Cumberland, 323-W 
Brooks, Anthony, 730 Clay St.. Henderson, 6-2058 
Burkley, George, "Bud", Clovernook Country Club, Cincinnati 

39, Ohio, Li 2-1074, JA 1-0333 
Bush, Oscar F., Harold, GR 8-6245, GR 8-2255 
Butler, Donald A., 2505 Iroquois Dr., Owensboro, MU 3-3175 
Caldwell, James A., 416 Lindsey, Newport, Co 1-1786, Ex 

6-2200, Ext. 2354 
Campbell, John, Jr., Garrett, 5521, 3461 
Carneal, J. T., 525 12th St., Bowling Green, Vi 3-6923 
Chaney, Rex, P. O. Box 215, Jenkins, 355, 243 
Conley, Ted Lynn, 3227 Walters Hill Drive, Ashland, EA 4-2912 
Cooper, H. T., 3504 Autumn Way, Louisville, GL 8-8323, 

ME 6-1031 
Correll, Bernard L., 606 Military St., Georgetown, 751-W, 

751-W 
Cottrell, David Clark, Estill Ct., Georgetown. 1195, 633 
Cowley, Hays L., Jr., 129 Hamilton Pk., Lexington, 2-6034, 

6-2380 
Cox, Rufus A., 223 Rutter, Earlington, DU 3-4001, DU 3-3301 
Creech, Robert C, Box 785, Eastern Ky. State College, Rich- 
mond 
Current, E. Ray, 1933 Bellefonte Dr., Lexington 
Davenport, Robert B., Shakertown Rd., Burgin, 5204, B180 
Dickerson, William B., 1810 Beacon Hill Rd., Le.xington, 2-4113 
Downing, Dero G., Smallhouse Rd., Bowling Green, 2-5368, 

3-4334, Ext. 9 
Duerson, William Robert, Box 480, Lancaster. 401, 9110 
Elkins, R. Percy, 414 Cove Ave., Box 288, Jenkins, 1007, 58 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1958 



Evans, Thomas P., 980 Meadow Lane, Lexington 

Farmer, John Clay "Jack", 122 North 1st Street, Danville, 

61591, 2192 
Farmer, Ralph, Ruth Rd., Somerset 

Fitzwater, Charles C, 112 Market. Cynthiana, 242-R, 1450 
Forrest, Billy Joe, Court Dr., Fulton, 1650 
Fulkerson, Raymond, 9212 Cornflower Rd., Valley Station, 

WE 7-4158, ME 7-1477 
Fultz, Jack, Box 636, Olive Hill. FA 6-3661, FA 6-4591 

Galloway, Gerald, Route 1, Mayfield, FI 5-2611 

Genti-y, Charles C. Route 4, Oak Grove. ID 9-3405. ID 9-3440 

Gerding. Jim. 1007 Patterson. Newport. AX 1-5152 

Gibson. Fred, 738 1st Street, Henderson, Valley 6-9416, 

7-3705 
Gipe, Logan, 2305 South York St.. Owensboro, MU 4-4953, 

MU 3-3575 
Goldsmith, William, 108 E. Poplar, Elizabethtown, 5-2757 
Green, Walter, Jr., Corbin. 2377, 465 
Greer, Tom, College Heights. Bowling Green 
Groves. Glendal D., Rec. Dept., Western Ky. State Hospital. 

Hopkinsville. Tu 6-4431, Ext. 348 (Bus No.) 
Hagedorn. Thomas. 1907 Howell St., Covington, AX 1-5793, 

Hi 1-9931 
Hale, Ed, 140 Rosemont, Lexington 
Harper, Jimmy, Beechmont, GR 6-2264 
Harris, Jack, Grays Knob, 1950-W 

Harvey, Bennie, 925 Center St., Hendreson, VA 6-3785 
Hayes, Adrian, 1367 Center St., Bowling Green 
Head, Elmo C, Alton Rd., Shelbyville, 1273-W, 142 
Heath, Lary D., 342 Dudley Rd., Lexington, 2-1745 
Hendren, John F., B Co 6th AC, Ft. Knox, 6125 (Bus. No.) 
Hensloy, Hez. Jr., Route 5, Box 131, London, Vol 4-4537 

(Bus No.) 
Hess, Ronnie, 591 Main St., Box 17, Lynch, Vi 8-5916, Vi 8-6486 
Hill, Earl F., 113 Oakley Hill, London, Vo 4-2571 
Hoskins, Charles, 1228 Woodlawn Ave., Louisville 
Huntsman, Bill, Spring Hill, Glasgow, Olive 1-5440, Olive 1-2295 
James, Edward, Route 1, Water Valley 
Jefferson, Charles R., Perry, Elkton, 5-2285, 5-2456 
Jobe, Robert P., 1760 Liberty Rd., Lexington, 2-5454 
Johnson, James B., Box 249, Crestwood, CH 1-8711, CA 8-1709 
Jones, Bobby, Route 1, Box 113, Corbin 
Jones, Robert T., 327 Carver Ct., Madisonville, TA 1-5066 

(Bus. No.) 

Keith. Freeman. Nortonville, Or 6-3144 

Kereiakes, Spero, 9807 Fireside Dr., Valley Station 

Kersey, Jerry R., Alva, Mo 42007, Cumberland College 

King, Allen, 424 N. Brady, Morganfield, 532 W, 2 

Kuhl, Lawrence, P. O. Box 447, Fleming, 7726 

Lambert, Kenneth L., 2221 Bayard Pk. Dr., Evansville, Ind., 

GR 6-6146, HA 5-5252 
Leathers, Ollie C Jr., No. 6 Tanner Dr., Frankfort, 7-4116, 

3-8030 

Lee, William A.. Wallins Creek 
LeForce, Alan. Elm St.. Williamsburg. 6603 
Lequire, H. M., Box 863. Harlan, 1123, 193 
Logue. Ronald Gene, Route 1. Danville. 2084-J, 337-276 
Lusby, George, 504 Clinton St., Georgetown, 678-W, 98 
Lykins, John E., 2 Dogwood La.. Apt 1, Frankfort, CA 7-9526, 
CA 7-2231, Ext. 310 

MeBrayer, Donald E.. 705 Williams Ave.. Raceland, Park 1061 
McCord, Coleman, 981 Delia Dr.. Lexington. 4-9327, 4-2880 
McCov, Larry, 311 E. Main St.. Frankfort, CA 3-3819, CA 3-8973 
McDowell, Glen D.. 504 6th, Pikeville, 252, 252 
McGlone, Maurice Baxton, Box 49, Morehead State College, 

Morehead State 4-9026 
McGuire, Herbert W., 20 Lee, Florence, FL 7-3061 (Bus. No.) 
McMullan. Cecil. Route 2, Golden Pond, WA 4-5504, 3661, 

Eddieville 
McNabb, Edgar, Jr., 2626 Turkeyfoot. Ft. Mitchell, Di 1-4838. 

Co 1-2860 
McNeil. Patrick, McPherson Dr., Madisonville, TA 1-2713, 

TA 1-4914 
Maciel. Jose E., B. Co. 506 Inf.. Ft. Campbell, 3192 
Mack. Joel C. 112F Thomas St.. Lexington, 4-9377, Nicholas- 

ville 622 
Maple, James S.. 3164 Woodward, Erlanger, Di 1-4298, 

Di 1-7305 
Mayabb, Jesse O.. Box 162. Morehead State College. Morehead. 

State 4-9107 
Meiman, William A., 1700 Deer Park. Louisville, Hi 7131W, 

Ju 7-6897 
Miller. Jack, College St.. Barbourville. Li 6-3560 (Bus. No.) 
Miracle. Ed.. Box 998. Lynch. Vi 8-2326, Vi 8-5486 
Molen, James P.. 102 Richardson Dr.. Somerset, 894-L, 1567-R 
Morgan, Tom, Austin Peay State College, Clarksville, Tenn.. 

Mi 5-4775. 5-5525 
Murrell, Allen L.. 706 Oeden. Bowling Green, 2-1286 
Nantz, Wilburn. Wooton 

Newby, Wilson, Route 1. Cave City, GL 32592, GL 32592 
O'Connell, James. 316 Cross St.. Elsmere. Di 1-4464, Di 1-9891 
Pack, Ervin B., Grays Knob. 472-J (Bus. No.) 
Parker, Walker, 735 W. Main, Lexington, 3-2069, 3-3436 



Pate, Freddy, Route 1, Hickman, 2354, 2070 

Payne, James W.. 44 Boone, Berea, 1062 

Pruden, Jim, 21.5 E. 23rd St., Owensboro, MU 3-4555, MU 4-4469 

Pursifull, Cleophus, 808 Dorchester Ave., Middlesboro, 2208 

Rainey, Jimmy, 16 Phillips Ct., Winchester, PI 4-2948, 

PI 4-2818 
Raisor. J. T., 990 Fredericksburg Rd., Lexington, 7-1043, 

4-0304 
Randolph. Charles, 3726 Wheeler, Louisville, EM 8-3449 
Rawlings, Charles M.. 526 Diecks Dr., Elizabethtown. RO 6-9929, 

RO 5-5237 
Rawlings. Harold "Spud", 1120 N. Hill, Radcliff, 2591 Ft. 

Knox, (Bus. No.) 
Reagan, Johnny L.. College Station. Murray, Plaza 3-1345, 

Plaza 3-2310, Ext. 233 
Rentz. Thomas W., 335 Transylvania Pk., Lexington, 4-1091, 

3-2880, Ext. 204 
Ricketts. Claude O., 10217 Starlight Way, Valley Station, 

Warwick 1-9583, ME 4-1561, Ext. 220 
Riley. Don D., 805 East Park, Lynch, Vi 8-2462, Vi 8-5486 
Ring. William H.. 107 Watson Ct.. Frankfort, CA 7-4096; 

CA 7-2281, Ext. 298 
Ritter, Donald. Box 33. Waddy. 739 (Bus. No.) 
Roark, Paul G., Linefork 
Roark, Van V.. Linefork 

Robards. John H.. Jr.. 833 Cay. Henderson, 6-3156 
Rocke, James M., 10 Lewis Circle, Erlanger, Di 1-9082, 

AX 1-2523 
Rodgers. Gordon. Box 794, Richmond, 9144, Keith Hall 
Roeckers, Bernard, 513 Loda Dr., Batavia, Ohio, PL 2-1140, 

SW 3-5553 
Rogers, Howard, 8 Walker Ave., Winchester, 1913-J, 2-2220, 

Ext. 3228 
Rose. Wallace C. 623 Southridge, Lexington. 2-7255 
Rust. Lowell T., Pearl St., Auburn 

Saylor. Gene, 219A Field St., Cumberland, 6R, 269 

Scott, Dickie, P. O. Box 3, Garrett 

Selvy. Curt. Gordon Hill. Corbin 624-W, 1333 

Sheffer, Darrell, College Heights P. O., Box 213, Bowling 

Green 
Sheffer, Larry. Route 2. Morganfield. 269-R 
Shelton. Charles M.. 807 Ridgway St.. Mayfield, 1857 
Simpson, Delane, College Heights, P. O. Box 56. Bowling 

Green 
Slusher. Silas. Beverly 

Smith, Adrian Howard, Route 1, Kirksey. FI 5-2476, Farming- 
ton. Ky. 
Smith. Aubrey. 539 N. Donivan. Princeton. 2155 
Smith. Jack. 57 Mitchell Hill Dr.. Madisonville. 2687-W 
South. William F.. 180 Versailles Rd.. Frankfort 7-6565, 3-3447 
Stevens. O. L.. Jr.. 542 N. 32nd St.. Paducah. 5-5025 
Stith. R. J.. US55619463. A Spec. USATCA. Ft. Knox 
Stone, Doyle C. 109 Moundale. Winchester. 2973 
Story, Ray, Route 3, Waynesburg 

Taylor, Ed. 436 N. 41st Street, Louisville, SP 2-0126, JU 7-6526 

Taylor, Roger, Route 1, Owensboro. MU 3-5341 (Bus. No.) 

Thoma, M. L., 16 Holly St., Berea, 520 

Thomas. Billy. Beattyville 

Thompson. Tommy D., 2304 Kentucky Ave., Paducah, 2-1483, 

3-7338 
Thompson, Thomas A., G-104 Cooperstown, Lexington, 54362 
Tibbs, Sonny, Transylvania College, Lexington 
Tincher. Robert. Nashville Rd., Bowling Green, Vi 3-3380, 

Vi 2-1681 
Turner, Bruce, 1456 High St., Paris, 634, 9060 
Twyman, Louis J., Route 1, Stamping Ground, CA 7-4895 
Tyner, Randall D., Auburn, Li 2-6811 

Van Arsdall, Fred, P. O. Box 104, Burgin, 6104 

Vaughn, Melvin, 1302 South Main St., Corbin, 862-J, 1500 

Walker, Donald C, 220 Holley. Bowling Green 

Watts. Franklin .Hallie 

Watts, Shirley R.. 802 Carneal, Lexington, 6-2743, 2-5494 

Webb, Lonard, Sweeden, LY 6-2146 

Whitaker. James H.. Box 727 Morehead State College, Morehead, 

St 4-9088 
Willey. Harold, 852 W. 4th Street, Huntington, W. Va. 
Williams, Symthe Jack. 316 Murrell Ave.. Frankfort. 77016 
Willis. Jack W., Route 1, Corbin, 464-J, 464-J 
Willson, Martin Wayne. Route 3, Dixon 
Wilson, Burnell Zeke, P. O. Box 1106, Lexington 
Wilson, H. G., 204 N. Maple. Somerset, 1524-W, 1035-R 
Wise. Billy V., 112 N. Ashland, Lexington, 2-0051. 2-6494 
Woodward, Durwood, Box 253, Nortonville, OR 6-3106, Ta 1-6463 
Wright. Paul, 349 Broadway, Hazard, Oak 428, 365 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1958 



Page Five 



HIGHLANDS— NORTHERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Eight) Front Row: Chapman, John Burt, Taylor, Mosley, Emmons, Bentley, Ross, Ullman. Hill, 
Fulmer. Second Row : Kibler, First, Waite, Craig, Lee, Kellen, Knapp, Snow, Borches, Barrett. Third Row : Hall, 
McPhail, Finneseth, Commer, Herfel, Beri-y, Dzeich. D. Moore, Gieir, Jim Burt. Fourth Row: J. Moore. Argenis, 
Hudepohl, Brandhorst, Steinhauser, Rice, Diemar, Stone burner, Sprous. Fifth Row: Coach Rice, Coach Hauck, 
Coach Leucke, Coach Englehard, Coach Hauselman, Coach Gelbke, Coach Sadosky. 

ST. JOSEPH PREP— MID-KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: B. Bird, Hamblin, Dallas Hart, Barton, Myers. Miller, Boone, Hutson, Wyatt, 
Kurtz, Gault, Peters. -Second Row: Thornburg, Bohn, Vogel, T. Carrico, C. Hayden, Simms, T. Hayden, Throg- 
morton, Grigsby, McGinnis, Colman. -Third Row: Coach Dykal, Talbot, E. Guerin, Moore, Blincoe, P. Carrico, 
Downie, Grundy. Day, Maraj'a, M. Guerin, Coach StoU. 

CATLETTSBURG— NORTHEASTERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Wilson, Ferguson, Lee, Smith, J. Stewart, Jordan, Rice, Bates, Hodge, Stan- 
ton, Hunt, Mgr. Eobinette. Second Eow : Hammond, Lewis, Dixon, Benard, Ross, Hush, Swim, Chaffins, A. 
Stewart, Gray, Mgr. Barker. Third Row: Mgr. Caldwell, Branham, Donavan, Robinson, Butler, Crank, Howell, 
McWain, Moore, Eemmele, Maynard, Fowler. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1958 



The Flying Dutchman 

Officials returning from some college 
basketball rules interpretation clinics along 
with some coaches are greatly disturbed 
about a ruling on fouls by the dribbler. 

Most of us have long felt that when the 
official had to rule on charging by the drib- 
bler or a defensive foul by his opponent the 
dribbler too often was given the "break" of 
the officiating. Many of us have contended 
that it appeared that the defensive man 
did not have a right on the floor. 

Over the years in the K.H.S.A.A. Schools 
for officials we have striven with some suc- 
cess to place the greater responsibility on 
the dribbler. All of us felt, though, that great 
care must be taken to keep the pendulum, 
from swinging all the way back in the other 
direction to a point where we might be con- 
tending that it appears the dribbler does not 
have a right on the floor. 

One sport's editor, a dozen or more of- 
ficials and some coaches kept the Dutch- 
man's telephone hot insisting that the col- 
lege interpretation says that the defensive 
man can do no wrong. We felt that they had 
misunderstood the ruling because on Page 
27 of the rule book, under "Ways of Deter- 
mining Responsibility," item 2, it is stated 
that if B legally establishes a guarding 
position in the path of and facing dribbler A 
and a contact foul .occurs, A has the greater 
responsibility. This placement of greater 
responsibility on the dribbler by Kentucky's 
high school officials has been one of the finer 
accomplishments of our clinics — but we still 
recognize that the defensive team can be 
guilty of fouling. 

Because so much concern and confusion 
has developed over the state the Dutchman 
telephoned Cliff Fagan, Executive-Secretary 
of the National Federation of State High 
School Athletic Associations, in Chicago for 
a ruling on this situation. Cliff's ruling fol- 
lows: 

"This letter is in response to your recent 
telephone call during which we discussed 
basketball rule 10-7. The interpretation given 
via telephone will be confirmed in this letter. 

"It should be made clear in 'determining 
responsibility' that there is a difference in 
a situation in which the ball is involved and 
in a situation in which no ball is involved. 
If no ball is involved, and B moves 'in the path 
of moving opponent A so quickly that A can- 
not stop or change direction in time to avoid 
contact, then B is primarily responsible if a 




CLIFF FAGAN 

contact foul occurs.' Misunderstandings arise 
when this principle, as set forth under 'ways 
of responsibility' in item Ic, is applied to a 
situation in which the ball is involved. 

"When the ball is involved, that is, Al is 
a dribbler, the greater responsibility is on 
Al. If Bl, the defensive player, has estab- 
lished a guarding position in the path of the 
dribbler Al, before contact, the foul is on the 
dribbler. 

"Present interpretation does not involve 
how soon the guard legally established him- 
self in the path of the dribbler in a guard- 
ing position but merely if he were in the path 
in a guarding position when the contact oc- 
curred. Obviously, the guard may not be 
moving forward. He could be moving back- 
ward or laterally and the prime responsibil- 
ity would still be on A. 

"The analogy that a dribbler is similar to 
a man driving a car has been used with suc- 
cess by interpreters. When a driver of a 
car is in a congested area, he must have his 
car under control so that he can stop im- 
mediately or turn quickly to avoid anything 
coming into his path. In a less congested 
area, the driver and dribbler may advance 
with greater abandon. At any time a guard 
faces a dribbler and is in front of or in ad- 
vance of the dribbler, the guard is entitled 
to the position and if contact results, it is 
the primary responsibility of the dribbler. 

"The purpose in making the present inter- 
pretation was to assist officials. Secondly, it 
was to make clearer the privileges the de- 
fense is entitled to under the rule. Assum- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1958 



Page Seven 



ing that A is a dribbler, the questions simply 
are these: (1) Did B get there first (not how 
soon) ; (2) was he facing the dribbler? This 
year the interpretation also permits B to 
shift his position to stay in front of A should 
A change his course. You will note that B 
is now also permitted to crouch in order to 
protect himself in case A's forceful contact 
is imminent. B may not move into the path 
of A so that A contacts him after A has 
taken off from the floor in a jump to shoot 
or pass. Should B move into A's path after 
A has taken off and contact results, the pri- 
mary responsibility in on B. 

"Question 1 under Rule 10-7 page 26 of 
the 1958-59 Rule Book is new and explains 
fully the current interpretation. The explana- 
tion 'Ways of Determining Responsibility' on 
page 27 is almost identical with the previous 
year's coverage. You will note that in line 9 
of this discussion, the word 'legally' has been 
inserted before the phrase 'establishes a 
guarding position.' This simply means that 
B must get into a guarding position without 
committing an infraction. Therefore, A has 
the greater responsibility if B establishes a 
guarding position legally, that is, by getting 
into the path of A without contacting A from 
the side or rear. Continuing in line 9, the 
words 'and facing' are added to explain that 
B must be facing the dribbler A in order to 
be in a guarding position. 

"Sincerely yours, Cliff Fagan, Executive 
Secretary." 

Of one thing the Dutchman is certain, 
that being that the rules of basketball are 
too complicated. At our Kentucky Clinics the 
officials are suggesting that the rules makers 
try to get an officiating view point of the 
rules along with other angles concerned. 
This might be a good time to survey the 
National Basketball Committee to determine 
if officiating problems are given proper con- 
sideration. It just does not make sense to 
write rules in the book if it is impossible for 
officials to enforce them. 

Dellard Moor, Sonera's crusading educator, 
has helped many youngsters over many 
humps and could qualify for this month's 
Com Cob Pipe of Honor for this alone. But 
Dellard gets his award for sparking the 
building of a handsome new gymnasium 
which will be dedicated shortly. The Dutch- 
man will be on hand for the occasion. 

Before wishing all of you a Merry Christ- 
mas the Dutchman salutes the Game Guy of 
the month. Joel Boyer of Stearns is high in 
his praises of Jimmie Morgan, a Stearns 



athlete who lost two fingers in a wood-cut- 
ting accident. Jim has proven himself on the 
hard-wood overcoming his handicap to be- 
come a nominee for the Game Guy Award 
of 1959. A lionheart lapel button is on its 
way to Jim Morgan. 

Send your comments on the column to 
The Flying Dutchman, Armory Building, 
Louisville 2, Kentucky. A Merry Christmas, 
Kentuckians ! 



The 1958 Cross Country 

The Trinity High School of Louisville won 
the sixth official K.H.S.A.A. Cross Country 
Run, which was held in Lexington on Novem- 
ber 15. The team score was 121. First place 
was won by Harold Groce of Southern, with 
a time of 10:41.5. The Trinity team was 
coached by Jerry Denny. 

Scores of the eleven full teams which quali- 
fied for the state run were as follows : Trinity 
121 ; Butler, 140 ; Greensburg, 141 ; Flat Gap, 
158; St. Xavier, 180; Meade Memorial, 192; 
Southern, 199; Bourbon County, 238; Tilgh- 
man, 268; Trimble County, 271; Highlands, 
274. 

The State Cross Country Run was held 
on the Picadome Golf Course, and was man- 
aged by the Spiked Shoe Society of the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky. Officers of the Society 
are: Buddy Gum, President; E. G. Plummer, 
Vice President; Press Whalen, Treasurer; 
Dwight Price, Sponsor. Activities of the So- 
ciety are supervised by Dr. Don Cash Seaton, 
track coach at the University. 

Six regional runs had been held on Novem- 
ber 1 for the purpose of qualifying teams and 
individuals for the state event. These runs 
were held at Paducah, Bowling Green, Louis- 
ville, Bellevue, Berea, and Morehead. In ad- 
dition to the teams which qualified, seven- 
teen individual runners qualified as entrants 
for the state affair. 

Ninety-two boys took part in the State 
Cross Country Run. The order in which the 
first fifty finished is given below, including 
the times. 

1— Groce, Southern (10:41.5) ; 2— Cleaver, 
Bourbon County (10:53); 3— Castle, Flat 
Gap (10:57); 4— Matlock, Butler (10:59); 
5-^Cleary, Fern Crek (11:03); 6— Johnson, 
Trimble Co. (11:04); 7— Gerstle, St. Xavier 
(11:05); 8— Howard, John's Creek (11:08); 
9 — Perkins, Greensburg (11:12) ; 10 — Banks, 
Elizabethtown (11:13); 11 — Lewis, Berea 
Found. (11:15); 12— Estep, Flat Gap, (11:- 
16); 13— Blevins, John's Creek (11:17); 14 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1958 



— Pfanstel, Tilghman, (11:18); 15— Steph- 
ens, M.M.I. (11:19); 16— Miller, Highlands 
(11:20); 17— Meek, Meade Memorial (11:- 
21); 18— Collins, Lincoln Institute (11:22); 
19— Ewing, Greensburg (11:23); 20— J. 
Bealmer, Trinity (11:24) ; 21— Rippy, Butler 
(11:25); 22— J. Cunningham, Trinity (11:- 
26);23— D. Bealmer, Trinity (11:27): 24— 
Houk, Greensburg (11:28); 25 — Owens, 
Trinity (11:29); 26— Stead, Southern (11:- 
30); 27— Passafiume, St. Xavier (11:32); 
28— Ward, Meade Memorial (11:33); 29— 
Elmon McKenzie, Flat Gap (11:34); 30-- 
Clark, Bourbon Co. (11:36) ; 31— B. Cunning- 
ham, Trinity (11:37) ; 32— Kroh, St. Xavier 
(11:39); 33 — Brautigan, Simon Kenton, 
(11:40); 34— Jokl, Lafayette (11:41); 35— 
Moll, Trinity (11:42); 36— Larkin, Trinity 
(11:43); 37— Fish, Butler (11:44); 38— 
Mosely, Butler (11:45); 39— Castle, Meade 
Memorial (11:46); 40 — Crawlev, Butler 
(11:47); 41— James, Valley (11:48); 42— 
McMahan, Greensburg (li:49); 43 — Derr, 
Southern (11:50) ; 44— Rhein, Bellevue (11:- 
53) ; 45— Eddie McKenzie, Flat Gap (11:55) ; 
46— Stark, Trimble Co. (11:57) ; 47— Moore, 
Greensburg (12:01) ; 48— Willmoth, Bellevue 
(12:03); 49— Leudeke, Highlands (12:04); 
50— McDonald, Lone Oak (12:05). 



KAPOS NEWS 

Mrs. Stella S. Gilb, Executive Secretary of 
the Kentucky Association of Pep Organiza- 
tion Sponsors, writes the K.H.S.A.A. office 
to the effect that the members of KAPOS 
are planning a newsletter within the next 
few weeks. They need items about honors 
which have been achieved by cheerleaders, 
novel ways of having pep rallies, new skits 
and yells, and specific details on unusual 
courtesies which have been received from 
the host school. Mrs. Gilb assisted in set- 
ting up the program for the cheerleaders 
during the recent YMCA Youth Day on the 
University of Kentucky campus, and later 
met with the sponsors to talk over plans for 
the year. 

Any item to be published in the news- 
letter should be sent to Mrs. Stella S. Gilb, 
College of Education, University of Ken- 
tucky. The next meeting of KAPOS will be 
a brunch, scheduled to be held during the 
finals of the State High School Basketball 
Tournament. Further information as to the 
place and time will be included in the news- 
letter. 

KAPOS representatives want very much 



to have cheerleader sponsors of all K.HlS. 
A.A. member schools as members of the or- 
ganization. Information is needed concern- 
ing the name of this year's sponsor. The 
following schools are members, with these 
sponsors having been appointed : 

Anchorage High School, Mrs. Charlotte 
McGuire; Anderson County High School, 
Mrs. John Boggess ; Annville High School, 
Miss Jerrene Beltman ; Ashland High School, 
Miss Marie Hamm ; Auburn High School, 
Joan Clark. 

Bagdad High School, Jesse Lacefield; Bar- 
bourville High School, Charles Singleton; 
Berea High School, Miss Martha Dodson; 
Bourbon County High School, Mrs. Barbara 
Huffman; Breckinridge High School, Miss 
Nancy Layman. 

Campbell High School, Mrs. Marian J. 
Romo; Central City High School, Delmas 
Gish. 

Dayton High School, Mrs. Irvin Dringen- 
burg; Douglas High School, Lillian Gillispie; 
Dunbar High School, Mrs. Dorothy Bottoms. 

Elizabethtown High School, Paul Kerrick. 

Frankfort High School, Mrs. 0. C. Leath- 
ers; Franklin High School, Mrs. Rosemary 
Weddington. 

Greensburg High School, E. E. Tate; Glas- 
gow High School, Mrs. Pearl Wright; Good 
Shepherd High School, Sr. Charles Benedict. 

Harlan High School, Mrs. Helen Van Cur- 
on ; Hazard High School, H. M. Wesley ; 
Henry Clay High School, Mrs. Weldon Had- 
dix ; Henderson High School, Dorothy Graf- 
ton ; Hindman High School, Edith Orick. 

Irvington High School, Mrs. Jack William- 
son. 

Jefferson Combs Memorial High School, 
Mrs. Grazia Combs; Junction City High 
School, Mrs. John Kirby. 

Lafayette High School, Mrs. Grace Frag- 
stein ; Lee County High School, Mrs. Huda 
Jones; Lincoln Institute, Whitney Young; 
Louisville Male, Mrs. Lois O'Hara; Loyall 
High School, Lee Jones. 

Madison Model High School, Mrs. George 
Spurlock ; Mason High School, Miss Joyce 
Hamilton; Midway High School, Mrs. Wal- 
lace Dawson ; Morganf ield High School, Miss 
Imogene Shelton ; Morton Junior High 
School, Joan Winkler; Muhlenberg Central 
High School, T. E. Spears; McKinney High 
School, Mrs. Lloyd Gooch. 

Nancy High School, Mrs. Elizabeth Warn- 
er ; Nicholas County High School, Miss Jewell 
Ellis; North Middletown High School, J. C. 
Falkenstein. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1958 



Page Nine 



DANVILLE— CENTRAL KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 



1«^ 



m 



:l-'^ 



Iv rt 



r,i fi''t- 






i79i 






'/I*' 



(Left to Right) Front Row: Coach Pickens, Mgr. Boyd,, Mgr. Mason, Griffith Pierce, Boyd, Knight, Chambers, 
Joyner. Minor, J. Ranliin, Evans, Miller, Mgr. Morris, Trainer Horn. .Second Row: Rimstead, Taylor, Cox, 
Sallee, Mace, E, Jacl<son, Wilder, Hoffmeyer, Wise, W. R inkin, Lester, Bibb, Sm.th, Ass't Coach Snowden. Ass't 
Coach Kingsolver. -Third Row' Hayes, Howard, Baugher, John Jackson, Ross. Durham, Kauffman, TuUy, Shearer, 
Whitehouse, Stigall, Leigh, Gordon, joe Jackson, Jones. 



Owsley High School, Mr. and Mrs. Curtis 
Hall. 

Paint Lick High School, Miss Mildred 
McQuery. 

Russell High School, Miss Hugolene 
Hughes. 

Shawnee High School, Sidney Stone ; Simon 
Kenton High School, Mrs. Everette Setters; 
South Christian High School, Mrs. Zora 
Henderson; South Hopkins High School, 
Mabel D. Cheek. 

University High School, Mrs. Ada Mary 
Pyle. 

Williamstown High School, Miss Betty 
Dunnville. 

Principals wishing to enroll their schools 
in KAPOS should send the $1.00 membership 
fee and the name of the cheerleader sponsor 
to Mrs. Gilb. 



BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Conitirraed from Page One) 
ing: If the free throw violation by B caused 
the ball to become dead immediately, it would 
be possible for B to commit repeated viola- 
tions without additional penalty. It could be 
impossible for A to score. The violation might 
be repeated at length. In the case of basket 
interference, there is no opportunity for B 
to repeat the infraction. Since the penalty is 
the awarding of one point, there is no pos- 
sibility of B gaining an advantage by the 
violation. 

42. Play: With the offense responsible for 
action and, after a warning during that per- 
iod, Al holds the ball in the mid-court area. 
The Official begins the 5-second count and; 
(a) he completes it or; (b) moves into the 



mid-court area before the count is completed. 
Ruling: In (a) it is a technical foul on team 

A. The count stops in (b) as soon as Bl moves 
into the mid-court area. 

43. Play: With the score tied and after 
warning during that period: (a) Al alone 
is in the mid-court holding the ball or; (b) 
A2 and A3 are in the mid-court while Al is 
holding the ball there. There are no B play- 
ers in the mid-court as the Official begins 
his 5-second count. Ruling: The defense, team 

B, is responsible for forcing action. If one or 
more B players move into the mid-court the 
count will be broken in (a). In (b) at least 
two B players must move into the mid-court 
to stop the count. 

44. Play: For 5 seconds, in mid-court, Bi 
maintains a guarding position within 6 feet 
of Al, who, to consume time: (a) holds or; 
(b) dribbles the ball. Ruling: Held ball in 
both (a) and (b). 

45. Play: On last free throw by Al, ball 
goes into the basket. Bl is in lane too soon 
and A2 then enters the lane. Ruling : Double 
violation. Point does not count. Ball became 
dead as soon as A2 violated. Jump ball at 
nearest free throw circle. 

46. Play: Bl, who has legally established a 
guarding position in path of Al, turns or 
crouches to absorb shock of charging contact 
by dribbler Al. Ruling: As provided in ques- 
tion 1 following 10-7, it is not an infraction 
for Bl to protect himself in this manner. 
Al is responsible for the contact and com- 
mits a charging foul. 

47. Play: A 3-second violation kills the 
ball while it is in A's back court. Ruling: 
Throw-in is from out of bounds spot nearest 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1958 



the violation which, in this situation, is 
within A's free throw lane extended. 

48. Play: Bonus free throw to which Al 
is not entitled is successful. Bl receives 
throwin and is immediately fouled by A2. 
Captain of B then calls attention to un- 
merited free throw by Al : (a) before or; 
(b) after ball is handed Bl for free throw. 
Ruling: In (a) point from unmerited free 
throw is canceled. In (b), the discovery is too 
late for correction and point counts. In both 
(a) and (b) foul by A2 is charged and Bl 
is awarded free throw or throws due him. 

49. Play: As Al prepares to attempt free 
throw for personal foul, first lane spaces 
are (a) unoccupied or; (b) occupied by A2 
and A3. Ruling: Both first lane spaces are 
to be occupied by opponents of Al. If they 
are unoccupied by the time the Official is 
ready to place the ball at the disposal of Al 
the Official should direct players of B to 
occupy both first lane spaces. B's failure to 
do as ordered by the Official is a technical 
foul. A2 and A3 may not occupy first lanei 
spaces. 

50. Play : Dribbler Al stops instantaneously 
and Bl runs or falls into him from the rear, 
front or side. Ruling: Bl is charging. 

51. Play: Al is erroneously denied a bonus 
throw. During the throw-in, Al commits his 
5th personal and he is then replaced. Before 
ball is placed at disposal of B2, the error is 
discovered. Ruling: Replacement for Al will 
attempt the denied free throw and the ball 
will be dead when made or missed. Bl will 
then attempt his throw or throws. If first 
attempt of Bl is missed, ball remains alive; 
if made, it will be followed by a bonus throw 
or throw-in as the case may be. 

52. Play: On center jump between Al and 
Bl, the tapped ball is first touched (but not 
controlled) in his front court by A2 as he 
slaps it in attempting to gain possession. 
Then: (a) A2 recovers it and passes it to 
A3 in back court; or (b) A3 and B2 touch 
it and A2 finally secures control and passes 
it to A3 in back court. Ruling: Legal in both 
(a) and (b). 

53. Play : A2, in his front court, is first to 
touch but does not secure possession of a 
center jump ball between Al and Bl. Then: 
(a) A3 secures control and passes it to A2 
who returns it to A4 in his back court; or (b) 
B2 secures the ball, dribbles it a few steps 
before fumbling and fumble is recovered by 
A2 who passes ball to A3 in back court. 
Ruling: There is no violation in either (a) 
or (b). 

54. Play: Al is denied deserved bonus free 



throw and: (a) before throw-in, Al is re- 
placed by A6 ; or (b) during throw-in, Al 
commits disqualifying foul against Bl and 
is replaced by A6. Before ball is at disposal 
of B] for his free throw attempt, Captain of 
A calls Official's attention to denial of bonus 
throw due Al. Ruling: In (a), Al returns 
to the court and is given the free throw due 
him. In (b), A6 will attempt free throw in 
place of disqualified Al. The ball becomes 
dead immediately after the free throw at- 
tempt of Al whether made or missed. Bl 
will make his attempt or attempts and the 
ball will remain or become alive as after a 
personal foul. 



Contest Management Details 

The following: excellent outline of arrangements and plans 
necessary for successful interscholastic athletic admin* st ra- 
tion was prepared by the Michigan High School Athletic Assoc- 
iation. It will serve any school very well as a check list. 
As stated in the Michigan Bulletin "... the management of 
its athletic contests is a yardstick by which a school's entire 
athletic program is measured." 

AWAY GAME PREPARATION 

1 — Transportation: Decide on the use of com- 
mon carrier, school bus, or private car transporta- 
tion. The first two listed are most prefei-able in 
that order. Be sure contracts are signed, that the 
leaving and returning times are understood, that 
the place of departure is designated, that the num- 
ber in the party is determined, and that the cost of 
transportation is established. 

2 — Parents' Permit: If a school policy requires 
that permits from parents must be received for 
out of town trips be sure they are on file. Some 
procedure of this type is recommended if for 
nothing more than its school policy and public 
relations values. 

3 — Finances for Trip: The faculty member in 
charge of the trip should be the custodian of all 
funds to be used for meals and lodging (if neces- 
sary). There should be a strict accounting of all 
trip funds. Bus charges should be paid by school 
check. Contract guarantee checks ought not to be 
cashed by school men on trips unless aboslutely 
necessary. 

4 — Equipment: Each player should be charged 
with responsibility for his own personal playing 
equipment. The game equipment should be the re- 
sponsibility of one or more student managers. Have 
a complete record of all equipment taken on a trip 
or any special items issued to players for the game 
concerned. 

5 — ^Game Details: Know the time of the game, 
the place where it will be played, the location of 
dressing rooms, who is to officiate, price of admis- 
sion, and regulations concerning complimentary 
tickets for the visiting team. Band, manager and 
cheerleader arrangements should be understood. 

6 — Eligibility Records: Be sure all players 
making the trip are eligible for the contest to be 
played. Make certain that their names appear on 
the eligibility list. Take this list with you to the 
game along with the one received from the com- 
peting school. 

7 — Game Contradts: Game comtracts should be 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1958 



Page Eleven 



HAZARD— EASTERN KENTUCKY MOUNTAIN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 





78, fa- 6: ,. MhS' 




(Left to Right) Front Row ; T. Fitzpatrick, Sizemore, Petrey, C. Cox. Green, Baker, Cobb. Farler. Crutchfield, 
Smyly, Handy, P. Cox. Second Row: W. Combs, Cannon, K. Fitzpatrick. Rose. S. Williams, Panky. Bassey, Davis, 
Turner. Haliburton. Turpin, McGauhy. Third Row: Philon. Hensley. Fousts. D. Combs, Linden, Gent, G. Johnson, 
VerimilHon. Caywood, Burklow, Bryant, Begley. Fourth Row : B. Johnson. Davidson. Gay, Mgr. Creech, Mgr. 
Barrett. Mgr. Hall. C. Williams. Asbury. Boling. Caudill. Nunn. Fifth Row: Coach Caudill, Coach Eitter, 
Coach Wright. 



in the possession of the individual in charge of 
the trip together with any special correspondence 
concerning the g-ame. 

8 — Trip Personnel: Have a definite time when 
the coach will post a list of team members and 
student managers to make the trip. State the time 
the 'team will leave and then leave at that time. 

9 — Participation Record Books: If it is the 
policy of the school to keep an accurate record of 
all participanlts, the record book should be earned 
on the ti'ip. The responsibility for compilation of 
data may be delegated to a student manager. 

10 — Dress of Team Members: Impress upon 
team members that they are representing' their 
school while traveling on trips as well as during 
contests. Insist appearances be neat and that 
clothes be clean. School representatives must dress 
and act like ladies and gentlemen. 

PRE-HOME-GAME PREPARATION 

1 — ^Contracts: Check all contracts to be certain 
that the day, date, location and hour of contest are 
correct. 

2 — Eligibility Records: See that the home 
school's eligibility record is mailed to the visiting 
school in accordance with state athletic association 
requirements and that one also has been received 
from the visiting school. Have both eligibility 
records available at game time. 

3 — Physical Examinations: Make certain that 
records of physical examinations of all contestants 
are on file. Many schools require this procedure be- 
fore equipment is issued to an athlete. 

4 — ^Parents' Permission: Secure parents' per- 
mission for all eoMtestants. Such procedure may 
clarify athletic injury policies. Permission cards 
should be on file before a student is allowed to 
report for practice. 

5 — Contest Officials: Contracts should be 
checked with all officials prior to games. Be certain 
officials are registered during the current school 
year. At least a week before a contest the home 
school should remind official of the date, time, fee 
and location of the game and the capacity in which 



he is to officiate. Officials' contracts for the game 
should be accessible to the athletic director alt game 
time. 

6 — Equipment: It is the athletic director's re- 
sponsibility to see that there is adequate game 
equipment on hand for the game. Lists of items 
necessary for various sports should be prepai-ed by 
him. 

7 — Field, Court or Pool: Unusual locations or 
temporary circumstances may make special ar- 
rangements necessary concerning fields, courts or 
pools where contests are to be held. Confirm all 
such arrangements in writing in order to obviate 
misunderstandings. Be sure that the visiting school 
is fully informed of any changes in plans. The 
principal or superintendent should have the complete 
schedule of the use of all gymnasiums or fields so 
there will be no conflicts in assignments. 

8 — Publicity: The regular and accepted means 
of publicizing athletic events in the school should 
be followed. The news releasing agent should be 
the coach, athletic director or principal, as they 
may agree among themselves. Student bodies should 
be made familiar with athletic programs and com- 
ing- events through presentation of well organized 
student assemblies. 

9 — Visiting School Courtesies: The visiting 
school should be written a week or ten days prior 
to a contest and advised concerning the location, 
time, date and officials for the game. It also should 
be advised concerning admission prices for students 
and adults, the number of complimentary tickets 
and arrangements for the band if it is to be brought 
to the game. Send a mimeographed schedule of pre- 
game acti-vities. 

10 — Reserve Contests: If a reserve game is to 
precede or follow a varsity team game, complete ar- 
rangements should be made for it. In football, es- 
pecially, many schools find it more convenient to play 
reserve team games on dates other than those on 
which varsity or first-team games are held. 

11 — Tickets: If special, season or complimen- 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1958 



tary tickets are to be prepared and distributed, do 
it early in the season or school year. Have a definite 
ticket accounting- method and insist that it be 
followed, so this phase of the athletic administra- 
tion is conducted in a business-like manner. Make 
certain that ticket prices are well posted and under- 
stood by both schools. 

12 — Programs: Contest programs usually con- 
ti-ibute to an athletic event. They should be informa- 
tive, inexpensive (free, if possible) and easily ac- 
cessible. If programs are to be sold, have an efficient 
sales force organized and demand a complete finan- 
cial accounting. 

13 — ^Concessions: Arrangements for handling- 
concessions at athletic contests must be made well 
in advance. Be sure there is clearance with local 
health officials if food is to be sold. Insist on clean- 
liness. Complete financial reports of all stocks and 
transactions must be required. 

14 — Ushers: Reserved seat sections of bleachers 
require ushers. Have a sufficient number trained 
and on hand for the contests. Some student ushers 
may have to be used; but as many adults as possible 
should be included. 

15 — Police Protection and Parking: Police us- 
ually can be made available to handle crowds, direct 
traffic and aid with parking. Law-enforcement of- 
ficers are at contests to handle any emergencies 
that may arise. It's good administration to have 
proitection at all athletic contests. Make arrange- 
ments with police officials well in advance of contest 
dates. 

16 — Cheerleaders: Well uniformed and courteous 
cheerleaders can do a great deal to keep the crowd 
in the right frame of mind. They are sportsman- 
ship leaders as well as cheerleaders. Their big job 
is that of securing- recog-nition for outstanding- 
plays and examples of good sportsmanship on the 
part of both teams and that of aiding- the school 
and game officials as the contest progresses. They 
may also help much in maintaining proper order. 

17 — Scoreboards: Scoreboards are almost es- 
sential pieces of equipment in modern high school 
athletic contests. Definite an-angenients should be 
made to have one or two adults or reliable students 
to manage the scoreboard reg^ilarly. 

18 — Condition of Stadium, Bleachers or Gym- 
nasium: Upkeep of facilities should be a janitorial 
rather than an administi-ative duty. In many cases, 
however, the athletic staff will have to see that 
facilities are in proper order for a contest. The 
stadium and bleachers should be clean. They should 
be inspeated by fire or police officials prior to the 
opening of the season and at frequent intervals. 
Rest rooms should be fully equipped, sanitary and 
available. Temperature controls for indoor g-ames 
should be inspected and regulated so that they are 
working properly at the time of the contest. B© 
sure that temporary bleachers have been properly 
inspected by authorized officials to insure their 
safety. 

19 — ^Bands and Half-time Arrangements: If 
bands are to be present at a game, make certain 
reserved seats are provided for them in the bleach- 
ers, stadium or on the field. Advise each band of 
the amount of time it will have for maneuvers be- 
tween halves. If a flag raising ceremony is to pre- 
cede the game, make arrangements for all details 
and advise band directors accordingly. 



20 — Decorations: If the field or gymnasium is) 
to be decorated for a contest, include color schemes 
of both schools. Be sure that decorations do not 
interfere with playing facilities. Cross bars or foot- 
ball goal posts or basketball backboards never 
should be decorated or marked in any manner. 

21 — Public Address System: Some schools own 
their public address or loud speaker systems. They 
can be a most valuable adjunct to any athletic con- 
test. Announcers should be trained in their job be- 
fore the contests. Public address announcements 
regarding athletic events generally are most effec- 
tive when made sparingly. Pertinent information 
regarding completed plays, substitutions and ex- 
planations of penalties usually is sufficient. 

22 — Physician at Contests: Arrangements 
should be made well in advance of the contest to' 
have a physician at g-ames. It may be necessary to 
pay for sei-vices of a physician. 

23 — Scorers, Timers, Judges: Adequate provis- 
ions should be made to have these officials at any 
contest requiring their services. Members of the 
faculty usually are most satisfactory for these as- 
signments. Use the same men regularly. 

24 — Dressing Rooms for Visiting Teams and 
Officials: The dressing or locker room facilities for 
visiting teams should be adequate, clean and open 
for their use upon arrival. If possible, a separate 
dressing room, away from both teams, should be 
available for officials. Check to see that these are 
in readiness. 

HOME-GAME DUTIES 

1 — Supplies and Equipment: Have all items 
available for the sport which is being played. 
These include the malterial necessary for the play- 
ing of the game, not uniforms of players. 

2 — Tickets: Tickets should be at booths, with 
sellers and ticket stations as previously assigned. 
Have them on duty sufficiently early before the 
game time with plenty of change. 

3 — Ushers: Ushers should be assigned at sta- 
tions well before game time. 

4 — ^Oontest Programs: Supplies of programs 
should be made in the hands of distributors who 
have been assigned to stations. Distribution of pro- 
g-rams should not be wasteful. 

5 — Officials' Quai-ters: Officials should have 
private dressing- rooms apart from either team. A 
student manager should be assigned to officials. 

6 — Visiting Team Quar-ters and Courtesies: At 
least one student manager should be assigned to 
the visiting team to show its school officals their 
dressing quarters and the way to reach the field or 
gymnasium. He also should inquire if they have all 
all the equipment they need, furnish a supply of 
drinking water (individual cups or bottles if a foun- 
tain is not available on field or in gymnasium) and 
remain on constant call for services to the -visiting 
coach or athletic director. 

7 — Flag Raising: Be sure that the American 
flag is on hand and that students are instrucited as 
to their functions if there is to be a flag-raising 
ceremony. Bands also should understand their part 
of the program. 

8 — Intermission Program: If a program is 
planned between halves of the game, be certain 
all arrangements are completed and thait student 
manag'ers know their duties. 

(Continued in January Issue 
of the ATHLETE) 



We SHiPlTie DaV Vol BuV 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

INCORPORATED 

103 PHONE 104 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



Basketball Season Is Here 

In Stock For Immediate Delivery 

OUR NEW NO. AFR BASKETBALL 

Here's our finest PANEL-LOCK basketball. Exclusive PANEL-LOCK 
design eliminates panel lifting and peeling — assures far superior shot con- 
trol . . . uniform dribble .... uniform backboard rebound. Finest quality 
deep pebbled grain cowhide leather. Wider channel seams for better finger 
tip control. This ball bears the signature of Coach Adolph Rupp of the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky and is used by the Kentucky Wildcats Basketball Team. 
Try one. The price is $21.95. 

We have award sweaters made esnecially to our own exclusive patterns 
by HAND KNIT, IMPERIAL, STADIUM and, of course O'SHEA. 

We have jackets made for us esneciallv by BUTWIN and POWERS; also 
made to our special order, reversible, all styles and fabrics. 

We know of no better values anywhere. 

We can furnish you with athletic award letters in chenille to your order 
of the very highest quality and at reasonable prices. 

Remember that each and every order for any type of merchandise, 
whether special-made or out of stock, gets the personal attention of every 
person in our store. 

We take pleasure in announcing to our many friends in the second, third, 
fourth and fifth regions that Mr. Bill Carter, formerly Sports Editor of the 
Paducah Sun-Democrat, will represent Hunt's Athletic Goods Co., Inc., in 
these regions. 

Remember — you may look forward to hearing from Hunt's through Bill 
Carter in Regions 2, 3, 4 and .5. A card to us and we will call on you im- 
mediately with the best in athletic equipment and service. 

HUNT^S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

INCORPORATED 

PHONE 103 OR 104 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



Superior 

,UTCLIFFE'S^:::BASKETBALL 

EqUIPMEI¥T 



TOURNAMENT BALLS 

No. RSS Rawlings "Seam Sealed" 
Ply-Fused Basketball has been the 
official ball in the State Tournaments 
and will be an official ball for the 
1958 Tourney at Lexington. 

EACH $22.95 

No. 100. The famous Spalding 
•Last Bilt" fuUy molder ball. Official 
ball for any tournament and will be 
one of the official balls sanctioned for 
the 1958 State Tourney at Lexington. 

EACH $22.95 
BASKETBALL GOALS 




No. 260. Schutt "Rigid Build" are 
tops for all college and high school 
use — nothing better. Complete with 
nets— Pair $11. 2S 

No. 338-H. Playground and Back- 
yard Practice Goals — Full official 
size and heavy weight — complete 
with nets— Pair $4.25 

No. ON 120. Extra Heavy Tourna- 
ment Nets — Pair $3.00 




OUTDOOR or 
PLAYGROUND BALLS 

No. CB 2. The popular Voit Rubber 
Co. official top grade rubber covered 
ball for outdoor use. Not affected 
by cinders, gravel, cement or wet 
weather. For outdoors will outwear 
two or more of even the top grade 
leather balls. EACH $11.75 

No. L B 2. Another rubber cov- 
ered Basketball made by the Voit 
Rubber Co., but the inside carcass is 
not quite so durable as the No. CB 2 
above. EACH $5.25 

CONVERSE BASKETBALL SHOES 

Nothing finer and their "All-Star" ' 

shoes are demanded by most of the 
top ranking College and Professional 
teams. 

NO. 9160- Converse "All Star" 

Black Duck Uppers PAIR $7.95 

NO. 9162. Converse "All Star" 

White Duck Uppers PAIR $7.95 

NO. 9350 Converse "Luckv Boy" 
Black Duck Uppers PAIR $5.25 

NO. 9350 Converse "Luckv Boy" 
White Duck Uppers___PAIR $5.50 

MISCELLANEOUS 

No. 610. "Wigwam" Brand Basketball Sox — 
white wool with cotton reinforcement. PAIR 65c. 
No. 637. White Wool Sox with Colored Tops. 
Scarlet, Kelly, Royal, Lt. Gold, Purple, Maroon. 

PAIR 80c. 

No. 9. Official Basketball Score Book— Spiral 
wire binding — 25 games. EACH 70c. 
No. 166. Individual Suit Bag — 16 inch length — 
made of heavy leatherette materiaL EACH $2.10 

TROPHIES 

Tournament and individual Trophies in a com- 
plete Price Range— IN STOCK for "at once" ship- 
ment. Write us for catalog showing a complete 

assortment for vour selection. 





THE SUTCLIFFE COMPANY 



INCORPORATED 





,a 



1 



High khoo/ AtfiMe 



Rating Systems Name Flaget Football Team Best in 1958 







/r 



(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. DeSensi, McDonough, Wheatly, Scheiber, Norton, 
Meyers, Riggs, Kannapel, Meagher, McCall, B. Weihe, DeWees, Fowler, Washer, Scherer, 
Heun, R. Michels. Second Row: Mgr. Doyle, Bouchard, Siegel, Joe Schmidt, Furlong, Ryan, 
John Schmidt, Buchanan, Hagerty, Norris, Gregory, Burke, Riggs, K. Lehmann, Barker, McGill, 
Abell, Langford, Denton. Third Row: D. Michels, S. Weihe, Lenhart, Hartlage, Sellinger, 
R. Lehmann, Montgomery, Gebhart, Jansing, Wilder, Gossman, Richards, O'Daniel, Carricato, 
Wuerth, Steiger, Schnellenberger, Miller, Ansert, Masterson, Wuertz, Mgr. Cain. 



Flaget 34— Lafayette 2 
Flaget 31— Mayfield 7 
Flaget 27— Trinity 14 
Flaget 25— Male 14 
Flaget 42— Lou. Central 6 



Flaget 28— duPont Manual 13 
Flaget 6 — Cincinnati Purcell 
Flaget 14— St. Xavier 
Flaget 20— Highlands 7 
Flaget 0— Toledo Central 9 




Official Organ olihe KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
JANUARY - 1E59 



Caldwell County Western Kentucky Athletic Conference Champion 




.^^ilH^.i 






swwwt'i®!tf<^-r? It 



L 




r -^^ 







(Left to Right) Front Row: Mallory, C. Crider, Hopper. Bates Boren. Murray, L. Johnson. Second Row: 
Patterson. J. Johnson. Flvnn. Bevel. Lewis. Hunsaker. MitchelL Pool. Moore. Goodwin. Childress. Hart, Griffith. 
Murphv. Willis. Third Row: Cain. Kennady. Curlin. Woolwine. J. Crider, Watson. Blackburn. Beckner, Byrd, 
Morris. Bruce, Manus. Mann. McCaslin. 



Conference Standings 

Barren River Eight-Man Conference 



Evarts 2 .5 1 

Wallins 16 

Leslie County 5 





Won 


Lost 


Tied 


Dickinson 
Rating 


Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference 


Hieeville 


8 










Hazard 


6 










Temple Hill 


G 


2 







Jenkins 


7 


1 







Austin-Tracy 


3 


5 







Belfry 


6 


1 







Caverna 


?j 


5 







Prestonsburg 


4 


3 







Park City 





8 







Paintsville 


3 


4 







Bluegrass Eight-Man Conference 


Fleming 


4 


3 







Perryville 
Berea 
Eminence 
Paint Lick 


7 
7 
4 
4 



1 
2 
4 




1 







M, C, Napier 
Pikeville 
Whitesburg 
Elkhotrn City 


1 
2 
1 



4 
5 
5 
8 










Mt. Vernon 


2 


6 







Mid 


-Kentucky 


Conference 




Burgin 


1 


6 


1 




St, Joseph 


4 


1 


1 


21.66 


Camp Dick Robinson 


1 


7 







Ft. Kno.x 


5 





1 


20,S3 


Central Kentucky Conference 

Danville ,5 
Lancaster 8 
Winchester 6 1 1 


24.00 
22.00 
21,50 


Elizabetbtown 

Lebanon 

Springfield 

Glasg-ow 

Old Kentucky 


5 
4 
5 
2 
Home 2 


2 
2 
2 

5 






1 
1 


21,66 
20,00 
20.00 
15.00 
13.75 


Mt. Sterling _ , „ 


y 


" 


u 


21.00 


Bardstown 


2 


4 





13.33 


M. M. L 


5 


1 





20.00 


St. Charles 


1 


5 





11.66 


Shelbyville 




2 





20,00 


Shephei-dsville 





G 





10.00 


Madison 
Frankfort 




3 
3 




1 


20.00 
19,72 


Northeastern 


Kentucky 


Athletic 


Conference 


Henry Clay 




3 





18,00 


Catlettsburg- 


4 


1 







Georgetown 
Jessamine County 




4 
4 






16,66 
16,25 


Louisa 
Raceland 
McKell 
Russell 


3 

2 


1 




1 




Versailles 
Anderson 




4 
5 




16,11 
15.00 


2 
1 


3 

2 



2 




Harrodsburg 




6 




11.87 


Wurtland 





3 


1 




Paris 




6 




11,87 


Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 


Cynthiana 




7 




11.66 


Highlands 


8 







30.00 


Irvine - 




7 




11.66 


Di,xie Heights 


6 


1 




25,00 


Stanford 




6 





11.42 


Newport 


4 


2 




20,00 


Carlisle 




6 





11.42 


Bellevue 


- 5 


4 




17,22 


Somerset 




1 







Holmes 


2 


3 




16,00 


Cumberland 


Valley 


Conference 




Boone Co. 


4 


4 




15,00 


Lynch 


6 










Campbell Co, 


4 


4 




15,00 


Benham 


5 


1 







Dayton 


3 


5 




13,75 


Black Star 


4 


] 


1 




Lloyd 


2 


6 




12,50 


Loyall 


4 


2 







Ludlow 


1 


5 




11,67 


Cumberland 


1 









Beechwood 





5 




10,00 


Hall 


- 


T) 







(Conliiuied on I 


age Twelve) 





The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXI— NO. 6 



JANUARY, 1959 



l.OO Per Year 



Commissioner's Message 

The Association continues to make pro- 
gress, and it might be a good thing to take 
stock at a time of the year which is normally 
considered inventory time. 

The first official football championships, 
with three classes involved, are scheduled to 
be determined in the fall of 1959. Regulations 
concerning the play-offs appeared in the 
October issue of the ATHLETE, and the 
classification of schools by regions appears 
elsewhere in this issue. Football lovers con- 
sider the proposed plan a milestone in the 
history of the K.H.S.A.A., and it is hoped 
that it proves to be just that. It may be 
necessary to change some of the regulations 
from time to time, but at least Kentucky 
school men are preparing to "get the show on 
the road." 

The basketball season seems to be well 
under way with a full head of steam. Fine 
teams are appearing all over the state, and 
it is safe to assume that at State Tourna- 
ment time the Association will crown an- 
other great champion. Hundreds of com- 
petent basketball players are graduating 
from Kentucky schools each year. Many of 
these boys help to fill out the squads of Ken- 
tucky colleges, where some attain national 
renown. Others attend colleges elsewhere, 
and some of these boys have also been out- 
standing in basketball and other sports. All 
of this must be intensely gratifying to their 
coaches and other friends. 

Information secured from the statement 
forms on which the names of the coaches in 
the various sports are listed indicates that 
1958-59 will be a banner year for baseball, 
track, and the minor sports. Many thousands 
of dollars are budgeted annually by the As- 
sociation for spring and minor sports, and it 
is this financial shot in the arm which has 
helped increase interest in these activities. 

Each year it appears that our school men 
are having to make fewer corrections in the 
certifications of their players. This is prob- 
ably because more of them are requiring 
birth certificates of their players, or are 
checking more carefully on records found in 
the offices of their county court clerks. Al- 
though this is not primarily an article con- 
cerning suggested procedure, may we urge 



our principals, as we have done on numerous 
occasions in the past, to beware of the de- 
layed certificate, based on information filed 
with the State Bureau of Vital Statistics 
several months or years subsequent to the 
date of birth. The Commissioner and the 
Board of Control prefer to accept the earliest 
available school enrollment and census 
records 

We are glad to report that most high 
school games are now well policed, and that 
violations of K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 17, Practice 
of Sportsmanship, are apparently on the 
wane. We say this early in a season where 
there is already a lot of hot competition, fully 
realizing that by the time this issue of the 
magazine comes from the press some incident 
may have happened which will cause us to 
eat our words. We do know that many of our 
school administrators and coaches are work- 
ing hard at the job of improving the sports- 
manship in their schools and communities, 
and we know that these efforts are bringing 
results. The State Y.M.C.A. and the Ken- 
tucky Association of Pep Organization Spon- 
sors have rendered fine assistance on the 
sportsmanship front. 

During the current basketball season a 
few incidents have been reported where fans 
have been discourteous to officials im- 
mediately following the games. Verbal abuse 
has been involved in these cases. We suppose 
that a certain amount of dissatisfaction on 
the part of the losers is inevitable, but we 
know that a troublesome spectator who "tells 
off" the official week after week without his 
activities being checked by the administrator 
or coach may well get his school in trouble 
eventually with violation of By-Law 17 be- 
ing involved. Game managers should be alert 
in spotting these trouble-makers and in ex- 
plaining to them the implications of the rule 
mentioned. 

Our principals are now reporting dis- 
qualifications promptly. Considering the fact 
that some five hundred high school basket- 
ball games are being played each week, the 
number of players disqualified to date has 
been remarkable few. Unless the disqualifi- 
cation follows trouble which was very serious 
in nature, the player is usually restored to 
competition on a first offense. 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1959 



JANUARY, 1959 VOL. XXI— No. 6 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at "Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60). Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61). Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones. (1957-61) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
(1958-62) Franklin: Jack Dawson (1958-62), Louisville; Robert 
P. Forsythe (1955-59), Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie (1955-59), 
Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 

^rom the Commissione'i s CJfflce 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1958 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



"Approved" and "Certified" Officials" 

A large number of K.H.S.A.A. registered 
officials qualified for the advanced rating 
of "Approved" and "Certified" as a result 
of the National Federation basketball exami- 
nation, which was given in Kentucky on 
December 1, 1958. The "Approved" rating 
does not carry forward from year to year, 
but must be earned each year. After an of- 
ficial has received the "Certified" rating, he 
keens this rating bv clinic attendance. Only 
officials recei\ang these higher ratings are 
elip-ible to work in the regional tournaments. 
Onlv "Certified" officials, who are residents 
of Kentucky, are eligible to work in the 
State Tournament. 

Basketball officials who qualified for ad- 
vanced ratings during the current season 
are as follows: 

Certified Officials 



Adkins, Raymond C. 
Alexander, Rex 
Almond. Alvin 
Balcer, James E. 
Pallard, .Jack H. 
Parnett, J. W. 
Bennett. Bert 
BAt7. Richard I. 
Black. Charles D. 
Blackburn, Clyde W. 
Blackburn, Viley O. 
Bridges. Bennie 
Brizendine, Vic 
Broderick, Carroll A. 
Brown, Bryant 
Brown. James W. 
Buis. Nathaniel A. 
Ci steel. Ralnh M. 
Chumbler, W. W. 



LonsT, Bill 

Loneenecker, David M. 
Looney, Dick 
Lufas. Gene 
McClellan, L. B. 
McDowell, Glen D. 
McGuffey. Harold 
McT,eod, Robert N. 
McPike, Ray S., Jr. 
Macon, Alan Leon 
Mahan, Boyd 
Maines, George 
Meade. Foster "Sid" 
Metcalf, Earl L. 
Miller, Bob 
Miller, Rex J. 
Miller, Roy J. 
Mudd, Ed' 
Mueller, Frank J. 



Coleman, L. J. "Duke" Mussman, Ralph 
Combs, Travis' Nau, William E. 

Conley, George Neal, Gene 

Cooper, John Wellington Newton, C. M. 
Cooper, WaiT«n Nord, Ed 

Craft, Bill Omer, Billy W. 

Crawford, Fred T. Padgett, R. K. 

Crosthwaite, John S., Jr. Parker, Billie E. 



Cummins, Al 
Davis, Don 

Davis, Dwight R., Jr. 
Dotson, John B. 
Downing, Dero 
Duncan, Earl 
Durkin, Jack 
Eaton, James M. 
Edelen, Ben R. 
Elrod, Wm. Turner 
Feix, Jimmie 
Ferrell, Doctor T. 
Fey, Allen 
Fields, Joe D. 
Fritz, Sherman 
Gardner, Howard E. 
Goley, James E. 
Gora'nflo, R. E. 
Grisham, Jesse R. 
Gustafson, Al, Jr. 
Fagan, Joe 
Haynes, John 
Heldman, John, Jr. 
Hewling, Franklin 
Hewling, Richard 
Hines, G. Cliff 
Hodge, Fred 
Hodges, Holbert 
Hofstetter, Joe 
Inman, Briscoe 
Irwin, Charles R. 
Jenkins, James 
Jenkins, Kean 
Johnson, Walter 
Jordan, Kenneth P. 
King, Bob 
King, Jim 
King, P. J. 
Kinman, Joe T. 
Knight, Bill 
Kremer, Joe 
Lance, Walter 
LeVan, Thomas F. 



Pergrem, Bernard 
Phelps, Ralph "Rudy" 
Powell, Logan 
Pursifull, Cleophus 
Redman, Malvern G. 
Reed, (Gordon 
Reinhardt, Myron 
Richardson, Joe M. 
Ricketts, C. O. 
Roberts, Earl C. 
Rocke, James M. 
Roller, Otis 
Rouse, Clyde L. 
Rubarts, Leland G. 
Russell, Allen W. 
Sanders, Mel 
Schlich, Paul E. 
Settle, Evan E., Jr. 
Settle, Roy G. 
Shaw, Stanley 
Small, Bill 
Smith, Edgar J. 
Sosh, LaRue 
Stanfill, Robert 
Steenken, Wm. R. 
Stephenson, Harry S. 
Strange, Bill 
Taylor, Ed 
Taylor, Robert S. 
TeagTie, Amos 
Thompson, Jack 
Varble, William 
Vettiner, Charlie 
Weisbrodt, Paul 
Welch, Ralph W. 
Wells, Milford 
Wesche, James A. 
White, David B. 
Williams, Tom M., Jr. 
Winchester, Roy L. 
Winfrey, Shelby 
Wurtz, Emil 
Yessin, Humzey 



Approved Officials 

Allen, Nelson R. Lytle, Price 

Barry, Harold L. 

Bi'own, E. C. 

Brummett, Joe 

Chattin, Charles 

Cooke, George W. 

Craig, John G. 

Cnitcher, James W. 

Davenport, William 

Drake, Richard R. 

Driskell, Earl, Jr. 

Flynn, Bobby 



McGuire, Claude 
Meyer, Bud 
Miller, William A. 
Monroe, Robert W. 
Nixon, James W. 
O'Nan, Eugene 
Overly, Wm. H. 
Page, Forrest C. 
Richards, Jim S. 
Riggs, Wm. T. 
Roby, Joseph L. 



Foster, William R.. (Bob) Rothfuss, Richard 

Gibson, Romulus Shaw, Earl 

Harrell, Bill D. Spencer, Irvin 

Hayes, Douglas Tipton, Asa 

Huter, Jim Weaver, Ray 

Jones, Boyer Williams, Roger 

King, Allen V. Wise, Jack 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1959 



Page Three 



1958-59 MEMBERSHIP IN THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

REGION 1 



School 


Address 


Principal 


Basketball Coach 


D. 1 Carlisle County 


R. 3, Bardwell 


0. J. Mitchell 


Thomas Adkins 


Central 


Clinton 


James H. Phillips 


James Webb 


Fulgham 


R. 1. Clinton 


E. L. Clark 


Harold Romaine 


Fulton 


Fulton 


J. M. Martin 


Charles Thomas 


Fulton County 


Hickmam 


Robert Summers 


Harold Garrison 


Riverview 


Hickman 


A. W. Greene 


A. W. Greene 


D. 2 Ballard Memorial 


Barlow 


Robert G. Fiser 


James Ffank 


Heath 


R. 1, W. Paducah 


A. L. Roberts 


William E. Carter 


Lincoln 


Paducah 


E. W. Whiteside 


John C. McVoy 


Lone Oak 


Lone Oak 


John Robinson 


Don Stephension 


Paducah Tilghman 


Paducah 


Bradford D. Muitohler 


Otis Dinning 


Reidland 


R. 8, Paducah 


Richard L. Winebarger 


Tommy Stephenson 


St. John 


R. 5, Paducah 


Sr. Mary Marcia, R.S.M 




St. Mary's Acad. 


Paducah 


Sr. Alma Clare 


Jack McKinney 


D. 3 Cuba 


R. 1, Mayfield 


Joe McPherson 


Wilton Roach 


Dunbar 


Mayfield 


F. I. Stiger 


Asberry Dawson 


Fancy Farm 


Fancy Farm 


Sister Celine Maria 


Sammy Hayden 


Farmington 


FaaTnington 


C. W. Jones 


Larry H. Colley 


Lowes 


Lowes 


Henry O'Daniel 


Rex Smith 


Mayfield 


Mayfield 


Barkley Jones 


J. B. Story 


Sedalia 


Sedalia 


McCoy Tarry 


Cletus Hubbs 


Symsonia 


Symsonia 


Cecil Reid 


Joe Ford 


Wingo 


Wingo 


Howard V. Reid 


Virgil Yates 


D. 4 Almo 


Almo 


William B. Miller 


William B. Miller 


Benton 


Benton 


J. Delton Dodds 


Billy Joe Farris 


Douglass 


Murray 


L. P. Miller 


Frank Terrell 


Hazel 


Hazel 


Guy Lovins 


Richard Vincent 


Kirksey 


Kirksey 


M. B. Rogers 


George W. Dowdy 


Lynn Grove 


Lynn Grove 


Raymond L. Story 


James Presson 


Murray 


Murray 


Fred Schultz 


Robert G. Jeffrey 


Mun-ay Training 


Murray 


Mac G. McRamey 


Garrett Beshear 


New Concord 


New Concord 


Edward T. Curd 


Gene S. Cathey 


North Marshall 


Calvert City 


Robert Goheen 


Charlie Lampley 


South Marshall 


R. 1, Benton 


Reed Conder 

REGION 2 


Mason Cope 


D. 5 Caldwell County 


Princeton 


Guy G. Nichols 


Vernon Wilson 


Crittenden County 


Marion 


Lathan Keatts 


Dean Akridge 


Dotson 


Princeton 


B. S. Miller 


J. W. Withrow 


Fredonia 


Fredonia 


Odell Walker 


Mervil Phelps 


Livingston Central 


Burna 


Kenneth T. Hardin 


Frank Wright 


Lyon County 


Kuttawa 


John E. Floyd 


William Cothran 


Trigg County 


Cadiz 


Paul Perdue 


Charles Quisenberry 


D. 6 Charleston 


Dawson Springs 


Lewis Good 


Jewel Logan 


Dalton 


Dalton 


A. 0. Richards 


Edwin Martin 


Dawson Springs 


Dawson Springs 


(Supt.) R. A. Belt 


George Perry 


Earlington 


Earlington 


James W. Larmouth 


James W. Larmouth 


Hanson 


Hanson 


Brad Cox 


Brad Cox 


Madisonville 


Madisonville 


Weldon Hall 


C. G. Sherrell 


J. W. Million 


Earlington 


Lester G. Mimms 


Lester G. Mimms 


Nebo 


Nebo 


A. C. Carmeal 


George Wooton 


Rosenwald 


Madisoinville 


Mrs. Pearl Amett 


Caldwell Smith 


South Hopkins 


Nortonville 


Charles Jenkins 


Earl Adkins 


D. 7 Attucks 


Hopkinsville 


Frank B. Simpson 


William M. Falls 


Crofton 


Crofton 


L Fred Porter 


John Remdek 


Hopkinsville 


Hopkinsville 


Chester C. Redmon 


Billy Brannock 


Lacy 


R. 7, Hopkinsville 


Edward P. Hickey 


Don Holmes 


Pembroke 


Ptembroke 


Mrs. L. W. Allen 


Larry Tribble 


Sinking Fork 


R. 5, Hopkinsville 


Charles E. Yates 


Charles E. Clayton 


South Christian 


Hemdon 


Clovis W. Wallis 


Richard Covington 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1959 



School 



Address 



D. 8 Clifty Clifty 

Guthrie Guthrie 

Todd County Elkton 

Todd County Trng. Elkton 



Principal 

O. P. Hurt 
A. R. Rochelle 
Robert N. Bush 
William R. Gilbert 



Basketball Coach 

Perry F. Hill 
Waldo Wolfe 
Harold Ross 
Jimmy Han-is 



REGION 3 



D. 


9 


Clay 

Dixon 

Providence 

Rosenwald 

Sebree 

Slaughters 




Clay 

Dixon 

Providence 

Providence 

Sebree 

Slaug^hters 


D. 


10 


Douglass 

Dunbar 

Henderson 




Henderson 

Morganfield 

Henderson 






Henderson 


County 


Henderson 






Holy Name 




Henderson 






Morganfield 




Morganfield 






St. Agnes 




Uniontown 






St. Vincent 


Acad. 


St. Vincent 






Sturgis 




Sturgis 


D. 


11 


Bremen 
Calhoun 
Livemiore 
Sacramento 




Bremen 
Calhoun 
Livemiore 
Sacramento 


D. 


12 


Daviess County 


Owensboro 






Owensboro 




Owensboro 






Owensboro 


Catholic 


Owensboro 






Utica 




Utica 






Western 




Owensboro 



Mrs. Irene Powell 
P. D. Fancher 
L. G. Tubbs 
Herschel Martin 
James M. Lynch 
William R. Birdwell 

H. B. Kirkwood 
E. R. Hampton 
Russell R. Below 
Lewis N. Johnson 
Sister Albert Mary 
Thomas Brantley 
Rev. R. G. Hill 
Sister Francis Anna 
H'Earl Evans 

Hoy R. Long 
L. D. Knight 
J. David Boyken 
Paul Phillips 

W. P. Wheeler 
Joe O. Brown 

Sister Helen Constance 
Robert H. Berry 
H. E. Goodloe 



Frank Davis 
MoiTis Coffman 
L. G. Tubbs 
Herschel Martin 
Byron Watkins 
JeiTy Gamble 

Peter Rembert 
E. R. Hampton 
Donald Chapman 
Norman O'Nan 
James K. Lindenberg 
Walter Banull 
Rev. Joseph M. Mills 
Charles Gorman 
H. D. Holt, Jr. 

Delbert Settle 
Hai-vey Hackworth 
Jerry Whitsell 
Bob Daniels 

W. B. Sydnor 
Robert Watson 
Rev. R. W. Connor 
Frank A. List 
Wai-ren Moxley 



REGION 4 



D. 13 Breckinridge Co. 
Flaherty 
Frederick Fraize 
Hawesville 
Irvington 
Lewi sport 
Meade County 



Hardinsburg 

R. 3, Vine Grove 

Cloverport 

Hawesville 

Ii-vington 

Lewisport 

Brandenburg 



R. P. Peters 
D. T. Starks 
Earl Grimes 
B. H. Crowe 
William 0. Jackson 
Forrest Williamson, Jr. 
Mrs. C. P. Miller 



Howard Owens 
Terry Cummins 
Owen Dieterle 
Denzil Mefford 
Jack Williamson 
Edgar Payne 
Willis B. Simpson 



D. 14 Brownsville 

Butler County 

Caneyville 

Clarkson 

Kyrock 

Leitchfield 

Sunfish 

D. 15 Beaver Dam 

Centertown 
Fordsville 
Hartford 
Horse Branch 

D. 16 Central City 
Drakesboro 
D'boro Community 
Graham 
Greenville 
Hughes-Kirk 



Brownsville 

Morgantown 

Caneyville 

Clarkson 

Sweeden 

Leitchfield 

Sunfish 

Beaver Dam 
Centertown 
Fordsville 
Hartford 
Horse Branch 

Central City 

Drakesboro 

Drakesboro 

Graham 

Greenville 

Beechmont 



Muhlenberg Central Powderly 



J. P. Alexander 
Foyest West 
Ramon Majors 
James M. Wood 
R. E. Hendrick 
John Hill Taylor 
John M. Lane 

Shelby C. Forsythe, Jr. 
William T. Leach 
Earl S. Reid 
Charles S. Combs 
W. M. Arnold 

Delmas Gish 
Willard J. Wilcutt 
William Traylor 
James Jennings 
John R. Owens 
Lyle C. Baugh 
T. E. Spear 



G. Pogue 
W. O. Warren 
Henry McCarley 
Bovimian Davenport 
Kaye Don Van Meter 
John Hill Taylor 
Oren H. Webb 

Maurice Martin 
William T. Leaoh 
Bi-uce Stewart 
Charles S. Combs 
Cecil Schirtzinger 

Jackie Day 
Tom Neathamer 
N. E. Pritchett 
Wayne Ewing 
Kenny Sidwell 
Charles Eades 
L. B. Gaston 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1959 



Page Five 



REGION 5 



School 

D. 17 Alvaton 

Bowling Green 

Bristow 

College 

Franklin-Simpson 

High Street 

Lincoln 

North Warren 

Richardsville 

St. Joseph 

Warren County 



Address 

Alvaton 

Bowling Green 

R. 1, Bowling Green 

Bowling Green 

Franklin 

Bowling Green 

Franklin 

Smiths Grove 

Richardsville 

Bowling Green 

Bowling Green 



Principal 

Arthur M. Reynolds 
Raymond H. Hendren 
Prentice L. Gott 
Dero G. Downing 
J. W. Dunn 
E. T. Buford 
W. H. Story 
Andrew Renick 
George Coker, Jr. 
Sister John Lynette 
C. H. HaiTis 



Basketball Coach 

James Walker 
Denvil Barriger 
James Hill 
Alvin Almond 
Clarence Musgrave 
F. O. Moxley 
George Davis 
Robert Fox 
Robert J. Gover 
Robert Siddens 
Jesse Kimbrough 



D. 18 Adairville 
Auburn 

Chandler's Chapel 
Lewisiburg 
Olmstead 
Russell ville 



Adairville 

Auburn 

R. 2, Auburn 

Lewisburg 

Olmstead 

Russellville 



0. W. Lovan 
H. M. Watkins 
Morris Shelton 
Joe M. Vance 
W. N. Alexander 
Harold Hunter 



Ralph Sharp 
Ronald Clark 
Thomas D. Garrett 
Van Washer 
Earle Shelton 
James Young 



D. 19 Allen County 
Austin Tracy 
Bunche 
Glasgow 
Hiseville 
Park City 
Scottsville 
Temple Hill 



Scottsville 
Lucas 
Glasgow 
Glasgow 
Hiseville 
Park City 
Scottsville 
R. 4, Glasgow 



T. C. Simmons 
K. B. Sidwell 
L. J. Twyman 
Edwin J. Mayes 
Lenis Reece 
W. L. Gardner 
H. H. Patton 
David Montgomery 



James Bazzell 
Aaron Turner 
D. D. Nollez 
Earl Bradford 
George Sadler 
Lloyd Shai-p 
Ernest C. Neil, II 
Bob Pardue 



D. 20 Clinton County Albany 

Cumberland County Burkesville 
Gamaliel Gamaliel 

Marrowbone Marrowbone 

Metcalfe County Edmonton 
Tompkinsville Tompkinsville 



L. H. Robinson 
Leon King 
Edwin Steen 
Ralph Clark 
Garland Creech 
Randall Grider 



Lindle Castle 
James Coe 
Thomas E. Downing 
W. K. Non-is 
Cortez Butler 
John C. Marrs 



REGION 6 



D. 21 Adair County 
Campbellsville 
Durham 
GreensbuTg 
Lebanon 
Rosenwald 
St. Augustine 
Sit. Charles 
St. Francis 
Taylor County 



Columbia 

Campbellsville 

Campbellsville 

Green sburg 

Lebanon 

Leganon 

Lebanon 

R. 2, Lebanon 

Loa-etto 

Campbellsville 



Brooks Coomer 
Paul Coop 
M. J. Strong 
Eugene E. Tate 
Charles F. Martin 
Mrs. W. R. Smith 
Sr. Doloretta Marie 
Sister M. Raphael 
Sister Charles Asa 
J. G. McAnelly 



John Burr 

Paul Coop 

S. V. Wickliffe 

Richard Shrewsbury 

John Tapseott 

Herbert Jones 

Rev. James L. Schlich 

John Deppner 

Sam B. Thomas 

Billy B. Smith 



D. 22 Caverna 
Cub Rim 
LaRue County 
Memorial 
Munfordville 



Horse Cave 
Cub Run 
Hodgenville 
Hardyville 
Munfordville 



Wilbur Smith 
James E. Redden 
Everett G. Sanders 
Lynn D. Thompson 
H. D. Puckett 



Ralph C. Dorsey 
Clyde E. Smith 
Cortland K. Cox 
Jimmy Edwards 
Don Bales 



D. 23 Elizabethtown 
E'tovsTi Catholic 
Ft. Knox 
Glendale 
Howevalley 
Lynnviale 
RineyviUe 
Sonora 
Vine Grove 



Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown 

Ft. Knox 

Glendale 

R. 1, Cecilia 

White Mills 

RineyviUe 

Sonora 

Vine Grove 



Paul E. Kerrick 
Sister Nerinckx Marie 
S. M. Matai-azzo 
Damon Ray 
Earl B. Goodman 
Paul Ford Davis 
H. L, Perkins 
Dellard Moor 
James T. Alton 



Charles Rawlings 
Hardin McLane 
Bob Burrow 
Edwin Goodman 
William Jones 
David Buchanan 
Clarence Perkins 
Bobby Houk 
Ron Chumbley 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1959 



School 

D. 24 Bardstown 

Bardstown Tmg. 

Bloomfield 

Fredericktown 

Mackville 

Old Ky. Home 

St. Catherine 

St. Joseph Pi-ep. 

Springfield 

Willisburg 



Address 

Bardstown 

Bardstown 

Bloomfield 

R. 2, Springfield 

Mackville 

Bardstown 

New Haven 

Bardstown 

Springfield 

Willisburg 



Principal 

Vincent Zachem 
Charles H. Woodson 
T. T. Etheredge 
Sister Mary Ephrem 
R. C. Honaker 
J. H. Harvey 
Sister Jean Mark 
Bro. DeSales, C.F.X. 
(Supt.) Bennett R. Lewis 
L. H. Anthony 



Basketball Coach 

Gatmis Martin 
Charles H. Woodson 
Ernest Ruby 
Robert Hamilton 
Thos. E. Cunningham 
Bill Parrott 
Rev. H. L. Mitchell 
John Stoll 
Joseph A. Jake 
Mike Speck 



REGION 7 



D. 25 Ahi-ens Trade 
Central 
Flaget 
St. Xavier 

Shawnee 



Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 



Alfred H. Meyer Thomas Bryant 

Atwood S. Wilson Edward Q. Adams 

Brother Cyi-il, C.F.X. Paul Miller 

Bro. Thomas More, C.F.X. Eugene Rhodes 
Robert B. Clem Jerome Keiffner 



D. 26 Atherton 
DeSales 
diiPont Manual 
Louisville Male 

D.27 Butler 
Durrett 
Fern Creek 
Southern 
Valley 



Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 

Shively 
Louisville 
Fern Creek 
Louisville 
Valley Station 



D. 28 Eastern Middletown 

Ky. Mili. Inst. Lyndon 

Ky. School for Blind Louisville 

Lou. Country Day Louisville 

Seneca Louisville 

Trinity Louisville 

Waggener Louisville 



Russell Garth 

Rev. Jude J. Catelona 

A. J. Ries 

W. S. Milbum 

H. L. Hatfield 
J. C. Bruce 
Willis K. Niman 
T. T. Knight 
J. C. Cantrell 

John W. Trapp 
N. C. Hodgin 
(Supt.) L. P. Houser 
H. F. Ludwig 
Kenneth B. Farmer 
Rev. A. W. Steinhauser 
John B. Lowe 



Wilms Kiefer 
James Swann 
James V. Casillo 
Guy Strong 

Lucian Moreman 
Donald Brooks 
Roy L. Winchester 
Clarence Smith 
Garland Garrison 

William Hoke 
W. T. Simpson 

Delmar Wallace 
Robert Muloahy 
Charles E. Quire 
Roy Adams 



REGION 8 



D. 29 Lebanon Junction 
Mt. Washington 
St. Aloysius 
St. Benedict 
Shepherdsville 

D. 30 Bagdad 

Lincoln Inst. 

Shelbyville 

Simpsonville 

Taylorsville 

Waddy 

D. 31 Campbellsburg 
Eminence 
Henry Central 
Oldham County 
Pleasureville 
Trimble County 

D.32 Carrollton 

Gallatin County 
Grant County 
Owen County 
Williamstown 



Lebanon Junction 
Mt. Washington 
Shepherdsville 
Lebanon Junction 
Shepherdsville 



Lincoln Ridge 

Shelbyville 

Simpsonville 

Taylorsville 

Waddy 

Campbellsburg 

Eminence 

New Castle 

LaGrange 

Pleasureville 

Bedford 

Carrollton 
Warsaw 
Dry Ridge 
Owenton 
Williamstovsm 



Thomas S. Jeffries 

C. L. Francis 
Sister M. Francelle 
Sister Aline Maria 
Willis G. Wells 

Jesse Lacefield 
Mrs. Kathlene Carroll 
Elmo C. Head 
Bruce Sweeney 
Harvey G. Bush 
W. R. Martin 

G. H. England 
(Supt.) William A. McKay 

D. P.. Parsley 
Roy H. Dorsey 
Robert Keen 
T. A. Parrish 

Palmore Lyles 
John M. Potter 
Ralph Blakey 
Cyrus E. Greene 
M. J. Belew 



Glenn B. Smith 
L. W. Mullins 
Harold Dawson 
Anthony Booth 
Denzil J. Ramsey 

Arnold Thurman 
Walter Gilliard 
Evan Settle 
Randal Pelfrey 
Bennie Mullins 
Bill Gordon 

Mitchell Bailey 
Jack Johnson 
Albert Prewitt 
Barney Thweatt 
Little Hale 
Ray Pigman 

Shirley Keams 
Charles Sutherland 
Delbert Walden 
Bill Smith 
Paul Watts 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1959 



Page Seven 



REGION 9 



School 

D. 33 Boone County 
Dixie Heig-hts 
Lloyd Memorial 
St. Henry 
Simon Kenton 
Walton-Verona 



Address 

Florence 

S. Ft. Mitchell 

Erlanger 

Erlanger 

Independence 

Walton 



D. 34 Beechwood S. Ft. Mitchell 

Covington Catholic Covington 

Holmes Covington 

Holy Cross Covington 

Ludlow Ludlow 

William Grant Covington 



D. 35 Bellevue 
Dayton 

Newport 
Newport Catholic 

D. 36 Campbell County 
Highlands 
St. Mary 
St. Thomas 
Silver Grove 



Bellevue 
Dayton 

Newport 
Newport 

Alexandria 
Ft. Thomas 
Alexandria 
Ft. Thomas 
Silver Grove 



D. 37 Cynthiana 
Georgetown 
Harrison County 
Scott County 

D. 38 Augusta 

Bi'acken County 

Butler 

Deming 

Falmouth 

Morgan 

D. 39 Fleming County 
May's Lick 
Maysville 
Minerva 
Orangeburg 
St. Patrick's 
Tollesiboro 

D. 40 Bourbon County 
Carlisle 

Millersburg Mill. In. 
Nicholas County 
North Middletown 
Paris 
Western 



Cynthiana 
Georgetown 
Cynthiana 
Georgetown 

Augusta 

Brooksville 

Butler 

Mt. Olivet 

Falmouth 

R. 2, Falmouth 

Flemingsburg 

May's Lick 

Maysville 

Minerva 

R. 3, Maysville 

Maysville 

Tollesboro 

Paris 

Carlisle 

Millersburg 

Carlisle 

North Middletown 

Paris 

Paris 



Principal 

Chester Goodridge 
Willard N. Shropshire 
James Tichenor 
Sister M. Clarita, O.S.B. 
R. C. Hinsdale 
Eugene Robinson 

Thelma W. Jones 
Bro. Julius May, S.M. 
H. T. Mitchell 
Sistei- M. Judith 
Arthur T. Tipton 
Charles Lett 

Donald Davis 
Kenneth Kuhnert 
James L. Cobb 
Rev. John C. Hegenauer 

Edward E. Ball 
Harold Miller 
Sister Mary Honora 
Sister Elizabeth Marie 
(Supt.) Tom L. Gabbard 

REGION 10 

Kelley B. Stanfield 
Roy Camic 
Joe H. Anderson 
Tony Raisor 

Alice Kate Field 
Jai-vis Parsley 
Reedus Back 
H. O. Hale 
(Supt.) L. H. Lutes 

Richard Gulick 

Arthur Cotterill 

Elza Whalen, Jr. 

Orville B. Hayes 

Shelby Mason 

W. B. Ray 

Sister M. Robert, O.S.F. 

Eugene Fox 

Joe E. Sabel 

Miss Nancy E. Talbert 

Robert L. Turner 

Alonzo Combs 

J. C. Falkenstine 

Milton 0. Traylor 

William B. Reed 



REGION 11 



D. 41 Frankfort 

Franklin County 
Good Shepherd 

D. 42 Anderson 
Burgin 
Harrodstoirrg 
Mercer County 
Midway 
Simmons 
Veirsailles 
Western 



Frankfort 
Frankfort 
Frankfort 

Lawrenceburg 

Buirgin 

Harrodsburg 

R. 5, Harrodsiburg 

Midway 

Versailles 

Versailles 

R. 1, Sinai 



F. D. Wilkinson 

Clyde L. Orr 

Sister Charles Benedict 

James D. Boyd 
Patrick E. Napier 
William D. Smart 
Albert L. Berry 
Alice Redden 
William J. Christy 
Charles Dawson 
Robert B. Turner 



Basketball Coach 

Duncan Huey 
Lewis Phillips 
Paul Champion 
James O'Connell 
Don Augsback 
C. M. Ewing 

Harold Williams 
Robert Naber 
Tom Ellis 
Frank R. Bezold 
Heulyn Bishop 
James Brock 

Roy McKenney 
George Houston 
Stanley Arnzen 
James Connor 

Lawrence Kinney 
Robert Luecke 
Rev. Paul Wolfzom 
Rev. Robert L. Gnaber 
Tom L. Gabbard 



Bobby Whitaker 
Harry Graham 
Kenton Campbell 
Robert Barlow 

Donald Barker 
Jarvis Paa-sley 
Dwight L. Wolfe 
H. 0. Hale 
Cecil Hellard 
Richard Gulick 

Clay Evans 

Jesse Amburgey 

Woodrow Crum 

Bob Hall 

W. B. Ray 

Rev. Joseph A. Browne 

Woodrow Toole 

Fred Reece 
Gayle Bo wen 
Herman Bolin 
Gerry Calvert 
Fi-ed Creasey 
Charles Straub 
William B. Reed 



Homer Bickers 
Charles Mrazovich 
Charles F^rr 

James D. Boyd 
Billy D. Marshall 
Forest Sale 
Amos Black 
Ed Allin 
Charles Lee 
James McAfee 
Monty Singleton 



Page Eight 


THE KENT 


UCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLEl 


^E FOR JANUARY, 1959 


School 


Address 


Principal 


Basketball Coach 


D. 43 Bryan Station 


Lexington 


R. L. Grider 


J. R. Abney 


Doug-lass 


Lexington 


Mrs. Theda VanLowe 


Charles Livisay 


Heni-jf Clay 


Lexington 


Clyde T. Lassiter 


Elmer T. Gilb 


Jessamine County 


Nicholas\'ille 


Billy Lockridge 


William Maxwell 


Lafayette 


Lexing-ton 


Dr. H. L. Davis 


Ralph Cai-lisle 


Lexington Catholic 


Lexington 


Rev. Leo G. Kampsen 


Fred O'Brien 


P. L. Dunbai- 


Lexington 


P. L. Guthrie 


S. T. Roach 


Rosenwald Dunbar 


Nicholasville 


Edward D. Taylor 


Leonard J. Cavil 


University 


Lexington 


Dr. Erwin H. Sasman 


Eugene Huff 


D. 44 Berea 


Berea 


Mable E. Todd 


Jim Mitchell 


Estill County 


Irvine 


Luther Patrick 


Rodney Brewer 


Foundation 


Berea 


Roy N. Walters 


Douglas Massey 


Irvine 


Irvine 


Joe Ohr 


Joe Ohr 


Madison Central 


R. 5, Richmond 


J. B. Moore 


Russell Roberts 


Madison-Model 


Richmond 


T. L. Arterberry 

REGION 12 


Zeb Blankenship 


D. 45 Bate 


Danville 


William Summers 


Ozenia Hawkins 


Buckeye 


R. 3, Lancaster 


W. R. Duerson 


W. R. Duerson 


Cp. Dick Robinson 


R. 5, Lancaster 


W. R. Tudor 


Howard Foley 


Danville 


Danville 


Don R. Rawlings 


Leon Kingsolver 


Forkland 


R. 1, Gravel Switch Donald G. Lamb 


Donald G. Lamb 


Junction City 


Junction City 


Earl Cocanougher 


Roy Allison 


Lancaster 


Lancaster 


Stanley Marsee 


Leslie C. Dyehouse 


Mason 


Lancaster 


Mrs. Tommie F. Men-itt 


Clay E. Palmer 


Paint Lick 


Paint Lick 


Mrs. Fay Ward Little 


Harold Mui-phy 


Parks ville 


Parksville 


Joseph E. Wesley 


Hillard Combs 


Perryville 


Perryville 


Garland Purdom 


Lee Thomas Mills 


D.46 Brodhead 


Brodhead 


D. A. Robbins 


Billy Riddle 


Crab Orchard 


Crab Orchard 


L. A. Wash 


Edward 0. Reece 


Hustonville 


Hustonville 


Cecil Purdom 


Jack Johnson 


Liberty 


Liberty 


Stanley Bryant 


Wm. Patrick Tiilly 


Lincoln 


Stanford 


G. W. Parks 


Lantis Stewart 


Livingston 


Livingston 


Charles B. Parsons 


Preston Parrett 


KcKinney 


McKinney 


M. C. Montgomery 


Lloyd Gooch 


Memorial 


AVaynesburg 


Lawrence Hale 


Doyle McGuffey 


Middleburg 


Middlesburg 


Nathaniel Buis 


Truman Godby 


Mt. Vernon 


Mt. Vernon 


William Landrum 


Jack L. Laswell 


Stanford 


Stanford 


J. C. Eddleman 


James Fai-ley 


D. 47 Burnside 


Burnside 


Hobert Branscom 


Herbert Childers 


Eubank 


Eubank 


J. B. Albright 


Beldy Massey 


Ferguson 


FergTison 


Howard Taft Moore 


Perry Childers 


McCreary County 


Whitley City 


Martin Marlar 


Joe S. Williams 


Monticello 


Monticello 


(Supt.) Robert E. Woosley 


Joe W. Harper 


Nancy 


Nancy 


Herbert T. Higgins 


M. A. Warner 


Pine Knot 


Pine Knot 


Mrs. C. D. Harmon 


Howai-d Jones 


Pulaski County 


Somerset 


Edward B. Webb 


Robert Randall 


Russell County 


Russell Springs 


Norman Antle 


James Bingham 


Shopville 


Shopville 


Raymond Combs 


Jim Jones 


Somerset 


Somerset 


W. B. Jones 


Ed Tucker 


Stearns 


Stearns 


C. W. Hume 


Joel C. Boyer 


Wayne County 


Monticello 


A. J. Lloyd 


Ray Mills 


D. 48 Bush 


Lida 


C. Frank Bentley 


Claude McKnight 


Hazel Green 


East Bemstadt 


Clark E. Chesnut 


Holbei-t Hodges 


Lily 


Lily 


R. S. Baldwin 


Harold Storm 


London 


London 


Leighton Watkins 

REGION 13 


Howard Corder 


D. 49 Annville Institute 


Annville 


Roland J. Simmeling 


Jerry Hacker 


Clay County 


Manchester 


Robert Campbell 


J. W. Thurman 


McKee 


McKee 


Kermit C. Bowman 


Charles E. Norris 


Oneida Institute 


Oneida 


David C. Jackson 


Joe Tom Gregory 


Tyner 


Tyner 


James W. Wilson 


Jack Powell 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1959 



Page Nine 



School 
D. 50 Barbourville 
Carbin 

Knox Central 
Lynn Camp 
Pleasant View 
Poplar Creek 
Rockholds 
Rosenwald 
St. Camillus Acad. 
Williamsbui-g' 
Woodbine 

D.51 Bell County 

Hendei-son Settle. 

Lincoln 

Lone Jack 

Middlesboix) 

Pineville 

Red Bird 
D. 52 Benham 

Black Star 

Cumberland 

East Benliam 

East Main Street 

Evarts 

Hall 

Harlan 

Loyall 

Rosenwald 

Wallins 

West Main Street 



Address 

Barbourville 

Corbin 

Barbourville 

Corbin 

Pleasant View 

Carpenter 

Rockholds 

Barbourville 

Corbin 

Williamsburg 

Woodbine 

Pineville 

Frakes 

Middlesboro 

Four Mile 

Middlesboro 

Pineville 

Beverly 

Benham 

Alva, 

Cumberland 

Benham 

Lynch 

Evarts 

Grays Knob 

Harlan 

Loyall 

Hai'lan 

Wallins 

Lynch 



D. 53 Dunham 

Fleming-Neon 
Jenkins 

Kingdom Come 
Letcher 
Whitesburg 

D. 54 Buckhom 

Combs Memorial 
Hazard 
Leatherwood 
Leslie County 
M. C. Napier 
Stinnett Settle. 

D. 55 Breathitt 

Carr Creek 
Cordia 
Hindman 
Jackson 
Knott County 
Magoffin Bapt. Inst. 

D. 56 Hazel Green Acad. 
Lee County 
Owsley County 
Powell County 
Wolfe County 

D.57 Belfry 
Dorton 
Elkhom City 
Peds Creek 
Hellier 
Johns Creek 
Mullins 
Phelps 
Pikeville 
Virgie 



Jenkins 

Fleming 

Jenkins 

Linefork 

Letcher 

Whitesburg 

Buckhom 

Jeff 

Hazard 

Slemp 

Hyden 

Darfork 

Hoskinston 

Jackson 

Carr Creek 

R. 2, Hazard 

Hindman 

Jackson 

Pippa Passes 

Mountain Valley 

Hazel Green 

Beattyville 

Booneville 

Stanton 

Campton 

Belfry 

Dorton 

Elkhorn City 

Feds Creek 

Hellier 

R. 1, Pikeville 

R. 1, Pikeville 

Phelps 

Pikeville 

Virgie 



Principal 

(Supt.) Charles Singleton 
H. A. Howard 
Clinton B. Hammons 
P. M. Broughton 
George E. Moses 
Jack C. Foley 
John PeiTy 
Albei-t L. Gregory 
Sr. Antoinette Marie 
H. B. Steely 
Oonvil Clouse 
James A. Pursifull 
C. E. Calloway 
Miss E. R. Ball 
Chester L. CHck 
Shelvie Fuson 
Effie Amett 
P. P. Estridge 
James H. Powell 
William L. Mills 
Kendall Boggs 
J. A. Matthews 
Sam Potter 
Claude R. Dozier 
Charles R. Steele 
Roy G. Teague 
Lee P. Jones 
William M. Wood 
John H. Howard 
John V. Coleman 

REGION 14 

G. V. Curi-y 
Roy T. Reasor 
Dave L. Craft 
Ruben Watts 
Jeff B. Mayes 
J. M. Burkich 
Marshall Colwell 
Grazia K. Combs 
H. M. Wesley 
Bingham Brashear 
Roscoe Turner 
Vernon Minnard 
W. R. Sizemore 
Millard Tolliver 
Morton Combs 
Alice H. Slone 
Claude Frady 
Orloff L. Knarr 
Edward Madden 
Robert S. Murphy 
Mrs. Henry A. Stoviall 
Blaine C. Martin 
W. O. Gabbard 
H. G. Pennycuff 
A. M. Richie 

REGION 15 

W. F. Doane 
Charles E. Morgan 
James V. Powell 
Nelsion Hamilton, Jr. 
William M. Justice 
Quentin R. Howard 
Landon Hunt 
Charles Elswick 
Clj'de Senters 
Fred W. Cox 



Basketball Coach 

H. D. Tye 
Harry J. Taylor 
Harold Cole 
Kenneth Hockler 
Earl Centers 
Tony McKiddy 
Gray Bi-oyles 
Albert L. Gregory 
Rev. Tyrell Keller 
J. B. Mountjoy 
Wan-en Peace 
Willie Hendrickson 
Darell Pursifull 
A. M. McKinney 
G. B. Hendrickson 
James Summers 
Oi-ville Engle 
Raymond W. Shilt 
Charles A. Davis 
James Burkhart 
Fred Parsons 
Emmett Broadus 
Ed Miracle 
Charles Hunter 
Joe Campbell 
Joe Gilly 
N. Baylor 
E. R. Gray 
James L. Howard 
Eugene Traylor 



Wendell H. Lewis 
John Washco 
Rex Chaney 
Cobern Ison 
H. E. Wright 
Don Burton 
Fred Johnson 
Roscoe Shackelford 
Goebel Ritter 
F. Delano Combs 
Basclim Fawbush 
Pete Grigsby 
Jack Maggard 
Fairce O. Woods 
Morton Combs 
George W. Comett 
Pearl Combs 
J. B. Goff 
Edward Madden 

William Day 

Harold Eugene Flynn 

John Seale 

Bill Orme 

Roger Johnson 

Jim Hutchins 
Monroe Hall 
Arthur Mullins 
W. S. Risner 
Jack Castle 
Glen McDowell 
Gary D. Layne 
John Cromer 
John B. Trivette 
Virgil Osborne 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1959 



School 

D. 58 Auxier 

Betsy Layne 

Garrett 

McDowell 

Martin 

Maytown 

Prestonsburg 

Wayland 

Wheelwright 



Address 

Auxier 

Betsy Layne 

Garrett 

McDowell 

Martin 

Langley 

Prestonsburg 

Wayland 

Wheelwi-ight 



Principal 

John C. Wells 
D. W. Howard 
Charles Clark 
George L. Moore 
J. W. Salisbury 
Burnice Gearheart 
James V. Bolen 
Lawrence B. Price 
Boone Hall 



Basketball Coach 

Jack F. Wells 
Thomas Boyd 
John Campbell, Jr. 
Estill Hall 
Denzil Halbert 
Ray Heinisch 
Bill Goble, Jr. 
Lois E. Erasure 
Don Wallen 



D. 59 Blaine 

Flat Gap 

Inez 

Louisa 

Meade Memorial 

Paintsville 

Van Lear 

Warfield 



Blaine 
Flat Gap 
Inez 
Louisa 
Williamsport 
Paintsville 
Van Lear 
Warfield 



Paul H. Gambill 
Virgil Porter 
Russell Williamson 
J. I. Cheek 
Russell Boyd 
Billy Lee Conley 
Hysell Burchett 
Russell H. Stepp 



Paul H. Gambill 
F. S. Stapleton 
U. G. Horn 
Billy Ray Cassady 
Howard W. Wallen 
Jim Wheeler 
Howard Ramey 
John C. Marcum 



D. 60 Ezel 

Morgan County 
Oil Springs 
Salyersville 
Sandy Hook 



Ezel 

West Liberty 

Oil Springs 

Salyersville 

Sandy Hook 



William A. Heagen 
Lloyd E. Patterson 
Willis H. Conley 
Creed Arnett 
Roy Lewis 



William A. Heagen 
Neil Hunley 
Howard Yates 
Leonard Marshall 
Len Stiner 



REGION 16 



D. 61 Camargo R. 2, Mt. Sterling 

Clark County Winchester 

Dubois Mt. Sterling 

Menifee County Frenchburg 

Montgomery County Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Sterling Mt. Sterling 

St. Agatha Acad Winchester 

Winchester Winchester 



J. B. Cunningham 
Letcher Norton 
Arthur R. Hawkins 
Ora Watts 
John C. Stringer 
Dawson Orman 
Sister Caroline Mary 
Miss Eunice Haggard 



Julian R. Cunningham 
Letcher Norton 
William Elster 
Harry Howard 
Eugene Clark 
James Floyd 
Father Theo. Keller 
Alex Stevens 



D. 61 Breckinridge Trng. Morehead 

Haldeman Haldeman 

Owingsville Owingsville 

Rowan County Morehead 

Sharpsburg Sharpsburg 



James M. Howard 
James O. Botts 
Edsel L. Karrick 
Calvin Hunt 
Glynn B. Baucom 



John E. Allen 
Jack Roberts 
Donnie Gaunce 
Warren Cooper 
Tom M. Evans 



D. 63 Carter Carter 

Hitchins Hitchins 

Laurel Camp Dix 

Olive Hill Olive Hill 

Prichard Grayson 

V-burg-Lewis Co. Vanceburg 



Thomas E. Phillips 
Harold H. King 
William A. Carver 
Hayden Parker 
Max E. Calhoun 
Teddy Applegate 



John R. Hartig 
Paul Hamilton 
Jack Fultz 
Harold Holbrook 
Robert Wright 



D. 64 Ashland 

B. T. Washington 

Boyd County 

Catlettsburg 

Fairview 

Greenup 

Holy Family 

McKell 

Raceland 

Russell 

South Portsmouth 

Wurtland 



Ashland 

Ashland 

Ashland 

Catlettsburg 

Ashland 

Greenup 

Ashland 

South Shore 

Raceland 

Russell 

South Portsmouth 

Wurtland 



H. L. Ellis 
C. B. Nuckolls 
Webb Young 
Frank C. Burns 
John H. Holbrook, Jr. 
Ann M. Sammons 
Sr. M. Barbara, CO. P. 
Cliff Lowdenback 
Denver Ball 
Frank C. Firestine 
(Supt.) Foster Meade 
Stanley Ramey 



Fred Anson 
W. A. West 
Delmis Donta 
Dale Craycraft 
Paul Tesla 
H. R. Bowling 
Jack Gosisett 
Ben Webb 
Ronnie Potter 
Marvin Meredith 
Ed Moore 
Fred Smith 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1959 



Page Eleven 



The Flying Dutchman 

Foster "Sid" Meade has made a contribu- 
tion to the Flying Dutchman's collection of 
poems. It is a good one to start the New Year. 
Here it is: 

"His was a smile men loved to see 
His was a hand that asked no fee 
For friendliness or kindness done 
And now that he has journeyed on 
His is the fame that never ends 
He leaves behind uncounted friends." 
Sid, who possesses an enviable state-wide 
reputation for his basketball officiating, is 
quite a philosopher. His poem illustrates the 
principles of the Com Cob Pipe Award, the 
Abou Ben Adhem citation, and the Game 
Guy recognitions. No man has ever risen to 
the real stature of spiritual manhood until 
he has found that it is finer to serve some- 
one else than it is to serve himself. 

Such stature has been attained by Doctor 
Claude Allen who is hailed at the Beaver 
Valley Hospital at Martin as one of "Nature's 
Noblemen." Coach Ray Heinisch of Maytown 
High School has called for a Corn Cob Pipe 
to be awarded to Doctor Allen. According to 
Ray, Doctor Allen is loved by all of the 
young people of his mountain abode and he 
has a unique record of service to them. 

When athletes are sick or have accidents 
they make bee lines to Doctor Claude's door. 
He examines athletes by the dozens, always 
rendering this service free. In addition he is 
giving constant treatment to unfortunate 
athletes not covered by accident insurance. 
Besides being an ardent "Wildcat" fan he is 
a community leader par excellence. If you 
want to find a Maytown team after a game, 
it is a cinch that the boys can be located at 
a "big feed" at the Doctor's house. The Com 
Cob Pipe of Honor is on its way to this 
grand Kentuckian, Doctor Claude Allen. 

Ralph Welch, Louisville's up and coming 
basketball official, qualified Principal L. H. 
Anthony and Coach Mike Speck of Willis- 
burg High School for an Abou Ben Adhem 
citation for their school. Although Willis- 
burg has gone three years without a victory 
on the hardwood, that school's treatment of 
officials is outstanding. Officials are served 
sandwiches, fruit, and drinks at the con- 
tests. Such sportsmanship, in the face of 
adversity, indicates again why Kentucky is 
regarded as the Sportsmanship Capitol of 
the nation. 

The Flying Dutchman takes issue with 





Dr. Claude Allen 

those who jokingly refer to a losing coach as 
one who is spending his time in character 
building. If this were true it would be our 
recommendation that all coaches work for 
losses rather than victories. Win or lose 
character must be built. It is a reflection 
on sound philosophy and Christian conduct 
that some people would rather have a good 
reputation than a good character. Character 
is where character is developed. The re- 
sponsibility of a coach is first to develop 
character, second to produce champions. 

Al Gustafson must have had character- 
building in mind when he recommended Har- 
din McLane of EUzabethtovni Catholic High 
School for a Corn Cob Pipe of Honor Award. 
According to Al, Coach McLane teaches tol- 
eration and courtesy to his boys and treats 
every official as a guest. If you are an of- 
ficial you have a standing invitation from 
Coach Mac to attend any of Elizabethtown 
Catholic's home basketball games as a guest 
of the school. Certainly such a gentleman 
qualifies for the Dutchman's Cob Pipe Award. 

More and more basketball officials' associa- 
tions are coming into existance. Within the 
next five years Kentucky will probably have 
an association in every county of the Com- 
monwealth. The Jackson Purchase Referees' 
Association, sparked by Joe Fields, is doing 
an outstanding job in its area. Joe is giving 
promises of becoming one of the state's lead- 
ers in the officiating realm. 

From Kean Jenkins, Recreation Director 
of Elizabethtown and sports official, comes 
the recommendation of Don Hamed for the 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1959 



game guy award of 1958-59. According to 
Kean this young man is sixteen years old, 
a student at Elizabethtown Catholic High 
School, with a handicap. One leg is about 
one-fifth the size of the other. He is a mem- 
ber of the basketball team playing regularly 
with the Junior varsity. He plays in the 
Babe Ruth Baseball League, pitching a no- 
hit game on the Fourth of July against 
Lebanon Junction. The Lapel Button is on 
its way to Don. 

Are you interested in starting off the 
New Year with a new occupation? The field 
of recreation is expanding rapidly in Ken- 
tucky and presently Spencer County is or- 
ganizing a full-time program of public re- 
creation. Right now Doctor Tom Follis of 
Taylorsville is looking for a recreation super- 
intendent who can handle Spencer County's 
program. Contact Doctor Tom if you would 
like to dedicate yourself to public service in 
the field of wholesome recreation. 

As we close out the old year and look for- 
ward to 1959, the Dutchman thanks all of 
you for many things but most of all he is 
grateful for your friendship. 



CONFERENCE STANDINGS 

(Continued ivom Inside Front Cover) 

Southeastern Kentucky Conference 



Corbin 


6 








30.00 


Williamsburg: 


5 


1 


1 


25.80 


Knox Central 


5 


1 


1 


19.60 


Middlesboro 


5 


2 


1 


19.40 


Harlan 


3 


3 





17.50 


London 


1 


1 





16.90 


Bell County 


3 


5 


1 


15.00 


Pineville 


2 


6 





12.50 


Barboui-ville 


1 


5 


1 


12.10 


Lynn Camp 





6 


1 


10.70 


Hazel Green 





1 


1 


10.00 


Western Kentucky Athletic 


Conference 


Caldwell County 


8 





1 


25.42 


Owensboro 


6 


1 





23.33 


Henderson 


6 


3 


1 


23.76 


Madisonville 


8 


2 





21.67 


Hopkinsville 


7 


2 





21.67 


Morganfield 


8 


2 





18.89 


Daviess County 


4 


3 


1 


17.50 


Russellville 


6 


3 





16.88 


Murray 


4 


4 





16.25 


Owensboro Catholic 


3 


4 





15.00 


Sturgis 


5 


5 


1 


14.54 


Mayfield 


4 


4 


1 


14.29 


Trigg County 


3 


6 


1 


14.00 


Bowling Green 


2 


6 





13.75 


Fulton 


1 


3 





12.50 


Providence 





7 


1 


11.88 


Henderson County 


1 


9 





11.50 


Crittenden County 





9 





10.00 


Franklin Simpson 





7 





10.00 



Barren River Eight-Man Conference 

Ends: Edwards, Hiseville; Moore, Cavema. 

Guards: Thompson, Temple Hill; Bastin, Ca- 
verna. 

Center: Driver, Temple Hill. 

Backs: Doyle, Caverna; Long and Cox, Hiseville. 
Bluegrass Eight-Man Conference 

Linemen: Coleman, Spencer and Foley of 
Berea; Hundley, Engle and Jackson of Pen-yville; 
Tudor, Paint Lick; Yates, Oamp Dick Robinson; 
Campbell, Burgin; Stepp, Mt. Vernon; Woods, 
Eminence. 

Backs: Milbui-n and Warren of Perryville; 
Hammonds and Davidson of Berea; DeShon, Camp 
Dick Robinson, Nunnelly, Mt. Vernon; Woods, 
Paint Lick. 

Central Kentucky Conference 

Linemen: Baker, Somerset; Biancke, Cynthiana; 
Brooks, Winchester; Brown, Shelbyville; Cox, Lan- 
caster; Deweese, Paris; Hai-tei', Winchester; Mc- 
Ginnis, Shelbyville; Moser, Stanford; Padgett, Ver- 
sailles; Penn, Versailles; Smith, Madison; Waddle, 
Somerset; Walker, Madison. 

Backs: Hines, Somerset; Naylor, Stanford; 
Owens, Harrodsburg; Pieratt, Mt. Sterling; Tuck- 
er, Versailles; Veal, Jessamine County; Witt, 
Irvine; Woolum, Madison. 

Cumberland Valley Conference 

Ends: James, Benham; Kilgore, Wallins. 

Tackles: Roaden, Black Star; Clore, Benham. 

Guards: Burkhart, Loyall; Bowman, Cumber- 
land; Keller, Hall. 

Center: Evans, Lynch. 

Backs: Mayfield, Black Star; Creech, Wallins; 
Blake, Cumberland; Simps'on, Benham. 

Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference 
Offensive Team: 

Ends: Baird, Pikeville; Slusher, Fleming'-Neon. 

Tackles: Brush, Jenkins; Retry, Hazard. 

Guards: Ooten, Belfry; Phillips, Pikeville. 

Center: Hamilton, Paintsville. 

Backs: Sizemore, Hazard; Allen, Prestonsburg; 
Minix, Paintsville; Sykes, Elkhorn City. 
Defensive Team : 

Ends: Layne, M. C. Napieir; Haliburton, Hazard. 

Tackles: Coleman, Elkhorn City; Chandler, 
Jenkins. 

Guards: Rains, Fleming-Neon; Hughes, F¥es- 
tonsburg. 

Center: Venters, Pikeville. 

Backs: Handy and Cobb of Hazard; Mims, 
Pikeville; Wiley, Paintsville. 

Mid-Kentucky Conference 

Ends: Kimberlin, Springfield; Garmon, Glasgow. 

Tackles: Christopher, Elizabethtown; Hibbs, 
Old Kentucky Home; Holtz, Saint Joseph. 

Guards: Hall, Springfield; Kirk, Elizabethtown. 

Centei': Colvin, Bardstown. 

Backs: Carrico, St. Joseph; Ross, Glasgow; 
Jenkins, Elizabethtown; Shaw, Ft. Knox. 
Northeastern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Offensive: Lee, Rice and Ferguson of Catletts- 
burg; J. Maynard, Willman and W. Maynard of 
Louisa; Davidson and Greenslait of Raceland; Ham- 
ilton, McKell; Brown, Russell; Gumbert, Wmtland. 

Defensive: McWain, Robinson, and Jordan of 
Catlettsburg; Meade, Dotson and Tackett of Louisa; 
Mills and Fuller of Raceland; Callahan, McKell; 
Mullins, Russell; Bradford, Wurtland. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1959 



Page Thirteen 



Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Ends: Hudepohl, Highlands; West, Campbell 
County; Pentecost, Dixie Heights; Gross, Newport. 

Tackles: Points, Newport; Finneseth, High- 
land's; Hanson, Bellevue; Hensen, Boone County. 

Guards: Huff, Dixie Heights; Lee, Highlands; 
Lewis, Holmes; Simpson, Lloyd. 

Centers: Wallace, Newpoi-t; Kibler, Highlands. 

Backs: Emmons, Highlands; Gosney, Campbell 
County; Ward, Dixie Heights; Mosley, Highlands; 
Carr, Campbell County; Parton, Dixie Heig'hts; 
Hoepher, Dayton; Goodhew, Holmes; Burt, High- 
lands. 

Southeastern Kentucky Conference 

Ends: Hutson, Corbin; Goins, Middlesboro. 

Tackles: Rader, Corbin; W. Conner, Middles- 
boro. 

Guards: J. Conner, Middlesboro; Reynolds, 
Williamsburg. 

Center: Ball, Middlesboro. 

Backs: RobbinS', Bell County; Johnson, Pine- 
ville; Brennenstohl, Williamsburg; Nagle, Middles- 
boro. 

Western Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Ends: Kenady, Caldwell County; Wright, Madi- 
sonville; Elliott, Morganfield; Mutchler, Paducah; 
Newcom, Sturgis. 

Tackles: Bates aind Curlin of Caldwell County; 
Poole, Madisonville; Estes, Henderson. 

Guards: Boyd, Hopkinsville; Brown, Morgan- 
field; Woodall, Crittenden County; Butler, Madison- 
ville. 

Centers: Brown, Owensboro; Hopper, Caldwell 
County. 

Backs: Mitchell, Caldwell County; Anderson, 
Owensboro; Steward, Morganfield; Brewer, Murray; 
McGee, Hopkinsville; Everly, Providence; Heffing- 
toin, Ti-igg County; Glover, Henderson. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled January 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
tlie home phone number unless otherwise desigrnated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Alexander. Boyd S., Leitohfield. CI 2-2121, 9 

Alstadt, C. J., Jr.. 721 Bryan Rd., Evansville. Indiana, 

HA 2-2111, HA 5-9651 
Baker, Fred, Route 5, Box 86, London 
Barron, Patrick, 836 First. Henderson, VA 6-4279 
Barter, William F., Apt. 22-B, Ft. Campbell, GE 9-4641, 2693 
Belcher, Elster E., Pine Ave., Elkhorn Citv 

Bojako. Robert F., Co. "D" 502 Inf., Ft. Campbell, 3708, 3708 
Carrithers, Calvin L. "Bill", 1813 MillKate Rd.. Box 358, 

Et. 4. AnchoraEe. CH 5-0061, CH 5-4161 
Chambers, Bill M., 6329' Aracoma Road, Huntington. W. Va. 
Chandler, Jim Thomas, Glenn Ave., Shelbyville, 1228-W 
Clary, Kenneth, 7 Pope St.. Henderson, 7-1071 
Collins, Hubert, Riceville 
Combs, Walter H., 2736 Avenel Ave,, S. W., Roanoke, Va., 

DI 2-2325. DI 4-1411 
Dailey. William R., 281 Lyndhurst Place. Lexington, 5-3011 
Dame, L. J., 604 Ridgewood. Owensboro. MU 4-5681 
Danner. James N., 3706 Maplewood Dr.. Amelia, Ohio. SK 3-5549 
Dennedy, T. Robert. 352 Van Voast. Bellevue. CO 1-9777, 

PA 1-2700, Service Dent. 
Dixie. Cornelius, 608 So. Clay, Louisville. JTJ 7-7680. EM 6-9561 
Dixon. Kenneth, 268 Turner Ave., Irvine, 471-J 
Farley, Jimmy. Trailer 7-B, Vets Village. Richmond 
Feher, A. J.. P. O. Box 807, Cumberland, 6-J, Lvnch 5431 
Feix, Al, 250 E. 14th St., Bowling Green, Victor 3-6586, 

Victor 3-6586 
Fey, Allen, 123 Garden Way, Ft. Thomas, HI 1-6288, KI 1-1800, 

Ext. 1448 
Flege, Robert D., Charlotte Heights, Williamstown, TA 3-4871, 

CO 1-2860 
Fort, John W„ Pleasant View, Tenn., SH 6-3455, SH 6-5251 
Gant, W. G., 229 W. Fairview Rd.. Oak Ridge, Tenn.. 6-4775 
Gillespie, Robert C, No. 8 Wilana Ct., Pikeville, 7-7934, 7-7190 



Hiseville Unofficial Champion 

Although the K,H,S.A.A. to date has not estab- 
lished an official championship in eig-ht-man foot- 
ball, there is little doubt but that the Hiseville foot- 
ball team was Kentucky's best in the eight-man 
sport during the season just ended. Hiseville won 
the championsihip of the Barren River Eight-Man 
Conference with a record of 8-0, and Perryville was 
the champion of the Bluegrass Eight-Man Confer- 
ence with a 7-0 record. On November 8, 1958, the 
two conference champions met at Glasgow for a 
g'ame which was billed as the championship game 
for the state. The site was the Ralph Hammer 
Stadium. Hiseville won by the decisive score of 
32-7. 

Correction 

Due to an error, the names of the St. Joseph Prep. 
football players in the front row of the picture 
which appeared in the December issue of the 
ATHLETE were listed incorrectly. The correct 
names of the boys should have been as follows, 
reading left to right: Barber, Cecil, Holtz, Peake, 
S'oheffler, Hackney, Cissel, Rogers, Weidlocker, 
Kurtz, Gault and Peters. 



Harrod. Edmond, Route 4. Frankfort, CA 3-0268 

Hoh, John J., 30 Pleasant Ridge Ave.. S. Ft. Mitchell. Ed 1-1860 

Hook, Burnley B., Route 5, Paducah, 34610, 24311 

Howard, Samuel A., 59-D Wherry, Ft. Campbell, GE 9-4664, 

FC 4482 
Jordan, Arthur C, Jr., 526 Dalton, Owensboro 
Kays, Herbie S., Route 5, Shelbyville, 1475, Georgetown College 

735 
Kilgore, Danny, UK-Kinkead Hall, Box 4424, Lexington 
Lamb, Billy. P. O. Box 232, Junction City, 3950 
Lamphere. R. G., 2568 Clay St., Paducah, 5-7442, 2-2726 
Litke, Walter, College Heights Post Office, Bowling Green 
Lykins, Joe D., Malone, SH 3-4340 

McBride, Donald R.. 1663 Strader Dr.. Lexington, 5-2153 
Maner, Charles J., Box 14, Longacre. W. Va. 
Marcle, John, Williamson High School, Williamson. W. Va. 
Mattingly, Charles Bernard, P. O. Box 183, Cloverport, 

SU 3308, SU 8-3741 
Miller, SGT. Kenneth H., 4149 E. Gaffey Hts.. Ft. Knox, 

4213 (Bus. No.) 
Millerhaus, Bill, 923 Harris Ave.. Cincinnati. Ohio 
Muncy, C. P., 413 Daniels Addition, Ravenna, 493-W 
Newman, Bill, 2535 Ritchie, Portsmouth, Ohio. Elmwood 3-6257 
Parrott, Lanny L., Box 36, Campbellsville 
Pickens, Jim, 810 Alton Rd., Danville. 557-J. 708 
Pierce, John W., Route 2, Corydon, VA 6-9816 
Prall, John A., Box 632, Eastern State College. Richmond 
Rakel. Roland G.. 8512 Donegal Dr.. Cincinnati 36, Ohio, 

SY 1-1662, MA 1-9600 
Reece, Larry Hayden, Route 2, Canmer, LA 8-2552 
Reed, Grant. Jr.. Lily, VO 4-4403 
Reschar. John V., 890 Eastern Pkwy.. Louisville 
Rozen, Morris. Richmond. 1859-W, 2038 

Rubenstein, Sherwin. 113 W. 6th St., Williamson, W. Va. 
Simmons. Ronald F., 150 Maple Ave., Danville, 2046 
Smith, Samuel V.. 1314 W. 15th. Owensboro. MU 4-5478, 

MU 4-3269 
Snowden, Lewis R.. Route 2. Henderson. V 7-5855 
Stidham, Jennis, Transylvania College. Box 125. Lexington, 

4-4260 
Stone, Clifton. 2930 Oak Hill Rd.. Evansville, Indiana, 

Gr 6-0973 
Tarlton, Thomas O., 200 Southland Blvd., Louisville, EM 6-3233 
Thomas, Harold E., 74S1-B 10th Tank Bn. St., Ft. Knox, 

5860. 6718 
Trow, SFC Jack B., 155-H Wherry, Ft. Campbell 
Tully. Pat. P. O. Box 641. Liberty. SU 7-4881. SU 7-3942 
Wallen, Edgar, 2901V. Central. Ashland. EA 4-8638. EA 4-3177 
Williams. Benny D.. Route 3. Philpot. PA 9-4566 
Woosley. Harrv L.. 123 E. Main St.. Leitchfield. 326-J. 8 
Woratschek, John N.. MCA 3045-B. Ft. Campbell. 3867. 3708 
Wright. Logan. 412 W. 17th, Hopkinsville, TU 6-6123. TU 5-5381 
Yelton, Gene, Brooksville, RE 5-2328 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1959 



Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the K.H.S.A.A. met 
at the K.H.S.A.A. building, Lexington, on Satur- 
day morning, December 20, 1958. The meeting was 
called to order by President Russell Williamson at 
9:30, with all Board members. Commissioner Theo. 
A. Sanf ord„ and Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mans- 
field present. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by Jack Daw- 
son, that the reading of the minutes of the October 
11th meeting be waived, since the members of the 
Board had received copies of these minutes. The 
motion was can-ied unanimously. 

W. B. Jones, Chairman of the Trophy Com- 
mittee, reported that the Committee had met in 
the K.H.S.A.A. office at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, 
December 6, at which time the sealed bids for the 
1959 district and regional basketball tournament 
trophies were opened. Mr. Jones reported that the 
Committee had accepted the low bid of $27.95, made 
by the Sutcliffe Company,, for each set of thei 
necessary sixty-four sets of 1959 basketball tourna- 
ment trophies to be used in the district toiirnaments, 
and the low bid of $30.25 per set, made by the 
Sport Shop of Glasgow, Kentucky, for sixteen sets 
of the 1959 regional basketball trophies. Mr. Jones 
moved, seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, that the action 
of the Committee be approved by the Board. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

W. H. Crowdus, Chairman of the Football 
Championship Committee, presented a pix)posed 
division of schools into Class A, Class AA, and 
Class AAA regions for football play-offs to be con- 
ducted in 1959. He stated that the Committee 
further recommended that the minimum number 
of games to be played by a team with other teams 
in its reg-ion, in order for it to qualify for a reg- 
ional championship, be changed from five to four. 
K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by Robert P. For- 
sythe, that the recommendations of the Football 
Championship Committee be accepted and put into 
effect. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner gave a report on the recent 
sui-vey he had conducted concerning the certifi- 
cation and duties of K.H.S.A.A. coaches. He stated 
that some twelve or fifteen member schools were 
apparently not complying completely with the pro- 
visions of K.H.S.A.A.. By-Law 30, which states that 
the coach of a team shall be a duly certificated mem- 
ber of the school faculty. In some instances the re- 
quired certificates had not been secured, and in other 
instances the coaches had very few assigned duties 
during the school day. W. B. Jones moved, seconded 
by K. G. Gillaspie, that the Commdssiotner notify 
the principals of schools not cui-rently complying 
with the provisions of By-Law 30, with the warning 
that full compliance must be made by the 1959-1960 
school year. The motion was caiTied unanimously. 

The Commissioner presented the following 
recommendations of the State Swimming Commit- 
tee, to be put into effect for the 1959 State Swim- 
ming Meet: 1) eliminate the provision foi- a school 
being allowed to enter its swimming team in a 
lower class than the one in which its enrollment 
places the sschool, during its first year of com- 
petition; 2) allow a competitor to enter only two 
events, including diving, this applying to all 
classes; 3) provide the same type of medals and 
trophies for all classes; 4) set the date for the 
Class A State Swimming Meet for Februai-y 28, 



1959, and the date for the Class B and Class O 
meet for April 4, 1959; 5) give the Committee 
authority to decide on the dives for the various 
classes; 6) add the 200 yai-d medley relay to the 
list of Class C events. Louis Litchfield moved, and 
was se<;onded by W. H. Crowdus, that the recom- 
mendations of the State Swimming Committee be 
approved and put into effect. The motion was car- 
ried unanimously. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Cecil A. 
Thornton, that the next meeting of the Board of 
Control be held in Louisville January 30-31, 1959. 
The motion was can'ied unanimously. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by Robert P. 
Fors>i;he, that all bills of the Association for the 
period beginning October 11, 1958, and ending De- 
cember 19, 1958 be allowed. The motion was car- 
ried unanimously. 

The Board was then called to order in its 
capacity as Board of Directors of the K.H.S.A.A. 
Protection Fund. 

Secretary-Treasurer Sanford presented the list 
of claims which had been paid by the Protection 
Fund for the period beginning- October 11, 1958, and 
ending December 19, 1958, the total amount of 
these claims being $11,975.47. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by K. G. 
Gillaspie, that the claims as presented by the Sec- 
retai-y-Ti-easurer be allowed. The motion was car- 
ried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned. 



Football Championships 

The Board of Control at its December meeting 
accepted the recommendations of its Football Com- 
mittee with respect to the regional set-up for the 
various classes in the Football Play-Offs, scheduled 
to begin next fall. The Board changed from five to 
four the minimum number of games necessary for 
a team to play in its class to qualify for a regional 
chapionship. The regional claissifications are as 
follows: 

CLASS AAA 

Region I — Atherton, Central, DeSales, duPont 
Manual, Flaget, Male, St. Xavier, Shawnee, Trinity. 

Region II — Eastern, Butler, Durrett, Fern Creek, 
Seneca, S'outhern, Valley, Waggener. 
CLASS AA 

Region I — Bowling Green, Caldwell Co., Crit- 
tenden Co., Daviess Co., Franklin-Simpson, Hender- 
son, Henderson Co., Hopkinsville, Madisonville, 
Mayfield, Owensboiro, Owensboro Catholic, Paducab, 
Trigg Co. 

Region II — Danville, Dunbar, Elizabethtown, 
Franklin Co., Henry Clay, K. M. I., Lafayette, Lin- 
coln Institute, Madison-Model, Oldham Co., St. Joe 
(Bardsto%vn), Shelbyville, Somerset, Tompkinsville. 

Region III — Ashland, Boone Co., Campbell Co., 
Dixie Heights, Highlands, Holmes, Louisa, McKell, 
Newport, Newport Catholic, Russell, Wurtland. 

Region IV — Belfi-y, Bell Co., Corbin, Cumber- 
land, Evarts, Hall, Hazel Green (E. Bernstadt), 
Hazard, Jenkins, Knox Central, Middlesboro, 
Napier, Pikeville, Prestonsburg, Wheelwright, 
Whitesburg. 

CLASS A 

Region I — Attucks, Douglass (Henderson), 
Douglass (Murray), Fulton, High Street, Lincoln 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1959 



Page Fifteen 



(Franklin), Lincoln (Paduoah), Morganfield, Mur- 
ray, Providence, Russellville, Sturgis, Western 
(Owensboro). 

Region H — Anderson, Bardstown, Bate, Camp- 
bellsville, Oountry Day, Ft. Knox, Frankfort, 
Georgetown, Glasgow, Harrodsburg, Jessamine Ct)., 
Lancaster, Lebanon, Lincoln (Stanford), Old Ken- 
tucky Home, Rosenwald (Lebanon), St. Charles, 
Shepherdsville, Springfield, Stanford, Versailles. 

Region in — ^Beec'hwood, Bellevue, Carlisle, Cat- 
lettsburg, Cynthiana, Dayton, DuBois, Irvine, Lloyd, 
Ludlow, Millersburg Mili. Ilnst., Mt. Sterling, Paris, 
Raceland, Western (Paris), Winchester. 

Region IV — ^Barbourville, Benham, Black Star, 
Eaist Benham, East Main Street (Lynch), Elkhorn 
City, Fleming-Neon, Harlan, Leslie Co., Lily, Lin- 
coln (Middlesboro), London, Loyall, Lynn Camp, 
Paintsville, Pineville, Rosenwald (Harlan), Wallins, 
Williamsburg, West Main Street (Lynch). 



Vital Role of Athletics 

By Ass't. Supt. James E. Farmer 
Jefferson County Schools 

Athletics give our youth a real-life situa- 
tion in which to fight their physical battles 
and develop healthy concepts of fair play. 
The lessons learned by those who compete 
and those who watch influence not only in- 
dividual lives, but the destinies of nations. 

The playing field is a living laboratory of 
democracy in action where all are treated 
without favor or prejudice. 

One who studies the issues confronting 
America today is reminded of the many 
threats to peace, personal security, liberty 
and happiness. Educators, ministers, parents, 
statesmen and .iust plain taxpayers have for 
decades been smug in believing in this hemi- 
sphere's security. Now new alarm is appear- 
ing on the horizon as one learns of threats to 
security and peace in the Mediterranean and 
China. One might become more concerned 
when he realises that national unrest and 
cold wars are the results of millions of people 
throughout the world being deprived of 
physical dignity. 

Developing and maintaining a physically 
fit nation is one of the important aims of 
education. The Jefferson Countv Public 
Schools constantly sunport the cardinal prin- 
ciples of athletics which are widely accented 
by public school systems which recognize 
that a wholesome program of athletics is a 
valuable part of the total educational system. 
Winning Not Only Goal 

Some regard athletics as an extra activity 
designed to help a few individuals on the 
team at the expense of the other boys and 
girls. One might feel that athletics are con- 
ducted at the expense of the taxpayer and 



the more academic side of education. This is 
far from being true. 

The athletic program involves many kinds 
of experiences throughout the year and pro- 
vides for many varying degrees of interest, 
needs and activities. It is a continuous pro- 
gram, thus challenging pupils of all ages to 
work hard to reach certain goals. 

This kind of challenge engages many who 
participate throughout their school lives, 
knowing they may never get to perform on 
the varsity team. Winning is important, yes, 
but not all important. 

Individual development is a prime goal of 
the program. A student who participates in 
athletics — and those who support and assist 
him — learn many lessons : To control temper, 
to think quickly and exercise sound .judg- 
ment, the meaning of discipline, to carry 
out orders, to meet and evaluate other i)eople, 
to solve problems, to be punctual, to gain 
the respect of others to control emotions, to 
overcome discouragement, to araply energy 
intelligently. These are all found in the ath- 
letic program that is educationally sound. 
The Effective Proeram 

The athletic program is effective when it 
is coordinated with the eeneral instructional 
nrogram and articulated with other depart- 
ments of the school. The number of students 
who benefit from it and the educational aims 
achieved justify the use of tax funds for its 

SUTTOOrt. 

The program must be kept free of com- 
mercialism and extensive travel and exces- 
sive loss of school time. The Drogram must 
include educative exercises to reach non- 
oarticipating students and community fol- 
lowers of teams to insure prooer understand- 
ine and the need for adherence to principles 
and game ethics. 

Boys' interscholastic athletics, although 
only a part of a high school's over-all uro- 
gram, usually attract more public attention 
than all other parts of the program combined. 
But related activities — extramurals, intra- 
murals and physical education classes — seek 
to reach and benefit all bovs and girls. 

Good sportsmanship, an immediate eoal of 
the program, will have lifelong value for 
these students. These students are our com- 
munity leaders of tomorrow and. as adults, 
will demonstrate the attitudes thev are now 
learning. Cooperation and competition help 
achieve this goal. 

The school can no longer exoect to meet 
its obligations to the individual, the state> 
the nation or the world by limiting its in- 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1959 



fluence to formal instruction in the class- 
room only. The whole school, including the 
gymnasium, stadium, classrooms, auditor- 
iums, track and all other facilities, must be 
used to help the youth as well as the adult 
population to develop strong leaders, better 
attitudes, sound thinkers and fair play. 



CONTEST MANAGEMENT DETAILS 

(Continued from Dec. Issue - THE ATHLETE) 

9 — Players' Benches: Resei-ved areas for sub- 
stitute players and coaches of visiting: and home 
teams should be roped off or protected by student 
guards. No one else should be allowed on these 
benches. 

10 — Physician: Check to see the physician ex- 
pected for this contest is oresenit. If he can't attend 
have his or some physician's telephone number 
available in case of emergency. 

11 — Bands: Reserved seats or benches should 
be provided for visiting schools and home school 
bands. Be sure that band leaders know the time 
allotted to them betiveen halves and also what is 
expected of them after the game. 

12 — Contracts: The principal, athletic dii'ector, 
or coach should have game and officials' contracts 
in his possession at game time for possible reference. 

1.3 — Contract Guarantees and Payments: Have 
school athletic association checks available for 
visiting school (if contract calls for guarantee) and 
for officials, unless they are to be mailed. These 
should be given to the persons concerned during 
the intermission period or immediately after the 
game. 

14 — Eligibility List: Have eligibility list for 
both competing sdhools accessible at the time of 
the contest. 

15 — Scoreboard Arrangements: Student manag- 
ers or trained adults should be assigned to score- 
boards. Generally they should be individuals who 
have had experience in this work. 

16 — Guards for Dressing Rooms: It is advisable 
to have guards on duty in visiting and home school 
dressing rooms during the progress of the game. 
Even though valuables should he checked, clothing 
and other ai-ticles sometimes disappear if a locker 
room is left unguarded. An alternative is to assign 
a visiting team to a room that may be locked and 
tiheoi give the key to the coach or faculty of student 
manager. 

17 — Extra Clothing for Substitutes: Adequate 
clothing is especially important in football. Parents 
legitimately object if their sons are insufficiently 
protected while sitting on the bench. Have a suf- 
ficient number of warm coats or blankets for all 
substitutes. Treat all squad members alike. 

18 — Concessions: Check to see that concessions 
are being properly handled. 

19 — Cheerleaders: Cheerleaders should be on 
their assignments at least a half hour before the 
game. 

20 — Police: Police officers assigned to duty at 
the game should be available before or soon after 
gates are open. Officers stationed near the main 
g'ate or stadium entrance have a good psychological 
effect. 

21 — Public Address Systems: Check public ad- 



dress system prior to start of game. 

22 — Rest Rooms: Make certain rest rooms are 
properly equipped and are available when the 
gymnasium door or field gates are open. 

23 — Guarding Extra Equipment: Student should 
be assignied to see extra equipment, such as balls, 
bats, helmets, jackets, sweaters, blankets and pads 
are not lost during games. 

24 — Pre-Game Activity: Have mimeographed 
schedule of pre-game activities in hands of band 
leaders, coaches, visiting school officials, contest 
officials and press and radio men. 

25 — Press and Radio: See that clean facilities 
are available to individtials involved. 

POST-HOME GAME DUTIES 

1 — Payment of Officials: Often official will be 
paid between halves or at the end of the game. Do 
not make it necessary for him to hunt up someone 
in order to geit his pay. Unless it is to be mailed, 
it should be ready for him without his having toi 
ask for it. 

2 — Payment of Visiting School: If this detail 
was not attended to during or before half, do it im- 
mediately after the contest unless it is to be mailed 
to the school. 

3 — Storage of Equipment: Student managers 
should be assigned to the responsibility of collect- 
ing and storing all field, court or game equipment 
after each contest. 

4 — Contest Receipts: No later than two days 
after g-ame, athletic director or faculty manager 
should check contest receipts. 

5 — General Financial Statement: Have a com- 
plete financial statement ready within a week after 
game. Reports should be made to principal or 
superintendent of schools, or both. 

6 — Concessions Report: If concessions are 
handled by school athletic association a financial 
report and any inventory of goods left is made after 
each game. If school clubs or organizations handle 
concessions a financial report should be made tO' 
the athletic director or high school principal. 

7 — Record of Athletic Officials: Schools are 
asked to rate athletic officials at season's end. 
Records of all officials should be kept until rating 
blank is received. List the man's name and rate him 
in the various categories required. Such record will 
be of value when officials for another year are be- 
ing considered. Records of officials should be kept 
for both out-of-town and home games. 

8 — Participation Records: After each game 
coaches' record of all participants should be made. 
This may be used for award purposes, final season 
reports and permanent information. 

9 — Filing of Contest Data: It is desirable to 
have all information concerning a particular con- 
test available in one place. A filing procedure is 
possible if data regarding g-ame are compiled shortly 
after its conclusion. Many times a large envelope 
labeled with the name and date of the contest can 
contain this information. 

10 — Reports of Injuries: Be sure all injuries 
are given immediate attention and reported as re- 
quired by the board of education, insurance com- 
pany, or accident benefit plan. 

11 — Closing Correspondence: If officials did 
an outstanding job, write and tell them. Let other 
school know you were glad to have played them. 
Write letter about any complaint. 



K. H. S. A. A. TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS 

District and Regional Tournament Directors can get all of their supplies 
and needs to run a tournament from Hunt's. We have the merchandise 
listed below in stock for immediate shipment. Call or write us your needs. 

BASKETBALLS 

Get the feel of a basketball same as will be used in the State Tournament in 
Lexington, in your District or Regional Tournament. We have the following: 

No. AFR, our exclusive panel lock molded ball endorsed by Coach 

Adolph Rupp and used by the University of Kentucky Basketball 

Team. 

No. XIOL Last Bilt ball made by MacGregor. 
Both of these balls will definitely be used in the State Tournament in 
Lexington. 

ADMISSION TICKETS 

Complete stock of admission tickets, 2,000 tickets to the roll, printed with 
established admission prices and numbered consecutively. Also PASS OUT 
tickets, ADMIT ONE tickets, all in different colors, $1.25 per roll of 2,000. 

TROPHIES AND AWARDS 

We can take care of your Sportsmanship trophies, individual charms for 
All-Star teams, All-Tournament teams, etc. Our stock is complete and we 
can engrave as per your instructions. 

ACCESSORIES 

Nets, scorebooks, first-aid supplies, whistles, stopwatches, timers' horns, 
powdered resin, bath towels, shoe laces, colored top sweat socks, carry-all 
bags. All of this merchandise in stock for at once delivery. 

BANKS AND GOALS 

We have a complete stock of fan-shaped steel, fan-shaped wood backboards 
complete with goals and nets in stock for at once delivery. A phone call will 
get them off to you at once. All glass banks also available from factory. 

FAIR-PLAY ELECTRIC BASKETBALL SCOREBOARDS 

We have IN STOCK the Tick-A-Way FF-IS Fair-Play and the dial type 
DeLUXE FD-60 Fair-Play in our warehouse ready for immediate shipment. 
A call will get them to your gymnasium in 48 hours. 

Turn all of your needs over to us. We will he glad to handle them for you. 
Our stock is complete. 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

INCORPORATED 

PHONE 103 OR 104 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

Wp Ship The DaV You BuV 




UTCLIFFE^ 




DISTRICT TROPHIES 

Sutcliffe will supply the KHSAA Distiict 
Trophies for 1959! In Febraary 1959, Sutcliffe 
will send two KHSAA Trophies to each District 
for presentation to the victors. 



WUl Supply . . . 
Distinguished Trophies 
For District Winners 

When Sports Equipment is Really Fine 
Youll Find it in Sutcliffe's Line 



OFFICIAL TOURNAMENT BALL 




The Rawling's RSS Official Basketball is the 
choice of most Kentucky High School teams . . . 
and it will be used in most of the Regional and 
District tournaments . . . and at the State Tour- 
nament at U. of K. Coliseum, Lexington. Of 
course, you may buy this recognized basketball 
at Sutcliffe's. 



To High School Sportsmen Throughout Our State 
May Your New Year Be Truly Great ! 

May You All Be Happy, Successful, Too, 

Is Our Sincere and Cordial Wish to You! 

"SPORTSMEN'S HEADQUARTERS FOR OVER HALF A CENTURY" 




UTCLIFFE CO 

SVILLE H. KENTU CKY 




Hiqh khool AthMe 



Memorial Coliseum at the University of Kentucky 




(f 



Pictured above is the Memorial Coliseum of the University of Kentucky, site of the 1959 State High School 
Basketball Tournament. Located on the Avenue of Champions between Lexington Avenue and Rose Street, the coli- 
seum has a seating: capacity of 11,400 for basketball games and 15,000 for programs in which folding chairs may be 
placed on the playing floor. Seating space for approximately 300 persons is provided alongside the 75-foot swimming 
pool. Names of the 9,307 Gold Star Kentuckians have been lettered on permanent plaques which occupy recessed wall 
panels in the coliseum entry ramps. Special bronze stars commemorating: each LTniversity of Kentucky student who 
died in World War II are located in the coliseum concourses. 




Omcial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
FEBRUARY - 1353 



Cage Show Stimulating 

NOTE: The following article appeared in the Mil- 
waukee Sentinel March 23, 1958, after Sports Editor 
Lloyd Larson had attended the semi-final session 
of the Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Associa- 
tion's State Basketball Tournament. Mr. Larson, 
who has addressed National Federation meetings, 
is a former athlete and official and is presently 
president of the Milwaukee Public School Board. 



When it comes to stimulating experiences, 
it's difficult if not impossible, to beat sitting 
in on a state high school basketball tourna- 
ment, as I did Friday night. 

It goes far beyond the enjoyable "lift" 
provided by the very presence of some 14,000 
jammed into the Wisconsin field-house at 
Madison for the all-important semi-finals 
. . . the ear-splitting cheers and displays of 
tremendous enthusiasm in other forms . . . 
the skillful, all out performances by the 
youthful, well matched competitors . . . the 
mounting tension as the issue in each game 
remained in doubt until the very end . . . 
the showmanship . . . the drama of it all. 

You look at those boys and think first of 
the lessons in true democracy already ab- 
sorbed, without anvone belaboring the point. 
There is nothing like class distinction. Class 
only in the sense that one has more ability 
than another. Family economy status means 
nothing. There are no race, color and creed 
considerations. They are athletes, one and 
all. Teen age athletes engaged in clean, 
wholesome competition — significantly, in a 
snort of American invention. 

The same spirit prevails in the stands. 
Even the most partisan fans, generally speak- 
ing, concentrate on being FOR their team 
rather than AGAINST the other. That's a 
wonderful thing in itself. The world needs 
more PROS and less ANTIS. 

IMPORTANT LESSONS GALORE 

Then those many other lessons which, by 
all odds, should serve as preparation for 
adult life and help make boys better citizens. 

They are having brought home to them 
early many things which should stand them 
in good stead forevermore, like: 

The value of teamwork . . . the one who 
goes it alone is extremely rare . . . nothing 
comes easy in life, which can be rough at 
times and almost without fail will be marked 
by ups and downs . . . nobody wins 'em all 



. . . success often is based on the ability to 
take it . . . take it in the way of bad breaks, 
disappointing defeat or whatever . . . learn to 
live by the rules and accept decisions of re- 
sponsible authority — officials in the case of 
basketball . . . learn to get along with people 
. . . teammate and opponent . . . superior or 
equal . . . learn that no matter who you are, 
what you are doing or what your physical 
or mental qualifications, there is always 
someone just as good as you or better . . . 
in short, nobody is God's gift to the world. 

FOOD FOR THOUGHT FOR CRITICS 

And you think of the critics who decry the 
emphasis on sports, regardless of how well 
conducted, in the total educational picture, 
and those viewers-with-alarm who inferen- 
tially at least, suggest that there is more bad 
than good in the youth of today. 

It is apparent that our high schools have 
been and are doing a real job in channeling 
youthful enthusiasm in the right direction 
through the medium of sports. A good tipoff 
in this respect is the reduction of booing to 
an amazing minimum. That is indicative of 
sound guidance and continuing control. 

The benefits of letting off steam, so to 
sneak, should be quite obvious. Is anyone 
naive enough to believe boys and girls of 
high school age won't turn elsewhere if denied 
the onportunity to do so the right way? Can 
anyone think of a better outlet than an ex- 
citing competitive event, with solid control 
elements nresent? In fact, the day such ex- 
tracurricular events are denied the young- 
sters also will see the creation of a problem 
much greater than the one that now exists. 

Yes, it was quite a show, a terrific show 
even from a strict basketball standpoint. 
Naturally it was a sad blow for Shawano 
to be dethroned and deprived of an almost 
unprecedented string of three straight state 
titles. So it was, too, for Madison West in 
its intra-city duel with East. But victory 
finally went to Milwaukee's fine North Siders 
and East. And who can say, in all fairness, 
that they didn't deserve to finish on top ! 

Until the millenium is reached, and some- 
one figures out how to have both sides win, 
that's the way of basketball — and life. Some- 
body wins, somebody loses. Either way, 
everybody keeps on living and should be 
better for it. 



7726 Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXI— NO. 7 



FEBRUARY, 1959 



.00 Per Year 



National Federation Meeting 

The National Alliance Football Committee and 
the executive officers of the National Federation 
of State Hig'h School Athletic Associations met at 
the Hotel Monteleone, New Orleans, Louisiana, dur- 
ing the period of January 4-7, 1959. The K.H.S.A.A. 
was represented at the football meeting by Athletic 
Director Edgar McNabb, Beechwood High School, 
football clinic director; Coach Ollie Leathers, Frank- 
fort High School, President of the Kentucky Coaches 
Association; and Principal Joe Ohr, Irvine High 
School, Secreltary of the Kentucky Coaches Associa- 
tion. The K.H.S.A.A. was represemted at the session 
for executive officers by President Russell William- 
son and Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield. 

During the first meeting of the football group, 
which was held on Monday morning, January 5, 
brief reports were given by the chairmen of the 
standing commitees. The Monday aftei-noon session 
was given over mostly to a study of tbe football 
questionnaire results for 1959. Tuesday morning 
and afternoon action was taken on rules changes. 

Sessions for the executive officers were held on 
Tuesday evening and Wednesday morning. Topics 
discussed were: Conditioning of Athletes, Baseball 
Clinics, Report of Fitness Conferences, Basketball 
Up-to-Date, and Track and Field Developments. 

Mr. Clifford B. Fagan, Executive Secretary of 
the National Federation, has summarized the more 
important rule modifications which received the ap- 
proval of the football committee. His summary 
follows: 

A CHECK-UP ON 1958 CODE: Approximately 
20,000 National Alliance Football Questionnaires 
were distributed by the National Federation, the 
National Junior College Athletic Association and 
the National Association for Intercollegiate Ath- 
letics. Approximately 6,800 were returned and tabu- 
lated. The proportionate vote in one group differed 
very little fi-^m the corresponding vote in each of 
the other groups. This prevailed for the check-up on 
last season's rules as well as for possible revisions 
for the 1959 season. 

QUESTIONNAIRE results from all sections of 
the country indicated a high degree of satisfaction 
with the changes which had been authorized for the 
1958 season. The revision which reduced the length 
of the coaches' boxes to 30 yards between the 35 
yardlines was approved by a vote of more than 
12 ito 1. The cheek-up indicated the coach-player 
conference permitted on the field of play during a 
charged time-out was particularly satisfactory, the 
approval vote being approximately 30 to 1. The 
Umpire's primary jurisdiction over timing was en- 
dorsed by a vote of nearly 4 to 1. The 1958 provis- 
ions for extending the goal line beyond the sideline 
when a runner holds the ball over out-of-bounds 
area and for having the ball become alive even 



when the snap is illegal were also endorsed by sub- 
stantial majorities. The requirement that a Captain 
make any decision before a charged time-out is 
granted was favored by a 7 to 1 vote. 757" reported 
it desirable to permit A to move the ball along the 
proper yardline for either a snap or a free-kick 
following a fair catch. 

Part II of the questio.nnaire revealed the re- 
vised interior lineman rule was of considerable as- 
sistance to Officials and that the iiile itself did not 
handicap the offense. The desire to use fiber or 
hard material on the hand or forearm was reported 
as a cointinuing problem. The practice of players 
faking defective equipment to stop the clock, so 
common a few years ago, seldom caused a problem 
during the 1958 season. 

Valuable reports made by chaii-men of the var- 
ious Standing Committees provided information 
and material upon which the Rules Committee 
could base action. These reports were made by 
Kermit Anderson of the Safety Committee, J. C. 
Harper of the Game Administration Committee, 
Lyle Quinn of the Equipment Committee, S. D. 
Jackson of the Research Committee and Webb 
Porier of the Statistical Committee. W. M. Runyon 
presented the official report of fatalities resulting 
from 1958 interscholastic competition. Several carry- 
over problems and new studies were referred to 
St.nnding Committees for future study and recom- 
mendations. 

ABOUT PROPOSALS FOR 1959: Questionnaire 
returns indicated opinion was evenly divided re- 
garding the advisability of specifying that begin- 
ning in a given year all hard material in rib, shoulder 
and hip pads be covered with soft material. 3297 
favored the proposal while 3280 opposed it. Only 1 
out of 5 favored reducing the ready-for-play period 
from 25 to 20 seconds. 5 out of 6 returns did not 
favor increasing the value of a successful field goal 
to 4 points. The questionnaire showed a slight ma- 
jority preferred revising the kicking rule so that 
when a scrimmage-kick was first touched by K be- 
yond the line, it would immediately become dead. 
The discussion revealed the possibility of consider- 
able simplication by eliminating complicated situa- 
tons which can ai'ise when K first touches. These 
situations must now be covered in supplementary 
material such as the Case Book and Meeting Folders. 
For various reasons, the Committee did not choose 
to adopt the proposal but authorized additional ex- 
perimentatiotti and continued study of it. A com- 
panion proposal which would declare a free-kick 
dead when K first touched beyond the free-kick line 
received a neg-ative questionnaire vote. 

Substantial majorities endorsed the presemt 
rules coverage for: (a) equipment repair time-outs; 
(b) ineligible players muffing-, batting or catch- 
ing a forward pass while legally beyond the neutral 
(Continued on Page Six) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1959 



FEBRUARY, 1959 



VOL. XXI— NO. 7 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones. (1957-61) Somerset: W. H. Crowdus 
(1658-62) Franklin; Jack Dawson (1958-62). Louisville; Robert 
P. Forsythe (1955-59). Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie (1955-59), 
Georgetown: Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Bates $1.00 Per Year 



Jrom the Commcssiorte'i s (Jffi 



ice 



1959 District Tournament Sites 



(1) Carlisle County, (2) Ballard Memorial 
(3) Lowes, (4) Murray Training, (5) Crit- 
tencien County, (6) MacJisonville, (7) Hop- 
kinsville, (8) Tocid County, (9) Providence, 
(10) Henderson, (11) Calhoun, (12) Owens- 
boro, (13) Flaherty,, (14) Butler County, 
(15) Beaver Dam, (16) Muhlenberg Central, 
(17) Bowling Green, (18) Russellville, (19) 
Park City, (20) Metcalfe County, (21) Camp- 
bellsville, (22) Memorial, (23) Elizabethtown, 
(24) Old Kentucky Home, (25) St. Xavier, 
(26) Louisville Male, (27) Fern Creek. (28) 
Waggener, (29) Sheoherdsville. (30) Shelby- 
ville. (31) Oldham County, (32) Owen Coun- 
tv, (33) Boone County, (34) Covinaton Cath- 
olic. (35) Newport Catholic. (36) Highlands, 
(37) Scott County. (38) Bracken County, 
(39) Maysville, (40) Paris, (41) Frankfort, 
(42) Versailles. (43'> University, (44) Madi- 
son Central. (45) Junction Citv, (46) Me- 
morial. (47) Somerset, (48) Hazel Green, 
(49) Tyner, (50) Barbourville. (51) Bell 
Countv. (52) Black Star, (53) Whitesburg. 
(54) Hazard, (55) Breathitt. (56) Powell 
County. (57) Johns Creek, (58) Prestons- 
burg, (59) Inez. (60) Ezel, (61) Winchester, 
(62) Owinesville, (63) Vanceburg-Lewds 
County, (64) Catlettsburg. 

1959 Regional Tournament Sites 

(1) Murray State College. (2) Crittenden 
County High School, (3) Owensboro Snorts- 
center, (4) Beaver Dam High School, (5) 
Bowliner Green High School. (6) Elizabeth- 
town High School, (7) Louisville, (8) Old- 
ham County High School, (9) Boone Coun- 
tv High School. (10) Harrison County 
High School. (11) U. K. Coliseum, (12) 
Somerset High School, (13) Clay Countv 
High School, (14) Hazard High School, (15) 



Prestonsburg High School, (16) Morehead 
State College. 

"Certified" and "Approved" Officials 

Since the list of "certified" officials ap- 
peared in the January issue of the magazine 
nine additional officials have qualified for 
the "certified" rating. They are: Bill Baird, 
Walter Combs, Thomas H. Cubbage, J. D. 
Hudson, Joseph D. Hutt, Anthony McCord, 
Curtis Peay, Ralph Thompson, and Lloyd G. 
Whipple. 

The name of Allen V. King has been added 
to the "approved" list. 

News About Swimming 

The 1959 State High School Swimming 
Meet for Class A will be held in Lexington 
on Saturday, February 28, at the University 
of Kentucky pool. The meet for Classes B 
and C will be held at the same location on 
Saturday, April 4. 

Class A schools will include those high 
schools with an enrollment of 750 or more 
(grades 9-12), Class B will include those 
schools with an enrollment between 300 and 
750, and Class C will be schools with an en- 
rollment of less than 300. Any school may 
enter a class above its classification. 

Class A will have eleven events this year, 
the same number as last year. Class A swim- 
mers may compete in only two events, in- 
cluding Fancy Diving. The Class A events 
are as follows: 400 Yard Fi-eestyle, 50 Yard 
Freestyle, 100 Yard Butterfly, 200 Yard 
Freestyle, 100 Yard Backstroke, 100 Yard 
Freestyle, 100 Yard Breaststroke, Fancy 
Diving, 150 Yard Individual Medley, 200 
Yard Medley Relay, and 200 Yard Freestyle 
Relay. 

The method of entering teams in the meet 
will be the same as in past years, with the 
State Office supplying entry blanks to the 
schools whose principals have indicated that 
they will enter teams in the meet. The As- 
sociation will make the same allowance to 
participants for transportation, lodging, and 
meals, as is given State Track Meet partici- 
pants in each event. Expenses for the swim- 
ming coach will be paid if the school has as 
many as four entries in the State Meet. 



Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at the 
Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, on Saturday 
morning, January 31, 1959. The meeting 
was called to order by President Russell Wil- 
liamson at 9:00 with all Board members, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1959 



Page Three 



Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, and As- 
sistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield pres- 
ent. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by Jack 
Dawson, that the reading of the minutes of 
the December 20th meeting be waived, since 
the members of the Board had received 
copies of these minutes. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Assistant Commissioner Mansfield report- 
ed that the advance sale of State Tournament 
tickets had been very fine, and that it was 
possible that some of the sessions would be 
sold out before the opening date of the Tour- 
nament. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that the following regulations con- 
cerning fees for regional tournament offi- 
cial be adopted: The official shall receive 
a fee of $20.00 per game and a transporta- 
tion allowance of seven cents per mile for all 
necessary travel. In the event it is neces- 
sary for the official to remain overnight at 
the tournament site, he shall be paid an ad- 
ditional $10.00 per day for lodging and meals. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by Cecil 
A. Thornton, that the 1959 State Track Meet 
be held in Lexington on May 22-23, and that 
the Commissioner be authorized to set the 
dates and determine the sites of the other 
spring events. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

The Board approved the usual invitation 
to the K. H. S. A. A. dinner meeting, sched- 
uled to be held in Louisville on Thursday, 
April 16, and authorized the Commissioner 
to send two complimentary tickets to each 
member school upon request. 

The Commissioner reported a tie in the bal- 
loting for the tournament site in District 26 
between Louisville Male High School and 
Atherton High School. Director Jack Daw- 
son stated that a plan had been worked out 
between the two principals involved by which 
the tournament would be held at Louisville 
Male under the management of Atherton 
Principal Russell Garth. The Commissioner 
recommended that this plan be accepted. 
W. B. Jones moved, seconded by Jack Daw- 
son, that the plan for breaking the tie in Dis- 
trict 26, as recommended by Director Jack 
Dawson and Commissioner Sanford, be ap- 
proved. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by Cecil 
A. Thornton, that all bills of the Association, 
beginning December 20, 1958, and ending 



January 30, 1959, be approved. The motion 
was carried unanimously. The Board was 
then called to order in its capacity as the 
Board of Directors of the K. H. S. A. A. Pro- 
tection Fund. 

Secretary-Treasurer Sanford presented a 
list of claims which had been paid by the 
Protection Fund since December 20, 1958, 
the total amount of these claims being $4,- 
259.31. Jack Dawson moved, seconded by 
W. H. Crowdus, that the claims as presented 
by the Secretary-Treasurer of the Protection 
Fund be allowed. The motion was carried 
unanimously. There being no further busi- 
ness the meeting adjourned. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List compiled February 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the heme phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Amburgey, Jesse, May's Lick, So 3-2850, So 3-2845 

Bastin, Wendell, Route 1, Kings Mountain 

Blanton, Charles R., P. O. Box 745, Harlan, 2764, 724-720 

Boyd, Tommy, Ewing Hall, 4th and Upper, Lexnigton 

Burdette, Wally M., 1514 Oleanda Ave., Apt. 4, Louisville, 

EM 3-2845 
Cantrell, Orville, P. O. Box 243, Berea 
Caple, Harold E., 318 Poplar, Ludlow, AX 1-6491 
Chambers, William Virgil, 251 North 3rd, Danville, 2543 
Clark, Owen B., Route 6, Lexington 
Combs, Roy B., 2300 Becker Ct., Louisville 16, SP 8-5803, 

EM 8-5376 
Con, John D., 1243 College, Bowling Green, Vi 3-3559 
Craig, Randy, 4676 Delhi Rd., Cincinnati 38, Ohio 
DeGroote, James A., 1539 McArthur Dr., Evansville, Ind., 

GR 65497 HA 48481 E.xt. 214 
Farmer, Russell. 210 Oak, Harlan, 1903, 760 
Goff, Richard, Steff 

Grooms, Roger C, 1733 Mears Ave., Cincinnati 30, Ohio 
Hammond, William, 15 Walnut, Berea, 104W, 820 
Harper, Robie, Jr., Ky. Wesleyan College, Owensboro, Murray 

4-5324 
Harris, Charles A., P. O. Box 91, Harlan, 2676, 87-R or 87-J 
Hedges, George, Jr., Broadway, Dry Ridge, TA 3-2281, Ta 3-9051 
Henry, Tommy, Lambda Chi Alpha House, Georgetown, 261 
Hurley, Robert, Box 244, Williamson, W. Va. 
Johnson, Bob, P. O. Box 274, Kenvir, 1454 
Laubheimer, Donald T., 4914 South Third St„ Louisville, 

EM 6-2411, JU 2-2541 
MeCord. Anthony A., 1636 Courtney Ave., Lexington, 3-3814 
McQuilling, Gerald, 2011 S. Lombard, Evansville, Indinaa, 

GR 66941, HA 53311 
Melmige, James, Matewan, W. Va. 
Morgan, James, 431 Ky. Ct., Lexington 

Mulligan, J. T., 427 Center, Erianger, DI 1-5678, AX 1-4450 
Newman, Buddy, 223 Lincoln Ave., Henderson 
Page, William D.. Pikeville College, Pikeville, 9102 
Preece. Boyce C Box 544, Kermit, W. Va. 
Presson, Jim. College Station, Murray 
Eannells, Richard H., Box 291, Morehead State College, More- 



head 



'ille 



Slaughter, Alton H., 1631 S. Main, Hopkii 

Spaulding, Stan, 335 Arlington, Waverly, Ohio, 619-M, 51 

Storm, Darrell C, P. O. Box 152, Corbin, 1139-J 

Taylor, James W., Route 5, c/o E. R. Webb, Lexington, 22166 

(Bus. No. I 
Thompson, Jimmie, Pikeville College, Pikeville 
Vermillion Charles D., 702 Master St., P. O. Box 355, Corbin, 

166 
Vineiquerra, Philip, Matewan, W. Va. 
Wallace, James H., 1232 Corregidor, Evansville, Ind., GR 6-2622, 

HA 4-6481, Ext. 219 
Wayne, Sherrill. 204 Claremont, Louisville 6 
Whipple, Lloyd G., 216 S. Frederick, Evan 

65809, HA 43311 
White, James D., 1445 Beech St., Louisville, Sp 6-1117, JU 

4-6356 
Witt, Fred, Whitesburg, 2661 
Wirtz, Howard A., 5805 Lathrop PI., Cincinnati 24, Ohio, 

MU 1-6331, PL 1-1323 



Ind., GR 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1959 



Schools' Ratings of Football Officials for 1958 



NAME 

Abele, George F 

Allmon, Raymond T. 

Almon, James H 

Alston, E. Deedom 

Anderson, Everett E. Jr. 
Attick, Capt. Wm. E-- 

Autore, Daniel 

Baker, Charles J. 

Ball, Al 

Ballard, Robert A. 

Barbour, Morris 

Barlow, Billy B. 

Barlow, Bob 

Barlow, James L. 

Barry, Gerald E. 

Bartels, John E. 

Baskin, Sylvesiter 

Beck, C. Norman 

Bell, Clarence T. 

Bell, Thomas P. 

Bennett, Howard "Pete" 

Ben-y, William 

Betz, Dick 

Black, Charles D. 

Blackbui-n, Adrian 

Blanton, Homer 

Boeh, Bill 

Boeing, Charles F. 

Bond, Jack C. 

Bonner, John C. 

Bostick, Lord M. Jr 

Bowman, Earl G. "Dick" 

Boyles, Jerry 

Brandenburg, Donald E, 

Brichler, Joe A. 

Brizendine, Vic 

Broderick, CaiToll A.__ 
Brotzge, Maurice J. _- 

Brown, George W 

Brown, John W 

Burke, Dan 

Butcher, DeVoil 

Byrd, Hariy G. 

Caiman, E. C, Jr., 

Campbell, John J. 

Canter, John 

Carlson, David A 

Carroll, Thomas J. 

Cai-uso, J. T. 

Cassada, Ed 

Cathey, Gene S. 

Cecil, A. Morris 

Chambers, Dan, Jr. 

Cisco, Robert D. 

Clagg, Harry G. 

Clark, Owen B. 

Clinard, Fred L. 

Coleman, L.J. ,Jr.,'"1Duke" 

Combs, Travis 

Corea, Frank 

Coulter, William M 

Grace, James 

Craft, Bill 

Creasey, Fred 

Crosthwaite, John S., Jr. 
Crouch, Jack J. 



Excel. Good Fair Poor 



6 

3 

4 

7 
14 

5 
3 
1 
5 
2 
2 
9 
2 
9 
6 
5 
12 
1 
6 
15 
10 
7 
8 
2 


4 
6 
8 
10 
13 
11 
5 
9 
3 


1 

7 
1 
5 

5 

2 
11 
23 
5 



3 


2 


4 





4 





2 


2 


13 


2 


1 





4 


2 


5 


3 1 


1 





6 


1 1 


9 


1 1 


3 


1 


9 





8 


1 1 


1 





6 


1 


4 





6 





8 











8 





1 





2 











5 


1 


4 





2 





3 





3 


1 


1 


1 


11 


5 


5 


2 


5 





5 


2 





! 


13 


1 


8 





3 


1 


3 





2 


2 


5 





1 


2 


4 


5 


9 


1 


7 


1 


5 


2 


5 


1 


9 





5 


1 


5 





8 


1 


3 





1 





3 











5 





4 





9 


5 


1 





4 





5 





2 





3 





5 


1 


4 





1 






NAME 

Crum, Edward E. 

Gulp, Willard E., Capt. 

Current, Ellis Ray 

Daniels, Robert M. 

Davis, Charlie 

Davis, Clyde E. 

DeMuth, Paul E. 

Denton, Charles M. 

Derrington, Robert 

DeVauIt, Don 

Dial, Jack W. 

DiMuzzio, Robert M. __ 

Dixie, Cornelius 

Dolan, Richard J. 

Dotson, W. S. 

Duke, Jesse W. 

Durkin, Jack H. 

Edelen, Ben R. 

Elkins, R. Percy 

Ellspermann, George __ 

Elovitz, Carl 

Ensslin, Thomas F. 

Ernst, Ray C. 

Falls, William M. 

Faust, John "Jack" 

Fey, Allen 

Figg, Charles Raymond 
Fishback, Olen Wayne 

Fitch, F. A. 

Fletcher, John L. 

Florence, Robert H 

Forbes, John W. "Jack" 

Fortney, Robert Lee 

Foster, Beri-yman E._. 

Fraley, Bill 

Freese, Oliver "T" 

Fugate, E. Hugh 

Funkhouser, Roy A. _ 

Gammon, William H 

Gettler, John F. 

Gibbons, E. G 

Gilly, Joe G. 

Golden, Billy Joe 

Gorham, Robert J. 

Grace, Charles K. 

Grace, Hickory E. Jr._ 

Graham, James E. 

Greene, Paul "Dutch". 
Greenslait, James W. __ 
Grooms, Randall . 

Gruneisen, Sam J. 

Hadden, Newell P. Jr. 
Hagan, Joseph "Red" _. 

Hagerman, Bart 

Hale, Don C. 

Hall, Frank P. 

Hanes, Edward C. 

Harris, Gene 

Hari-is, Russell 

Harrod, Robert Leslie 

Hartig, Malcolm W 

Hartley, William E. _- 

Hatfield, Cecil 

Hatfield, Gene E. 

Hawkins, Robert W. - 
Heinold, Jack 



Excel. Good Fair Poor 



I 5 


6 


1 


3 


10 





10 


5 








1 





7 








3 


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3 


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9 


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10 


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1 


1 





3 


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1 


1 





5 


4 


2 


1 


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2 





1 





1 








2 








11 


4 


4 


16 


6 


1 


2 


14 





6 


7 





5 

4 


1 

7 









3 





5 


13 





7 


11 


1 


4 


13 





1 


2 


1 


5 
9 


2 
2 


1 

1 


6 


5 


2 


16 


4 


2 


7 


1 


1 


10 


2 





6 


1 





1 


3 





1 








10 


9 





23 


8 


2 


8 


7 


2 


6 


15 


2 


5 


5 





15 


7 





12 


12 


1 


8 


2 





2 








3 


1 





1 2 


4 


1 


2 


3 





5 


2 





4 


5 


1 


4 


8 


2 


2 


5 






THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1959 



Page Five 



NAME 

Heinze, Frank 

Heinze, John G. 

Hellard, George 

Hertzberger, Robert 

Hewling, Richard 

Hoferer, Louis R. 

Hofstetter, Carl 

Holbrook, William 

Holeman, D. Fletcher __ 

Holman, S. T. 

Howerton, Jack, Jr. 

Huff, Carl R. Jr. 

Huiet, Fred, "Whitey"_. 

Hunter, Donald B. 

Hutchens, Ross 

Janning, Robert L 

Jenkins, Kean 

Jeter, John B. 

Johnson, Bernard M. 

Jones, J. Carl 

Kathman, Bernie 

Kauffman, Victor C. -_ 

Kemper, Russ 

Kerr, Kenneth 

Kimble, Frank 

King, Allen V. 

Kraesig, Charles F. 

Kyle, Leslie G. Jr. 

Lacey, Cecil E. 

Lamb, Billy J. 

Lancaster, Morris B. 

Lawrence, Richard D. __ 

Lawson, Carl E. 

Lawson, Leland 

Lee, Charles J. 

Lenahan, Thomas F. __ 

Levicki, A. P. 

Liber, James 

Lohr, Joel D. 

Longenecker, David M._ 

Lowe, Eug-ene F. 

Lowe, Stanford 

Lucas, Gene T. 

McClaskey, Booker 

McCollum, Robert G. — 

MoCowan, Connell 

McDade, C. F. "Mickey" 

McHenry, Louis P. 

McKown, C. H. "Jackie^ 

McMullan, Cecil 

McTigue, Joe 

Makepeace, Wm. H. Jr. 

Martin, Bill 

Marushi, Rudy 

Matarazzo, Sal 

Mathis, Curtis 

May, E. B., Jr. 

Mayhew, Happy 

Mayhugh, Rdbert L. __ 

Mayo, Henry L. 

Meeks, Jack 

Melmige, James, Jr. 

Mercke, Frank 

Meyer, Bud 

Miller, William A. ___ 

Millerhaus, Bill 

Mitchell, Emmett - — 

Mitchell, Vyron W. 

Moellering, Louis H. _ 
Moran, W. C. 



Excel. Good Fair Poor 



NAME 



Excel. Good Fair Poor 



2 


5 








1 


4 








12 


1 





1 


1 


1 








4 


13 








8 


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6 








1 


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1 


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4 





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3 


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5 


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4 


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1 














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6 


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4 


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fl 


19 


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2 


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3 


2 








1 


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1 





14 


8 


1 


2 


1 


2 








1 


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1 


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8 








8 


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4 


16 


1 





11 


10 








3 


1 








10 


6 








13 


6 


4 





1 











8 


11 








2 


1 








1 


1 





1 


2 


1 





1 


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4 


6 


1 





2 


2 


1 





1 











7 


6 








11 


9 








9 


1 








7 


4 


1 





1 


6 








15 


8 


2 








3 








7 


7 











1 











1 








1 


1 








6 


7 


2 





5 


7 








3 


4 








2 


9 





1 



Mordica, William 9 

Morrissey, Rock-ne 

Moss, Howard A. 11 

Moss, James W. 2 

Mudd, Ed 3 

Mullins, B. E. 3 

Muntan, Peter J. 6 

Mussman, Ralph, Jr. _ 16 

Nau, Bill I 10 

Neal, Gene | 18 

7 

17 

10 

4 

4 

4 

5 



11 

12 

11 

1 



2 

4 

11 





Noland, Douglas 

Nord, Ed 

Omer, Billy W 
O'Nan, Norman 
O'Neal, Bud ... 
Osborne, Ted , 

Overby, H. E. 

Pace, John Duncan 

Parker, Billie E. 

Parsley, Clyde E. 

Patrick, Charles C. .__ 

Peeno, Harry R. 

Pence, William M. 

Perdrue, Paul 

Perkins, Billy 

Perry, Alfred L. 

Perry, L. J. 

Pickarts, John M. 

Pinson, Eugene 

Poore, William E. 

Powell, Logan 

Radjunas, Stan 

Raisor, J. T. 

Raitt, William C. 

Reddington, James T. 

Reece, Fred 

Reed, Gordon, "Moe" 

Reinhart, Gene A 

Pentz, Thomas W. 

Riddle, Maurice G. 

Riggs, William T. 

Robertson, Everett 

Rocke, James 'M. 

Rogers, Harry K. 

Rogers, John B. 

Rolph, Harold J. 

Rudolph, Fred, Jr 

Russell, Charles, Jr 

Russell, Joe 

Rutledge, Pete 

Sabato, Al 

Sacra, Gresham 

St. Charles, Thomas A.. 

Sallee, Alan Lee 

Sauter, Harold S. 

Saylor, Ben H. 

Saylor, Deward 

Saylor, Emanuel 

Schad, James E. 

Scharfenberger, Irv. T. 

Schellhase, David 

Schlich, Paul 

Schmitt, K. F 

Schutz, John J., Jr. 

Scott, Luther 

Scott, W. L. 

Scullen, Major Allen 

Selvy, Curt 

Shaw, John H. 

Shaw, Stanley E. 



8 


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Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1959 



NAME 

Showalter, John W. __ 

Shumate, Roy V. 

Simms, Wavelan J., Jr 
Sinclair, George H. __ 

Sizeniore, Dewey 

Skinner, Earnest 

Sledd, T. 

Sloan, Earl D. 

Sloan, Wallace 

Smith, Edgar J. 

Smith, Walter K. __- 

Snider, Louis G. 

Snook, J. Patrick 

Sparks, Harry M. 

Stephenson, B. H. 

Stephenson, Harry 

Stevens, William D 

Stone, Clifton 

Strimer, Albert C. 

Strong, Arnett 

Stump, Bennett 

Sullivan, Don C. __ 

Swope, William 

Taylor, James R. .. 
Teague, Amos 



Thompson, Jack j 13 

Thompson, Jack, Jr., 

Thompson, Paul 

Thompson, Ralph __ 

Thurman, J. W. 

Treas, Joe W. 

Troutman, Doyle 

Tucker, Willia'm "Bill"- 



Excel. 


Good 


Fair 


11 


8 


1 [ 


2 














1 


6 


4 








3 








1 


2 


2 


8 


2 


4 


6 





10 


10 


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2 


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2 


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1 





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4 





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1 


1 


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3 


3 





22 


1 





3 


8 


1 





3 











3 



NAME 

Vance, Wendell 

VanKirk, Alvia S. 

VanMeter, David G. __ 
VanMeter, John Wm.,Jr. 

Varner, Ray G. 

Vennari, Paul 

Waide, Harry 

Waldrop, Douglas S 

Walker, Paul R. 

Waller, Carlton D. 

Wanchic, Nicholas 

Watson, Ronald L. 

Watts, Shirley R. 

Weber, David 

Weber, Edward H. 

Weber, Walter W. 

Welch, Thomas P. 

Wells, Milford 

Werkowitz, Jack 

Whedbee, Melville 

White, James, "Pete" __ 

Wigginton, Al, Sr. 

Willev, Harold 

Williams, Bert O. 

Williams, James H. 

Williams, Reid V. 

Williams, Roy E. 

Wilson, Jack R. 

Wilson, John Pope 

Winfrey, Shelby 

Womack, William H. __ 
Wurtz, Emil 



Excel 

4 

4 

5 

7 

8 

1 

2 

5 

5 


12 

5 

2 



1 

1 





1 

2 

4 

9 

1 

1 

1 

2 

6 
16 
11 

5 
14 





Good 


Fair 


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Poor 


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3 





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1 





1 . 




1 
1 






NATIONAL FEDERATION MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 
zone; (c) interior linemen of the line of scrimmage 
making normal non-deceptive movements after hav- 
ing hand on or near the ground; and (a) scoring one 
point for a successful point-after-touchdown try. 
Over 4800 of the returns endorsed the mandatory 
replacement of an injured player for at least one 
down when the clock is stopped or the ready-for- 
play signal is delayed for him. A majority of ap- 
proximately 759;' favored requiring each player to 
wear a face protector. 2023 (35%) would require 
the player to use a mouth protector. 

The simplification and orderly arrangement of 
rules as in the National Alliamce Code are, accord- 
ing to the questionnaire report, becoming more 
widely understood and appreciated. 

AUTHORIZED RULES REVISIONS 

Diagram Page 4: The field and equipment dia- 
grams will show the conect placement of flexible 
shafted corner flags at each intersection of the 
sideline and goal line. The placement of bdth play- 
ers' benches on the same side of the field will also 
be noted indicating that each coaches' box in such 
situations extends from the 20 to the 45 yardline. 

1-5-1: Additional emphasis will be given to the 
desirability of having players wear both mouth and 
face protectors to ensure maximum protection. 

3-4-4: The levision will make it manifestly 
clear that an injured or apparently injured player 
must be removed from the game for at least one 
down. 

4-2-1: "The Referee" will be replaced with "An 
Official," making it clear any Official may cause 
the ball to remain dead when a foul occurs early 



enough to give reasonable chance for the whistle 
to prevent snap or free-kick. 

7-5-6 Play (2): The first sentence of this play 
will be editorially revised specifying ineligible A2 
is illegally downfield. 

Heading Rule 9: This heading will be expanded 
to indicate the coverages pi-ovided by Rule 9. The 
heading will be: "Blocking, Use of Hand and Arm, 
Helping Runner." 

9-6-1-Note: For the purpose of additional em- 
phasis, the note will be expanded to direct Officials 
to be alert to any unsportsmanlike actions by a 
coach during the course of the game or during an 
intermission. The rewrite will require Officials to 
penalize promptly whenever there is unsportsman- 
like conduct. 

Rule 10-5-1: The article will be rewritten to 
the effect that a penalty measurement cannot take 
the ball more than half the distance from the en- 
forcement spot to the offending team's goal line. 
If the customary or ordinary distance penalty is 
greater than this, the ball is to be taken half-way 
from the enforcement spot to the goal line. 

Official's Signals: Signal 2 (Illegal Procedure) 
is to be used to designate illegal foi-ward hamdling 
of the ball. Signal 6 (Delay of Game) will include 
"Crawling." 

Summary of Penalties: Add as item 16 to list 
of 15-yard penalties: Pushing Runner, Interlocked 
Interference — 9-1-2 — ^Siginal 20. 

Official Play Rulings: Page 89, Rule Book 6, 
number 18. The second sentence of the ruling will be 
revised to state the penalty is automatically declined 
because the foul is during an advain.ce for a touch- 
down. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1959 



Page Seven 



ACTION ON INTERPRETATIONS 

1. The Committee confirmed the following in- 
terpretations: 

a. It is illegal coaching from the sideline to toss 
a tee onto the field to the offensive team unless the 
tee is requested by a player. 

b. It is legal for a substitute to carry a tee into 
the game. 

c. There is no infraction if a tee brought into 
the g-ame is placed on the ground and not used for 
a kick. 

d. A loose ball touching a properly-placed flag 
shaft is out-of-bounds from the end zone. 

2. The removal of Play 409A from the Case 
Book and Play 31 from Installment 11 of the 1958 
Early Season Football Questions was authorized. 

GENERAL 

1. It was voted to include the following items 
in the 1959 football questionnaire: 

a. Do you favor placing the goal post crossbar 
on the goal line ? 

b. Should ineligibles be permitted to move down- 
field as soon as the pass is in flight rather than 
when it is touched? 

c. Is it desirable to include as part of the play- 
ing rules a method of determining a winner if a 
regular game ends in a tie ? 

2. A motion to authorize the referee to make 
an equitable adjustmemt when a ball becomes dead 
because of an inadvertently blown whistle was 
thoroug-hly debated. It was suggested that "in such 
circumstances, the handicapped team be given the 
opportunity to replay the down." There was agi'ee- 
ment it would be difficult in most situations to 
determine which team was actually handicapped. 
The motioai was defeated. 

3. Restricting the use of kicking tees for free- 
kicks only was proposed but subsequently voted 
down by a substantial majority. 

4. A proposal to start the clock when a free- 
kick is touched was discussed but received only 
limited support because if it were adopted, it would 
doubtlessly be inadvisable to start the clock in 
case of a short free-kick. Therefore, any revision 
to eliminate possible present and future abuses 
would require the clock to start when R touched 
the ball or when the ball was touched if there were 
no foul. 

This was not considered workable. The sugges- 
tion that the clock start when the ball was "legally" 
touched provoked considerable debate and there was 
no agreement on a definition of "legally touching." 

5. Because 1 yard is such a short distance when 
compared with positions on the line, a motion re- 
quiring a backfield man (other than one under the 
snapper) to be at least 2 yards behind the line at 
the snap was offered. After considerable discussion 
concerning the possible effects of such a require- 
ment on the systems of play now popular, the mo- 
tion was lost. 

6. Increased use of the slot-back to block oppon- 
ents from the rear within the area of close line 
play (where clipping is not a foul), was reported to 
be causing many serious injuries. It was predicted 
an increasing number of offensive styles will incor- 
porate the maineuver and, as a result, an even great- 
er number of injuries will result. A motion requir- 
ing that player executing a block from the rear be 



no farther than 5 yards on either side of the snap 
and no more thain 2 yards behind the line of scrim- 
mage at the time of the snap was thoroughly de- 
baited but rejected. 

7. A resolution for the purpose of eliminating 
unsportsmanlike conduct on the part of coaches 
and those officially associated with a team and to 
discourage coaching from the sideline was adopted 
unanimously. The Editor was directed to secure as 
much publicity as possible concerning this matter 
in all publications and to urge increased vigilance 
on the part of Officials from the elimination of all 
phases of unsportsmanlike condudt. Toward this end, 
the use of all publicity media as well as rules and 
training publications was urged. 

8. The Committee authorized those states so 
desiring to experiment with: 

a. Placement of the goal post crossbar over the 
g-oal line. 

b. Rules for the breaking of tie games. Author- 
ization for experimentation will be granted to any 
group requesting it with the understanding that 
the experimenting group will submit reports of its 
experience to the proper Standing Committee. The 
considerable discussion concerning the methods of 
breaki'ng tie games was evidence that there are 
varying opinions concerning how and whether or 
not such games should be eliminated. Some feel it 
is necessary to eliminate tie games only in connec- 
tion with the championship series, others feel total 
yardage should determine the winners in case of a 
tie score and still another group believes any tie 
at the end of a regularly played game should be 
broken by an additional score. A minority indicated 
that on occasion, tie games are a satisfying ex- 
perience. 

9. The National Federation office was directed 
CO gather material concerning the various plans now 
used in several states for the elimination of tie 
games, to prepare a summary of these plans and to 
make the summary available to State Executive Of- 
ficers and to members of the Football Rules Com- 
mittee. 

10. Motions to consider legal football pants 
which carry a cleat cleaner and a hand glove with 
plastic cover were both lost by very substantial 
majorities. 

ll.A resolution commending the Official Sports 
Film Sei-vice for excellent service in preparing 
football film strips was unanimously approved. The 
development of a film strip library in which one 
strip would cover free-kick situations, amother 
scrimmage-kick situations, another forward passes, 
another illeg-al passes and another positions at the 
snap was recommended. It was suggested individual 
strips could be produced as time permitted in co- 
operatioin with the National Federation. 

12. By resolution, the Committee requested a 
tentative agenda including the major topics sche- 
duled to be considered by the Rules Committee and 
the questionnaire results be sent to members sevei-al 
days prior to the opening session so each repre- 
sentative would have an opportunity to study pos- 
sible proposals before the meeting convened. 

EIGHT-MAN RULES REVISIONS 

Rule 3: Quarters will be increased to 12 minutes. 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1959 



The Flying Dutchman 

From J. D. Raybuni, Superintendent of 
Providence Schools, comes the following 
letter to the Dutchman: 

We would like to nominate a student in 
our school (Providence High School) for the 
Game Guy Award of 1958-59. 

He is Maurice Jenkins, sixteen-year-old 
member of the Junior class. In September of 
1955 he was injured in a motorcycle accident. 
His left leg was shattered and broken. The 
doctor said that his leg was shattered just 
as a light bulb would shatter if you were to 
drop it on a concrete sidewalk. Now his left 
leg is shorter and smaller than his right leg. 
He has to walk on the toe or ball of his foot 
and limps considerably. He is still under the 
doctor's care and has to report to him every 
two months. 

In the fall of 1957 Maurice reported for 
football practice and was on the squad for 
the entire season. This fall he reported for 
football and broke into the starting lineup 
before the season was over. He beat a 260- 
pound center out of his position. 

Maurice is a member of the Beta Club. 
Out of a total of 16 semester grades, he has 
13 A's and 3 B's. I think you could classify 
him as an A student. He is also a member of 
the school chorus. 

Maurice has a very pleasing personality 
and gets along well with his fellow students 
and the faculty. So there is the description 
of our nomination, Maurice Jenkins, for the 
Game Guy Award of 1958-59. 

Johnny Haynes of Henderson has recom- 
mended that the Dutchman send a Corn Cob 
Pipe to Coach Jewell Logan of Charleston 
High School, Dawson Springs, and to Billy 
Birdwell, Principal of Slaughters High 
School. According to John these two gentle- 
men deserve the honor for countless unself- 
ish hours given to Kentucky youth and for 
outstanding courtesies to sports officials. 
Every time a Cob Pipe goes out it occurs to 
the Dutchman that great men never feel 
great and that small men never feel small. 

Basketball fever has now fully infected 
the Commonwealth and the only cure is an 
injection of top-notch school-boy basketball 
at the 1959 State Tournament. Kentucky has 
the greatest school-boy spectacle this writer 
has ever seen. It's a show that belongs to 
Kentucky and is dignified by hard play, fine 
displays of sportsmanship, and a tolerance 
between coaches and officials rarely seen 
any place. 




MAURICE JENKINS 

It's interesting to watch th new crops of 
outstanding athletes take the floor in the 
University of Kentucky's colossal colosseum. 
It is gratifying to us Kentuckians to watch 
the fight of these kids who will soon be our 
leaders. Good sound philosophy is developed 
in our state meets. The kids learn to keep 
facing the wind and fighting. Every school 
boy competitor should study the following 
philosophy before this year's tournaments. 

A tramp when asked his philosophy re- 
plied: "I turn my back to the wind." That's 
probably why he was a tramp. Following the 
line of least resistance is what makes rivers 
and many men crooked. A man cannot drift 
to success. 

In contrast consider the words that Cap- 
tain MacWhit spoke to his mate in Joseph 
Conrad's immortal tale of the sea, "Ty- 
phoon." In the midst of a great storm, Mac- 
Whit said: "Keep facing it! They may say 
what they like, the heaviest seas run with the 
wind. Always facing it. That's the way to 
get through." 

The trees that face the winds on the coasts 
become the straightest and tallest. From 
them are made the masts and spars of sail- 
ing ships. The scrubs grow in the protected 
valleys. Strength and power are built up 
through facing resistance. 

"Keep facing it" is a good motto for to- 
day. There is no sense in kidding ourselves ; 
wishful thinking must go. Whether the going 
is rough or smooth we can't turn back. We 
must keep plowing ahead into the storm. As 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1959 



Pag:e Nine 



we go in, facing whatever comes, we will 
grow in endurance and courage. We will win 
because we deserve to win. 

Good school boy philosophy reflects good 
school leadership. Dave Longenecker is high 
in his praises of the outstanding manner in 
which the Fern Creek invitational basket- 
ball tournament was conducted. In his third 
year of officiating this tournament, Dave 
says that he is amazed at the improvements 
and refinements added each year. He praises 
the hospitality and the spirit of fellowship 
which prevails over everything else. Kay 
Niman, Fern Creek Principal, may well take 
a bow for the reputation he is making for 
his county in the administration of this tour- 
nament. 

As we go to press the welcome news has 
come in that Cliff Fagan, Executive Secre- 
tary of the National Federation of High 
School Athletic Associations, and Johnny 
Carrico, popular sports writer of the Courier 
Journal, are leaving their hospital beds and 
are well on their ways to complete recoveries. 
Two finer gentlemen never lived. Their re- 
cuperation is the best news we could write. 

The telephone has just rung. Kenny Ar- 
nold, one of the state's leading basketball 
officials, was inviting the Dutchman to speak 
at the amiual Falls Cities Basketball Officials 
Association Banquet in March. Each year 
about two dozen such calls come in for ath- 
letic banquets and commencement speeches. 
The Dutchman regrets that he cannot ac- 
cept them all. Due to the pressure of his park 
and recreation job he must limit his speeches. 
His policy has always been to accept the 
first three commencement and the first three 
sports calls coming in. 

We live in a competitive world and it is 
important that our young people learn to 
compete vigorously on all kinds of athletic 
teams. It is a grave mistake, however, to 
overlook that a time will come when age 
will forbid strenuous team competition. Un- 
less we start placing strong emphasis on 
sports which have a "Carry-Over" value into 
later life, these youngsters face a dim future 
as spectators. Spectator interest is to be de- 
sired but good mental health in later years 
requires that recreational outlets, adaptable 
when the body functions slow down, be pro- 
vided. 

So it is that more emphasis must be placed 
all over the state on such sports as golf, 
swimming, bowling, hunting, and fishing. 
This summer the Dutchman played golf with 



a man 80 years of age who out-walked him 
all over the course and was living happily 
because he had learned a sport that had a 
strong carry-over value. In the thrill of team 
combat we must not forget the individual. 
The Dutchman closes out this column with 
a little more of Foster "Sid" Meade's quotes : 
"If it costs a dollar to keep a friend, keep 
the dollar. If it costs a friend to make a dol- 
lar, keep the friend." 



Films 



The films listed below are in the Film Library 
of the University of Kentucky Department of 
Extension. The Code letters "e,j,s,c,a" refer to 
elementary, junior high, senior high, college and 
adult audiences who may enjoy the particular film 
listed. The rental prices shown do not apply to 
schools which use one of the special subscription 
service plans, offered by the Bureau of Audio-Visual 
Material. 

Basketball 

BALL HANDLING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, 
$1.50 
Teaches fundamentals of basketball hamdling in- 
cluding stance, grip, control, adjustment before 
shooting, catching the ball, and other points. Pre- 
sents game sihots, using special photographic tech- 
niques to illustrate principles. 

BASKETBALL BY RUPP, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $2.50 

Animated play diagrams, slow motion photog- 
^■aphy, and action shots are combined in this new 
film prepared under the personal direction of Mr. 
Rupp especially for coaching use. Among the drills 
and plays covered in this film are: pivot man's slide 
into the basket; Play No. 6, the famous Kentucky 
Basket Maker; legal screening; penetrating zone 
defense; and the Kentucky fast break. 



BASKETBALL FOR MILLIONS, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 
This is the film for 1958-59, produced by the Of- 
ficial Sports Film Service under the sanction of 
the National Federation. A fantastic dream sequence 
where impossible and nightmarish situations can 
and do arise is the contimuity thread used throug-h- 
out the film to depict: Accepted officiating pi-oce- 
dures — problems created by double fouls and false 
double fouls — ^tricky situations connected with 
front and back court — jump ball infractions and 
procedures — ^little understood distinction between 
player and team control — and a panorama of basic 
i-ule fundamentals. 



BASKETBALL FUNDAMENTALS— INDIVIDUAL 
TECHNIQUES, j-s-e-a, 11/2 reels, $2.50 
Branch McCracken, Indiana University basketball 
coach, uses his team to demonstrate the fundamen- 
tals of basketball. Slow-motion photography is 
used to break the various court techniques down 
into easily grasped essentials. 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1959 



BASKETBALL KENTUCKY STYLE, j-s-c-a, 2 
reels, $2.50 (in state), $5.00 (out of state) 
This is the re\'ised edition of the fihn "Basketball 
By Rupp" prepared under the personal direction of 
Mr. Rupp especially for coaching use. 

BASKETBALL STRATEGY FOR GIRLS, j-s-c-a, 1 
reel, $1.50 
The basic strategy of offense play (fakes, rolls, 
cutting, screening, varying pace) and defense play 
(player to player, basic zone, shifting zone, triangle, 
and diagonal) is demonstrated and explained in this 
film. 

BASKETBALL TECHNIQUES FOR GIRLS, i-s-c-a, 

1 reel, $1.50 

Basic movement skills (running, starting, stop- 
ping, turning) passing (finger control, movement 
with the pass, leading the receiver, choice of the 
right pass), catching (side pass, high pass), shoot- 
ing- (finger control, arm extension, wrist flip, choice 
of the right shot), di-ibbhng, faking, and pivoting 
are demonstrated and explained in this film. 

BETTER BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, .3 reels, color, $.75 
TTiis film is produced by the Official Sports Film 
Sei-vice under the sanction of the National Federa- 
tion of State High School Athletic Associations. It 
demonstrates current rules and good officiating- 
procedure, with colorful action by skilled players. 

CARR CREEK VS. HENDERSON (1956) K.H.S. 

BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j- 

s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 
The final game of the 1956 State Basketball 
Tournament is shown in this film. Carr Creek High 
School defeated Henderson by a narrow margin, 
72 to 68, to "win the championship. 

CHAMPIONSHIP BASKETBALL— TEAM TECH- 
NIQUES, j-s, 1 reel, $1.50 
Man-to-man defense is shown, with the means 
best used under varying conditions. 

DEFENSIVE FOOTWORK IN BASKETBALL, 
j-s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 
Striding with an opponent, checking, maneuvering 
him out of position and other basic skills are illus- 
trated, using special photography to demonstrate 
points. Rebounding, pivoting, and correlated arm 
action are taught also. 

EASTERN VS. LAFAYETTE (1957) K.H.S. 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 
3 reels, color, $.75 
The final game of the 1957 K.H.S. State Touma- 
ment was played in Fi-eedom Hall at the Kentucky 
Fairgrounds and Exposition Center before a record 
crowd of 18,000. The final score was 56-52 as the 
Lafayette Generals won the crown for the fourth 
time. 

HAZARD VS. ADAIR COUNTY (1955) K.H.S. 
STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 
This is an excellent film of the game in which 
Hazard defeated Adair County by the score of 74-66 
for the championship. Johnny Cox bore the brunt 
of the attack by the champions while all-state play- 
ers, Ralph Shearer and Terry Randall, were best 
for Adair County. The presentation of all awards 
and trophies for the tournament is shown also. 



HIGHLIGHTS OF 1956 STATE BASKETBALL 
TOURNAMENT, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, sound, $.75 
Interesting scenes of events during the tourna- 
ment are shown in this film. Action shots of the 
crowd, cheerleaders, and bands are shown in addi- 
tion to a part of the play in each tournament game. 

KING BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

The official i-ules for the 1953-54 seasoin are in- 
terpreted in this film. In addition, play situations 
are demonstrated by members of the Shawnee Mis- 
sion basketball team, finalists in the Kansas State 
Hig-h School Tournament. Particular skills are 
shown by Robin Freeman, jump shot artist, who 
averaged thirty points a game for Hughes High 
School, Cincinnati; Wade Holbrook, a 7 foot % 
inch giant from the Portland, Oregon, State High 
School champions; and Chuck Darling, Ail-Ameri- 
can center from the University of Iowa.. 

NEWPORT VS. INEZ (1954) K.H.S. BASKETBALL 
TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, 
silent, $.75 
This is the final game of the 1954 State Basketball 
Tournament, in which Inez defeated Newport by 
the score of 63-55. The sparkling play of Newport's 
Redmon, and Inez's Cassady and Triplett, is the 
highlight of the film. The three players were select- 
ed as members of the All-State Team. 



PADUCAH TILGHMAN VS. LEXINGTON LA- 
FAYETTE (1953) K.H.S. BASKETBALL 
TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, 
silent, $.75 
This is the final game of the 1953 State Basket- 
ball Tournament in which Lafayette High of Lex- 
ington, Kentucky defeated Paducah Tilghman of 
Paducah, Kentucky, by the score of 84-53. This 
film shows the supei-ior play of two very excellent 
teams. 

RUPP'S FUNDAMENTALS OF BASKETBALL, 
j-s-c-a, 1 reel, silent, $1.25 
Coach Rupp's University of Kentucky Wildcats 
(1949-50) demonstrate ten different plays in such 
a clear manner that it is easy to follow and leara 
each play. 

ST. XAVIER VS. DAVIESS CO. (1958) K.H.S. 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j- 
s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 
St. Xavier High School of Louisville won the 1958 
State Basketball Tournament by defeating Daviess 
County of Owensboro, 60-49, in the final game of 
the tournament at the University of Kentucky 
Coliseum. 

SHOOTING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 
Concentrating on the set shot, this film pictures 
the action of the throw, stance, aim, trajectory, and 
fingertip control. Special attention is given total 
body coordination, especially inward rotation of the 
hand and arm making the throw. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1959 



Page Eleven 



Swimming 

AQUATIC ARTISTRY, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The film presents a diving- exhibition by Har- 
old Smith, an Olympic champion. Slow motion 
photography brings out clearly various points in 
Smith's techniques. 

BEGINNING SWIMMING, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Throug-h scenes photographed both above and be- 
neath the surface of the water, basic techinques of 
swimming for beginners are demonstrated. Land 
and water drills involving kicking, breathing, float- 
ing, paddling, and stroking and pulling with the arm 
are practiced separately, then coordinated as the 
swimmer learns the American crawl. The back float, 
back stroke, and breast stroke are also illustrated 
and explained. 

BREAST STROKE, SIDE STROKE, AND UNDER- 
WATER SWIMMING, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 
This film presents the conventional breast stroke, 
timing the strokes, and the kick. 

CRAWL STROKE, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The basic principles of the stroke are presented 
in this film. The arm stroke, the kick, and the 
breathing are demonstrated. This film also includes 
clow motion shots under water. 

DIVING FUNDAMENTALS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

After a brief history of the sport of diving, the 
following- points are explained and demonstrated: 
The hurdle jump, determining the correct distance, 
proper arm action, correct way of landing on the 
feet, proper takeoff and lift, correct entry into the 
water. The backward dive is also taught, including 
lift, ai'ching the body, and entry into the water. 
The motion is stopped at various points to enable 
detatiled study of form. 

DOLPHIN KICK, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

An excellent swimmer, an underwa'^ex camera, 
and carefully devised teaching- demonstrations in- 
troduce the new swimming technique known as the 
dolphin or fish-tail kick. Analyzing the body move- 
ments used in the dolphin kick, the film stresses 
the importance of practice for mastery of this ef- 
ficient speedy kick. 

1953 KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL A. A. SWIM- 
MING MEET, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, silent, $.75 
This film shows the finals of all events in the 
1953 State Swimming Meet. The individual divers 
are included. St. Xavier was the winner in Class A, 
Berea Foundation in Class B, and Newport in Class 
C. 

1955 KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL A. A. SWIM- 
MING MEET, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, silent, $.75 
Hig-hlights of the meet and championship heats 
are shown im the film. St. Xavier of Louisville won 
the Class A title for the ninth consecutive year. 
University High of Lexington won the Class B and 
Bellevu© the Class C. 

SWIM AND LIVE, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Men of the Army Air Forces at Miami are taught 
to swim from floating to swimming through burn- 
ing oil. The film is useful for pre-induetion instruc- 
tion and for safety classes as well as for general 
programs. 



Postscripts on Athletics 

The statement is frequently made that 
athletics, especially football and basketball, 
are incompatible with good scholarship and 
that they lower the standard of scholarship 
for both the participants and the general 
level of the school. Research does not bear 
out these statements as in all of the statistics 
which this writer has been able to locate 
in this area, the conclusion points to just 
the opposite. 

Several Master's theses have been written 
in the area as to whether students partici- 
pating in athletics have their academic grades 
increased or decreased through this partic- 
ipation. In every thesis the conclusions have 
been the same ; that is that the grades made 
by students who participate in athletics are 
higher while they are participating in ath- 
letics than when they are not participating 
in athletics. Regardless of whatever reasons 
that might be presented, the records show 
that students participating in athletics do 
better while they are engaging in athletics 
than when they are not participating in 
athletics. 

Overall Grades 

The statement that the general academic 
level of the student body as a whole is lower 
during football or basketball season is not 
justifiable in the light of research on this 
matter. This writer has not been able to 
locate any specific data relating to this 
specific factor as related to overall student 
grades; but semi-scientific studies made over 
a selected group of high schools indicate 
that grades for the overall student body are 
as good, perhaps a little better, when a school 
has a good athletic season, regardless of 
whether it is in football, basketball or base- 
ball. 

There are so many factors involved in the 
overall student averages that to say that 
any one factor affects the entire student 
body to such an extent that it causes a mark- 
edly lower student academic achievement is 
very indefensible from a scientific viewpoint. 
Good Students 

Typical of the fact that football does not 
interfere with the academic achievements of 
athletes is illustrated by a typical state 
championship football team this year, the 
Angleton "Wildcats." Out of eleven starting 
players, eight belong to the National Honor 
Society, and the co-captains, Randy Curson 
and Bill Schweinle, are rivals for valedic- 
torian of the senior class for this year. The 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1959 



Angleton group has been given as an illus- 
tration not because the same is not true of 
most other championship teams but because 
the facts happened to be available on the 
scholastic ability for this team. 
For the Record 

Throughout this past autumn, we have had 
the usual spate of magazine stories deploring 
the overemphasis of football. Soon it will be 
basketball that is on the pan ; one author has 
already taken the entire state of Indiana to 
task for giving high school basketball the 
status of a "folk art." The premise of vir- 
tually all the overemphasis stories is that 
football (or basketball) is incompatible with 
good scholarship. 

Not True 

But the idea that sports have had a per- 
nicious influence on scholastic standards is 
ridiculous on its face. Only a few students 
play the taxing team sports — and the in- 
centive for these few to stay off probation 
in order to remain eligible for the big games 
must be great. For the rest, if Johnny can't 
read, it is because he hasn't learned phonetics 
in the second grade. If he can't write, it is 
because the "true-false" question has re- 
placed the essay in his classes. And if he 
can't apply logic and realism to the problems 
of economics and politics, it is because his 
text books have ceased to tell him that things 
operate by natural, not political law. 
Confused 

For my sins, I have read a goodly number 
of economics textbooks. Most of them of- 
fer hodgepodge of mutually contradictory 
theories. Inflation, for example, is deplored 
— but the political actions which make for 
inflation are considered necessary and right. 
Caught between the incompatibles of the 
textbooks, the student often loses all contact 
with a cause-and-effect world. 
Lifelike 

In football, this does not happen. On the 
playing field a cause is always demonstrably 
folowed by an effect: if a backfield man 
misses his signal, or starts moving too soon, 
the result is an unholy mess. Day after day, 
on a hundred fields throughout the autumn, 
such things as the relationship of the input 
of energy and skill to the output of success- 
ful achievement get their inexorable demon- 
stration. There can be no fudging, no fak- 
ing, no disregard of fundamentals, no day- 
dreaming, if one aspires to play on a well- 
organized and well-drilled football team. 
Values 

In short, athletics teaches many valuable 



things, ranging from discipline to the proper 
adaptation of means to ends. Stupid boys 
don't get on in football ; the game is too com- 
plex for that. As for the coaches? Unpro- 
tected by academic "tenure," they must de- 
liver, too. Far from being overemphasized, 
football may be the schools' most enduring 
contact with the world of discipline of sharp 
thinking, of a demonstrable connection be- 
tween what one puts into a thing and what 
one gets out of it at the other end. Let's 
have more of it. 

— Dr. Rhea H. Williams, 
Texas Interscholastic Leager. 



The 1959 Track and Field Rules 

RULES REVISIONS, most of which are 
of a minor nature, are outlined in the new 
edition of the Track and Field Rules Book. 

RULES 2-2: The meet director should 
designate a Head Judge of the Finish, a Head 
Field Judge, a Head Inspector and a Head 
Timer. 

RULES 2-3 : No new record can be estab- 
lished if there is a tailwind in excess of the 
stated maximum at any time during the 
performance. This makes it necessary for 
the operator of the wind guage to make con- 
tinuous observation. Heretofore, it was com- 
mon practice to read the wind guage once 
near the time of the performance. 

RULE 3-11: If the watch hand is between 
dial marks, the lower reading is used. 

RULE 8-4: A baton may be of any type 
of material provided weight and size are as 
specified in the rules. 

RULE 9-1 : Jumpers are prohibited from 
wearing a shoe which contains any type of 
spring or which has a sole of a thickness 
greater than Vo inch. 

For distances of less than 100 feet, the 
smallest unit of measurement shall be V4, 
inch. For distances of 100 feet or more, the 
smallest unit of measurement will be 1/2 inch. 

RULE 9-6 : After throwing the discus, the 
thrower must leave from the rear half of 
the circle. This is similar to the shot put re- 
quirement. 

SITUATION RULINGS: New or revised 
situations include: 56; 541; S41 (a); S52 
(c) ; and S59(c). These are designed to as- 
sist in matters such as when a runner may 
move toward the pole in a mile relay, the 
circumstances under which it counts as a 
trial even though a pole vaulter's feet do 
not leave the ground and the right of the 
Games Committee to require use of imple- 
ments provided by them. 



HUNT'S 

For Those in a Hurry 

For those last minute needs for tournament play and for the last few 
games before tournaments we have our warehouses full and ready to ship. 
And REMEMBER our motto: 

"WE SHIP THE DAY YOU BUY" 

FAIR-PLAY SCOREBOARDS 

No. FISS Tick-A-Way and Dial Types No. FD60 in Stocli. 

CONVERSE ALL STAR BASKETBALL SHOES 

All sizes from 5 thru 17 in Stock either white or black uppers. 

BASKETBALLS 

Our No. AFR endorsed and used by Coach Adolph Rupp and the University 

of Kentucky Wildcats. 

MacGregor' No. XIOL Last Bilt. 

Both of these balls will be used in the 1959 K.H.S.A.A. State Tournament 

in Lexingrton. 

We also have the Spalding No. 100 and Spalding No. PLIO. 

AWARD SWEATERS AND JACKETS 

We have HUNT'S, O'Shea and Butwin jackets, HUNT'S and O'Shea 
sweaters in stock. Speedy lettering service. 

CRAMER AND BIKE WEB 

Training and First-Aid Supplies. 

OFFICIAL'S EQUIPMENT 

We have a complete stock of equipment of all types for the man in the 
white and black stripes. 

GLASS, STEEL AND WOOD RECTANGULAR & FAN SHAPED BANKS 

All complete with goals and nets. Contact us for prices. 

ADMISSION TICKETS 

All denominations of tickets available and in stock. Two thousand to roll 
and five colors available at $1.25 per roll. Ticket punchers omly 60c. 

TROPHIES AND AWARDS 

Third place trophies and awaixls for Most Valuable and All Tournament 
Teams. Speedy delivery complete with engraving. 

We only wish that every school in Kentucky could send its team as a partici- 
pant to the 1959 Basketball Tournament. Best of luck to the 16 teams who 
finally make it. 

All of you who will be in Lexington at State Tournament Time come and 
see us. Our display will be, as usual, in Room 463 at the Phoenix Hotel. 
We will be looking for you. 

Hunt's Athletic Goods Co. 

INCDRPORATED 

Phone 103 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH 





WHILE you ARE IN LEXINGTON 

FOR THE 

State Basketball Tournament 

Visit Our Sample Rooms 
Phoenix Hoteh Rooms 461-462 



YOU are cordially invifed to join the happy 
throng of players . . . coaches . . . fans . . . celebrities 
. . . school and factory representatives who make our 
special Sample Room their meeting place and head- 
quarters during the Tournament. 

YOUR traveling Kentucky school representatives: 
Bob Reis, Harry Blackburn and Chuck Shuster, Al Le 
Comte and John Head will be there to greet you. 

It will be our pleasure to show you the new 1959 
nationally advertised football and basketball equip- 
ment, honor sweaters, 
and award jackets. 





High School Afhiefe 



ATHERTON HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS "A" CHAMPION— 1959 





(Left to Right) Front Row: Bader, Mowen, Frieberg, Liebschutz, 
Sturgeon, Craddock, Mgr. Ford, Coach Beard. Second Row: Morrison, 
McLaughlin, Snow, Peterson, Dennis, Metcalf, Daniels, Co-Captain Monroe. 
Third Row : Davis, Roof, Kurrie, Wells, Akin, Barr, King, Bush, Co-Captain 
Lawrence. 



Omcial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
MARCH - 1353 



if^ 



Modern Ides of March 



The gym lights gleam like a beacon beam 
And a million motors hum 

In a good will flight on a Friday night; 
For basketball beckons, "Com.e!" 



A sharp-shootino: mite is king tonight. 

The Madness of March is running. 
The winged feet fly, the ball sails high 

And field goal hunters are gunning. 



The colors clash as silk suits flash 
And race on a shimmering floor. 

Repressions die, and partisans vie 
In a goal acclaiming roar. 



On Championship Trail toward a holy grail, 
All fans are birds of a feather 

It's fiesta night and cares lie light 
When the air is full of leather. 



Since time began, the instincts of man 
Prove cave and current men kin. 

On tournament night the sage and the wight 
Are relative under the skin. 



It's festival time,— sans reason or rhyme 
But with nation-wide appeal. 

In a world of hate, our ship of state 
Rides high on an even keel. 



With war nerves tense, the final defense 
Is the courage, strength and will 

In a million lives where freedom thrives 
And liberty lingers still. 



Let commies clash and empires crash 
'Neath the wreck of a victory arch! 

Let our boys tread where hate is dead, — 
In this happj' Madness of March ! 

— H. V. Porter. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXI— NO. 8 



MARCH, 1959 



.00 Per Year 



How About Football ? 

The question often asked by parents is 
whether or not they should allow their boy 
to participate in junior or senior high school 
football programs. Another question which 
frequently rises is whether it is better for a 
student to make "A" marks than to put in 
extra time in athletics which might possibly 
lower his grades. The Hopkins Syndicate, 
Inc., quoted in the Texas Leaguer, gives the 
reply to these questions made by Dr. George 
W. Crane, M.D., Ph.D., who is an outstand- 
ing authority in the field of medicine, psy- 
chology and psychiatry, to a mother who 
asked the questions: 

"Football is not a dangerous sport when 
played under the supervision of school 
coaches and with proper equipment. As 
Coach Lynn Waldorf so tersely stated a few 
years ago, if the same number of teen-agers 
were NOT practicing for football, more of 
them would be injured or killed, as in auto 
accidents, than are hurt on the gridiron. 
Nowadays, thanks to dental aids, hardly a 
single player even chips a tooth during the 
entire football season. And the few injuries 
that occur are usually sprained ankles or 
maybe a broken leg — not fatal injuries. 

"So you doting mothers must learn to be 
philosophical and think of the best interest 
of your sons. Football teaches them play. It 
also gives the boys excellent physical drill, 
which in itself is admirable health insurance 
for longer life. And it meanwhile broadens 
the boy's perspective so he is not a narrow, 
horn-rimmed glasses introvert all his life 
with little contact with reality. We'd have 
far better teachers and preachers if they 
had all played football or engaged in other 
competitive athletics during high school and 
college. 

"Our medical and dental colleges are be- 
ginning to realize, too, that a "B" student 
who has a well-rounded personality from ath- 
letics and social leadership on the campus, 
is usually superior to an "A" student who 
has a shut-in personality. Besides, I am not 
joking regarding the health insurance that 



athletics offers. Heart trouble is now the 
Number One cause of death in America, pro- 
ducing three times as many fatalities as all 
forms of cancer combined. An athlete tends 
to have a larger heart, which means his two 
coronary arteries are likewise bigger. Thus, 
as the coronary arteries grow thicker from 
hardening, due to old age, they don't get 
plugged as readily. For when a tiny blood 
clot flows along a coronary artery, it is not 
as likely to plug up the artery if the latter is 
larger. So please remember that exercise, 
especially running and distance swimming, 
produce larger hearts. 

"The heart of the athlete doesn't beat 
as fast as the heart of the non-athlete. A 
2-miler may thus have a normal pulse rate 
of only 66, instead of 72. His larger heart 
thus gets 6 additional rest periods or 
"heart naps" every minute: Since he doesn't 
race his human "motor" as fast as does the 
non-athlete, it doesn't wear out as rapidly. 
So encourage your children to build up more 
rugged hearts during youth, especially if 
they maintain a "B" average meanwhile in 
tneir studies. Athletic coaches also veto 
liquor and tobacco, so your sons benefit 
from that positive instruction, too." 

Superintendent Ben Flora of Mt. Sterling 
believes that the sport of football can offer 
much to the high school program. In a re- 
cent letter written to the State Office of the 
K.H.S.A.A., Mr. Flora says : 

"There is no need for any controversy 
developing between high school football and 
basketball coaches as a result of the recent 
decision to stage championship play-offs late 
in November in Kentucky. Football as a sport 
and physical developer is too important to 
our national defense to think of taking it 
and its opportunities away from boys of 
high school age. 

"Football is the one real defense left to 
present-day youth and the soft American life 
brought on by the present-day economic 
situation. We should not do anything to take 
it out of the schools. If anything, we should 
have more and more of it. It's a real give and 
take sport with great character building 
(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1959 



MARCH, 1959 



VOL. XXI— NO. 8 



ANNUAL MEETING SPEAKER 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60). Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61). Marion 

Directors— W. B. Jones, (1957-61) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
(1958-62) Franklin: Jack Dawson (1958-62). Louisville: Robert 
P. Forsythe (1956-59). Greenville: K. G. Gillaspie (1955-59). 
Georgetown: Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



irom 



the Ci 



omniissionei s 



Offi. 



ice 



Reports Now Due 

1. 1958-59 Basketball Participation List 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



Spring Meets 

Tentative dates have been set for the var- 
ious spring meets and tournaments in base- 
ball, golf, track, and tennis. They are as 
follows : 

May 11, regional tennis tournaments 
May 12-14, district baseball tournaments 
May 15-16, regional track meets 
May 18-19, State Tennis Tournament 
May 20. regional golf tournaments 
Mav 22-2S. State Track Meet 
May 25-2^. State Golf Tournament 
May 27-28. reo'iona] baseball tournaments 
June 3-4, State Baseball Toui-nament 

Board Election 

Superintendent Robert P. Forsvthe of 
Hreenville. in Section 2 and Sunerintendent 
Kenneth G. G'llpsnie of Geort^ftown in Sec- 
tion 5, were unocnospd for reelection to mem- 
bership on the K.H.SA.A. Board of Control. 
Articles concerning the reelected directors 
will appear in the April issue of the maga- 
zine. 

Protection Fund News 

Three hundred twentv-six member schools 
of the K.H.S.A.A. had insured their athletes 
with the Protection Fund at the time this 
issue of the maorazine went to press. Nine 
hundred twentv-one claims, totaling $22,- 
274.11, have been paid since July 1, 1958. 




Philip Davidson 

Dr. Philip Davidson, President of the 
University of Louisville, will be the principal 
speaker at the annual dinner meeting of the 
K.H.S.A.A. scheduled to be held in the Cry- 
stal Ballroom of the Brown Hotel, Louisville, 
at 6:00 P. M., April 16. The subject of Dr. 
Davidson's address will be "Academics and 
Athletics." 

Dr. Davidson was born in Omaha, Nebras- 
ka, on May 28, 1902. His father was an 
Episcopal clergyman. The family moved to 
Greenville, Mississippi in 1906, where the 
father was rector of St. James Parish until 
his retirement in 1941. The mother still lives 
in Greenville. 

In 1922 Dr. Davidson graduated from the 
University of Mississippi. He taught in Mis- 
sissippi county high schools from 1922 to 
1925, when the received his M.A. degree. In 
1925 he went to the University of Illinois 
where he taught in the history department 
for two years while working on his doctorate 
at the University of Chicago. He received 
his Ph.D. degree in 1929. In 1928 he went 
to Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Georgia, as 
head of the History Department. He remain- 
ed there until 1942 when he went to Vander- 
bilt University as Dean of the Graduate 
School. He remained at Vanderbilt until 
1951, when he became President of the Uni- 
versity of Louisville. 

Dr. Davidson is a member of Phi Beta 
Kappa, Omicron Delta Kappa, and Board of 
Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foun- 
dation. In Louisville he is a member of the 
Norton Infirmary Psychiatric Council, mem- 
ber of the Board of Directors of the Louis- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1959 



Page Three 



ville Fund, member of the Board of Directors 
of the Louisville Philharmonic Society, and 
member of the Board of Directors of the 
J. B. Speed Museum. He was General Chair- 
man for Brotherhood Week in Kentucky 
(National Conference of Christians and 
Jews) in 1954 and 1959. He is a member of 
the Louisville Rotary Club, and a member of 
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church. He received 
the honorary degree of Doctor of Literature 
from the University of the South, June, 1954. 



Films 



The films listed bcli 
ment of Extension, U 
shown do not apply to 
subscription service pla 
Visual Materials. 



I the Film Library of the Depart- 

ity of Kentucky. The rental prices 

hools which use one of the special 

offered by the Bureau of Audio- 



Track 



The Broad Jump, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Controlled speed — timing and coordination — de- 
velopment of legs and torso — mobility of pelvis and 
hips, one, two, three style — foot roll — single and 
triple air stride — soft versus hard take off — arm 
position. 

Discus, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Principle of centrifugal force — muscle develop- 
ment for side arm throw — grips — ^finger roll — heel 
of thumb pressure — finger exercises — clockwise 
spin — hip snap — reverse and non-reverse styles. 

Disltance Races, s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Races from 1,000 to 10,000 meters and steeplechase 
are demonstrated. Style of distance runner is con- 
trasted with that of dash man. Differences in 
typical physiques are shown. Slow motion photo- 
graphy is used to analyze movements. 

Distances, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Style — developing stamina — calisthenics — avoiding 
shin splint — controlled tension — forward knee reflex 
— straight line running — ^automatic stride. 

The High Jump, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Belly roll or straddle and improved Western style 
— body lean and reverse — approach — body tension — 
coordination of arm and leg action. 

The Hurdles, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic hurdling styles — rear hip and leg actioin — 
rhythmic running — hurdling calisthenics — ^body bal- 
ance — correct clearance — circular stepover action — ■ 
adapting styles of physiques. 

The Javelin, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Four stage catapult throw — preliminary run — 
concluding stride — throwing stance — throwing and 
reverse — alternative hand and finger grips — facing 
position — balance of stomach and back muscle ten- 
sion — throwing angle — ^body and leg coordination 
drills — ^flexibility exercises. 

Jumps and Pole Vault, s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Demonstraltions from actual competition are 



shown for running high-jump; running broad- jump; 
hop, step and jump; and pole vault. Slow motion 
photography is used for detailed study of form. 

1954 Kentucky High School A. A. Track Meet, 
j-s-c-a, 2 reels, silent, $.75 

Portions of the state meet are presented in this 
film. Several of the qualifying events are shown 
with the finals of all the track and field events. 
Lafayette High School won the title with 41 1/3 
points, Ashland was second and Henry Clay third. 

1955 Kentucky High School A. A. Track Meet, 
j-s-c-a, 4 i-eels, silent, $.75 

The finals of all the track and field events are 
shown as Ashland High School won the meet with 
26 points. Tilghman High School of Paducah was 
second with 20 1/4 points. New records were set in 
the Mile Run, Mile Relay, and Discus. 

Middle Distances, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Sprinting techniques — ball of foot running — auto- 
matic stride — penaulum and bicycle stride — exex'cise 
— counter balanced arm action — push drive — jockey- 
ing for position. 

Pole Vault, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic vaulting principles — importance of exercises 
— running action — grip — selecting the pole — ^take- 
off — Western and Easitern style — slotting — novice 
training. 

The Relays, j-s-c-a. 1 reel, $1.50 

Passing — visual pass — blind pass — right and left 
exchange — merging of runners' speed^ — baton grips 
— relay starts, underhand action — cup style — over- 
hand sprint pass — ^fly scoop — practice and team 
work. 

Shot Put, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Fitting style to physiques — tension control — one, 
two, three rhythm — exercise — finger and hand grip 
— finger and wrist snap — ^foot positions — progressive 
tension and effort — explosive hip srnap. 

The Sprints, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $2.50 

Fundamentals of 100 yard and 200 yard dash — 
impact style and natural stretch stride — synchro- 
nizing leg and arm action — conditioning exercises — 
starting techniques — slow motion of muscular utili- 
zation and coordination. 

Baseball 

Baseball All-Star Game of 1956, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
color, $.75 

The All-Star Game of 1956 was played in Griffith 
Stadium at Washington. Stars of the American and 
National League are pictured in action during the 
pre-game activities. Highlights of the game are 
shown as the National League wins by a score of 
7-3. 

Baseball By The Code, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $.75 
This picture gives an official interpretation of 
the rules and a demonstration of game administra- 
tion by Umpires from the Major and Minor Leagnes. 
Play situations are demonstrated by high school, 
college, and professional players. Correct pitching 
procedure, interference and obstruction, live and 
dead ball, trap plays, infield fly, and strike zone are 
illusitrated. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1959 



Batting Fundamentals, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic skills which must be mastered before one 
becomes an accomplished hitter. Bat selection, 
stance, grip, stride, swing and follow-through are 
clearly demonstrated in this film by professional 
players. 

The Batting Stars of Baseball, s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 
Who are the big names among battei-s and what 
makes them good? Watch the featured hitters as 
shown in this film, learn the secrets of their styles 
and forms, and try it yourself. For clubs as well as 
classes. 

Catching in Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The basic skills in catching baseball are presented 
in this film. How to caltch a high rapid ball, a batted 
ball, a thrown ball, and a ground ball are shown. 
Stance, footwork, and body balance are described. 
Slow motion and close-up photography are used to 
enable the viewer to follow each step or movemeint 
in each of the basic skills. 

Catching Stars of Baseball, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

This is a film designed to assist in the coaching 
of catchers but it is also interesting and entei-tain- 
ing. Correct methods and techniques of receiving, 
throwing, signalling and fielding are illustrated by 
Bill Dickey, Sherman Lollar, Yogi Berra and Roy 
Campanella. 

Democracy of Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

The purpose of this film is for further develop- 
ment of young baseball players in our modem 
democracy and illustrates this through sports and 
sports competition. This film includes a brief his- 
tory of baseball along with a cavalacade of past and 
present stars. 

Double-Play Kings of Baseball, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 
This film presents an analysis of the double play 
in baseball. Different players from several major 
leagues are shown in action. Fielding, tagging, and 
throwing are illustrated and explained. 

Hitting in Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion and close-up photography are used 
to follow accurately and graphically the basic fun- 
damentals of hitting in baseball. Coordination of 
feet, legs, hips, shoulders, arms, and head is ex- 
plained. How to select a bat, how to hold it, aind 
correct batting position are shown. 

Infield Play at 1st and 3rd, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 
The fundamentals and finer points of infield 
play at first and third base are illustrated by big 
league players. Fielding, stance, throwing, tagging 
runners, etc., pictured, often in slow motion. Spon- 
sored by A. G. Spalding Co., The American and Na- 
tional Leagues. 

Inside Baseball, j-s, 3 reels, $1.00 

Fundamentals of baseball, including pitching, 
batting, fielding and base-running, are demonstrated. 

1953 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, b&w, color, $.75 

This film has some shots from each of the 
games played in the tournament. A large part of 
the final game, St. Joseph vs. Jenkins, is presented. 
The daytime games were filmed in color. 



1954 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, b&w, color, $.75 

This film shows the first inning of each game 
played in the tournament at Parkway Field, in 
Louisville, Kentucky. Several innings of the final 
game between Newport Catholic and Louisville Male 
are shown. The pictures of daytime play are in 
color. 

1955 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, b&w, color, $.75 

duPont Manual defeated Hall High School for the 
championship by a score of 13-3. All the final game 
is shown in color. 

1956 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, $.75 

Group pictures and action shots of the eight 
teams in the tournament are shown in the film. 
Also included are the first innings of the semi- 
final games and four innings of the final game 
between Newport Catholic and Murray. 

1957 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, color, $.75 

duPont Manual defeated Owensboro High for 
the champioinship by a score of 8-3. All of the final 
game is shown in color. 

Modern Baseball, j-s-c-a, 3 I'eels, color, $.75 

This film deals mainly with the rales of the 
game. It presents various infractions of the i"ules 
and the results of errors made in the game. 

Pitching Stars of Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Shows four of the leading pitchers in action. Types 

of pitches and methods for practice are portrayed. 

Play Ball, Son, j-s, 1% reels, $2.50 

Joe Cronin introduces this film, showing a group 
of fourteen-year-old boys who are experts in base- 
ball. Correct methods of hitting, catching, and 
throwing are demonstrated in natural and slow 
motion. Based on book by Bert V. Dunne. 

Throwing in Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion, close-up and stop photography are 
used in presenting the basic fundamentals of thi'ow- 
ing in baseball. Instructions are given for the over- 
head, three-quarter side, side, and underhand 
throws. Coordination of foot and arm motion is 
stressed, as well as coordination of the body as a 
whole. 

Touching All Bases, j-s-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

This film is intended to teach youngsters baseball 
by showing various American League stars playing 
their positions. It is also intended to give fans as a 
whole a better understanding and knowledge of the 
national pastime. The film shows Father Flanagan 
and his Boys Town Team, the Hall of Fame cere- 
monies in Cooperstown, New York, and scenes from 
night baseball games. 

The Umpire in Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Summarizes importance of the umpire to the 
baseball game. Explanation of the duties of umpire 
and also qualifications for job, showing where they 
receive their training. 

World Series of 1952, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

The two teams playing were the Brooklyn 
Dodgers of the National League and the New York 
Yankees of the American. The Yankees won the 
championship and were again the world's champions 
after a long and exciting series. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1959 



Page Five 



World Series of 1953, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $.75 

This is the fiftieth anniversary of World Series 
games betrween the American and the National 
Leagues. The two teams participating were the 
Brooklyn Dodgers of the National League and the 
New York Yankees of the American League. The 
Yankees retained the championship by winning the 
first, second, third and sixth games of the series. 

World Series of 1954, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

Highlig^hts of the games between the Cleveland 
Indians and the New York Giants are shown in this 
film. The Giants, sparked by the sensational hitting 
of Rhodes, defeated the Indians in four straight 
games. The Indians had set a record for the num- 
ber of games won in winning the American League 
Pennant. 

World Series of 1955, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $.75 

Exciting moments of the seven games between 
the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Yankees 
are shown in this film. The commentary leading up 
to each game makes the film interesting as the 
Dodgers win. the worird championship. 

World Series of 1957, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $.75 

The American League champion New York Yan- 
kees, carry the series the full seven games before 
bowing to the Milwaukee Braves, champion of the 
National League. The film catches most of the hit- 
ting and shows the plays in which runs were scored 
in each game. The nan-ator, Lew Fonseca, describes 
the play and fills in the background with interest- 
ing bits of information concerning the g-ames. 

Tennis 

Advanced Tennis, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

While working with a tennis pupil, Bill Tilden 
narrates and demonstrates, showing advamced tech- 
niques of tennis. 

Tennis Rhythm, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Bobby Riggs is shown winning national tennis 
championship of Forest Hills. Later, at his tennis 
school in Chicago, he demonstraites how to make 
various shots correctly — the grip, service, forehand 
drive, baickhand, etc., usi.ng regular speed and slow 
motion. 

Golf 

From Tee to Green, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, color, $.75 

The camera makes a tour of the Canadian golf 
courses from Newfoundland to Vancouver Island. A 
caddy starts out hitchhiking across Canada and 
stops at courses in each province to earn his way 
on by caddying for awhile. Final scenes are of 
Bing Crosiby enjoying a game at Jasper. Beautiful 
scenery. 

Saving Strokes with Sam Snead. s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 
Golf champion Sam Snead illustrates his gi'ip, 
his stance, his swing on each of several types of 
golf situations. Slow motion and "freeze" shots 
help to clarify the instruction. Shots with driver, 
brassie, and various irons for difficult lies are 
illustrated aind finally his putting technique is 
shown. 



What Is America? 

Overhead the clouds were gathering for 
a late afternoon storm. The sun in one of 
its more defiant moods nevertheless bathed 
the West Teichnical High School Stadium on 
W. 93rd St. with a mellow light. 

Under the nimble direction of indefatig- 
able George Seedhouse, hundreds of boys and 
girls lined up for the colorful Olympics march 
led by the buoyant band from Culver Military 
Academy. 

These boys and girls came from all parts 
of Greater Cleveland, from all kinds of 
homes, the rich and the poor, of all shades of 
skin, all religions — all gathered for one com- 
mon purpose to test their competitive skills 
and stamina against one another on the 
cinder track. 

I had left my office only a short time be- 
fore. The last thing I read before putting on 
my hat to drive out to West Tech was a let- 
ter from a national magazine. It said, in part : 

"Therefore, would you, at your earliest 
convenience, write for this special purpose 
a thousand words centered around the ques- 
tion, 'What is America?' This edition con- 
taining these six articles, will be distributed 
throughout both Europe and Asia." 

I stood in the center of the West Tech field 
with some of the officials, with Mayor An- 
thony Celebrezze, an Imigrant Italian boy 
who became chief executive of one of Amer- 
ica's great cities ; with Big Bill Willis, now 
a recreation official who for years at Ohio 
State and on the Browns was one of the na- 
tion's top football stars; with alert young 
businessmen like George Steinbrenner, and 
Jim Stouffer, Tom Clark and Charles 
Smythe ; with labor leaders, with workers on 
the assembly line in factories now officiat- 
ing at this great civic event for the youth 
of the community. 

Around me also were Eddie Finegan and 
George Kozak, and John Nagy, Charlie Hofe- 
lich, Carl Antel and Charlie Murphy and Joe 
Gallagher of the School Board, the Red Merri- 
dews and John FitzGeralds of Station WJW 
— stout backers of the Junior Olympics from 
the very beginning. All giving their time, 
their effort, their enthusiasm to this event 
for boys and girls. 

Was this part of the answer the magazine 
asked, "What is America?" Men dropping 
everything else to help this great event. 

Was it, also, the very gathering of boys 
and girls itself — drawn from every typical 
(Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1959 



The Flying Dutchman 

Good sports require good officiating. Ken- 
tucky's sports will only continue to improve 
as long as officiating continues to improve. 

Gradually, officials' associations are be- 
ginning to spread over the Commonwealth 
which is encouraging from the standpoint 
of the im.provement of sports officiating. 
Our aim for this year is the development of 
officials' associations in every county. 

A most energetic association, coming into 
existence recently, is the Jackson Purchase 
Officials Association with headquarters at 
Gilbertsville, Kentucky. According to Joe 
Fields, this association is a live-wire organi- 
zation aimed at cooperation with schools and 
at the improvement of officiating in Western 
Kentucky. 

Joe writes the Dutchman that his organi- 
zation is serving the first region so well that 
coaches and fans evaluate the officiating as 
much more uniform. Joe goes on to say that 
two of the Fourth Region coaches have com- 
mented that officiating in their region is 
improving all the time and is better this year 
than ever before. My old friend, Amos "The 
Swift One" Teague, and his association get 
some credit for this, too. 

This Jackson Purchase Officials Associa- 
tion meets on the first Monday of each month 
for a period of two hours and insists on each 
member official attending. Such attendance 
is important because many fans, coaches, 
and even new officiating aspirants little 
realize how much an arbiter has to know. 

The main accomplishment of an officials' 
association is the insistence that all officials 
courageously enforce the rules set up by 
the National Basketball Committee. An of- 
ficial called the Dutchman a few days ago 
to say that he did not like the stalling rule 
and that he was not going to call it. A good 
officials' association would have advised this 
gentleman quickly that he was not worthy of 
his whistle and to turn in his officiating card. 

Regardless of whether we like the rules 
handed down or not, we are honor bound to 
enforce them to the best of our ability. High 
sichool officials have a high-powered repre- 
sentative on the Rules Committee in the per- 
son of Cliff Fagan, Executive Secretary of 
the National Federation of State High School 
Athletic Associations. If coaches or officials 
feel that the rules are not everything they 
ought to be, it is a "lead-pipe-cinch" that 
they will get consideration from Cliff. 

When the National Basketball Committee 



meets in Louisville this month Cliff will be 
armed with the following suggestions which 
have come from officials. From Henderson 
came the suggestion that a part of Rule 4-8 
stating that a free throw ends when the ball 
touches the floor does not always mean this. 
Technically, when a foul shooter bounces the 
ball against the floor prior to his try, the 
free throw would end and his opponents 
would get the ball out of bounds because of 
the failure of the thrown ball to touch the 
basket. We know that this is not intended. 

From the mountains comes the suggestion 
that if a rule cannot be enforced it should be 
taken out of the book. Rule 10-6 says that it 
is a technical foul for a coach to signal or 
communicate with players except during an 
intermission or a charged time out. It is im- 
possible for officials to enforce this consist- 
ently and uniformly. Maybe coaching from 
the sideline should be legalized. It is legal In 
baseball. From the Bluegrass came the sug- 
gestion that Rule 1-7 stating that when new 
equipment is being installed for high school 
gymnasiums the fan-shaped backboard shall 
be used. Again we have a rule which is im- 
possible to enforce. This rule has been in 
the book for almost a decade during which 
many new backboards have been put in high 
school gymnasiums with utter disregard for 
a rule which athletic directors recognized 
could not be enforced. The Dutchman knows 
of only three gymnasiums in Kentucky with 
fan-shaped boards. 

From the Dutchman himself comes the 
criticism of the "Legal forceout." Here neg- 
ligible contact by Bl causing Al to step out 
of bounds causes the ball to be awarded to 
Team A. This should either be a foul by the 
Bl for forcing Al out because of contact or 
else Bl skillfully maneuvered his Al into an 
unfavorable position causing him to step out 
of bounds. In this case the Team B should be 
compensated with an out of bounds award. 

Now consider negligible contact by a Bl 
against his opponent at the dividing line: 
Al holds the ball near the division line in 
his front court. Bl attempts to secure the 
ball and his slight contact causes Al to step 
into the back court. Here negligible contact 
is ruled a personal foul or a violation, incon- 
sistent with the ruling on negligible contact 
on the "force out." 

All of us have the democratic privilege of 

disagreeing with the rules. Maybe we are 

right and maybe we are wrong! In either 

case we may democratically express our- 

(Continued on Page Eight) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1959 



Page Seven 



Football Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship of K. H. S. 
Member Schools — 1958 



A. A. 



Anderson 

Ashland 

Athercon 

Attacks 

Austin Tracy, 
Barbourville-,. 

Bardstown 

Bate 

Beechwood 

Beitry 

Bell County-, 

Bellevue 

Benham 



Black Star 

Boone County 

Bovviing Green 

Burgin 

Butier 

Caldwell County 

Campbell County 

Campbellsville 

Camp Dick Robinson. 

Carlisle 

Catlettsburg 



Central (Louisville) 

Corbin 

Crittenden County 

Cumberland 

Cynthiana 

Danville 

Daviess County 

Dayton 

DeSales 

Dixie Heights 

Douglass (Henderson) 

Douglass (Murray) 

DuBois 

duPont Manual 

Durrett 

East Benham 

Eastern 

East Main Street (Lynch) 

Elizabethtown 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 

Evarts 

Fern Creek 

Flaget 

Fleming-Neon 

Fort Knox 

Frankfort 

Franklin County 

Franklin-Simpson 

Fulton 

Georgetown 

Glasgow 

Hall 

Harlan 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 

Hazel Green 

Henderson 

Henderson County 

Henry Clay 

Highlands 

High Street (Bowling Green)__. 

Hiseville 

Holmes 

Hopkinsville 

Irvine 

Jenkins 

Jessamine County 

Ky. Mili. Inst 

Knox Central 

Lafayette 

Lancaster 

Lebanon 

Leslie County 

Lily 

Lincoln (Franklin) 

Lincoln (Middlesboro) 

Lincoln (Paducah) 

Lincoln (Stanford) 

Lincoln Inst. (Lincoln Ridge), 

Lloyd 

London 

Louisa 



OTHER 

SCHOOL 

OFFICIALS 



G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


3 




18 


3 




3 






28 


4 




11 


1 




35 


IX 




■i 






7 


2 


3 


4 


1 


1 


IX 


2 


1 


6 


1 




16 


7 


1 


10 






26 


3 




11 








10 




a 


1 




22 


3 




4 


2 




24 


3 




3 






35 


2 


1 


6 


1 




24 


5 


1 




1 




27 


2 




2 


1 




12 


1 




3 


1 




25 


2 


3 


7 


2 




«7 


6 


3 


8 


2 


1 


22 


8 


2 


2 






6 


2 




13 


2 




22 


13 


1 


9 


3 




22 


10 


3 


10 


1 




2fi 


12 


2 


5 
1 






20 
10 


3 

1 




3 


2 




19 


2 


2 


8 


5 




15 


10 


4 


2 


1 




9 


5 




19 






13 


19 


1 


6 


3 




37 


6 


1 


6 


6 


9 


11 
20 


8 


6 


8 






22 


7 


1 I 


7 






28 


6 




8 






27 


9 




13 
3 






26 
29 


10 

5 




6 






7 


5 


2 


8 


2 




4 


8 


4 


14 
1 






4 
40 


9 
2 


2 


7 






33 


7 




1 


3 




6 


2 


2 


6 






42 


5 


3 


1 




2 


30 


2 


1 


5 


1 




28 


5 


1 


6 






29 


3 




2 
3 


1 




6 
16 


6 
1 




7 






35 


8 




10 


1 




30 


n 




2 


1 


1 


26 


4 




7 


2 




19 


12 




2 






16 


7 




6 






15 


5 




4 






31 


4 




2 






21 






12 


1 




19 


12 




8 


2 




19 


12 








3 


27 


3 






1 




19 


4 


2 


6 






24 


5 




2 






25 


3 


1 


3 






8 


3 




9 


2 




29 


10 


2 


12 


1 




20 


18 


2 


11 


2 




11 


13 


2 


8 


2 




25 


15 




4 


2 




16 


8 




5 


2 




12 


6 




8 


4 




25 


6 


4 1 


7 
1 


4 


2 


21 
23 


8 

1 


3 1 

1 


2 


1 




2fi 




1 


7 

1 






20 
25 


6 
5 




2 


2 




18 


3 


2 


8 






27 


S 




2 


3 




20 


3 




11 


1 




22 


8 


1 


1 


1 




26 


2 


2 1 


3 
1 


1 




9 
10 


3 
3 




1 


3 




4 


4 


2 


4 






8 


3 




7 






1 


6 




6 


1 




2 


B 




5 






26 


4 


2 


4 






27 


11 




13 


2 




6 


11 


6 



Fage Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1959 



Louisville Country Day 

Loyall 

Ludlow 

Lynn Camp 

McKeii 

^viadi son -Model 

Madisonvilie 

Male 

Mayfield 

Middlesboro 

Millersburg Mili. inst 

Morganfield 

Ml. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Murray 

Napier 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Oidham County 

Old Ky. Home 

Owens boro 

Owensboro Catholic 

Faducah Tilghman 

Paint Lick 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park City 

P. L. Dunbar 

Perryville 

Pikeville 

Pineville 

Prestonsburg 

Providence 

Raceland 

Rosenwald (Harlan) 

Rosenwald (Lebanon ) 

Russell 

Russellville 

St. Charles 

St. Joseph Prep. 

St. Xavier 

Seneca 

Shawnee 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Somerset 

Southern 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Sturgis 

Temple Hill 

Tompkinsville 

Trigg County 

Trinity 

Valley 

Versailles 

Waggener 

Wallins 

Western (Owensboro) 

Western (Paris) 

West Main Street (Lynch). 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Williamsburg 

Winchester 

Wurtland 



1 


OTHEK 












COACH 1 


SCHOOL 




CROWD 




TEAM 


j 


OFFICIALS 












G F P 1 E 


G F P 


E 


G F P 


E 


G 


F 


1 4 1 


1 22 


5 1 


1 


22 


5 






21 


6 




1 1 1 




21) 




1 




20 




1 




20 


1 




1 3 1 


1 


27 


3 






27 


3 






25 


4 


1 


1 2 






25 








23 


2 






19 


5 


1 


1 « 






2« 


4 






23 


6 


1 




21 


9 




1 3 


1 


2 


30 


ft 


1 




29 


5 


2 




31 


5 


1 


I 7 


1 


2 


38 


2 






30 


6 


3 




32 


7 


1 


1 11 




1 


31 


10 


1 




29 


12 


1 




31 


11 




1 5 






38 


4 






37 


5 






35 


7 




1 2 






2ft 


1 






25 


1 






23 


3 




1 7 






IK 


7 






16 


7 






14 


7 


1 1 


; B 






37 


« 






37 


4 


1 




35 


7 


1 


13 

1 


G 


6 


32 

14 


6 




1 


"7 


12 

7 


1 




22 

8 


13 
6 


4 


2 






33 


2 






33 


2 






33 


2 




2 




1 


32 


1 




1 


31 


3 






29 


2 


3 


6 


1 


1 


30 


5 


1 




28 


7 


1 




29 


5 


2 


2 






23 


2 






20 


2 


1 




21 


2 


1 


7 






24 


6 






22 


7 






24 


6 




7 


4 


1 


24 


6 


2 




23 


9 






25 


6 


1 


2 






32 


3 






30 


5 






31 


4 




10 

1 3 


1 




23 
37 


9 
3 






25 
36 


4 
4 


3 




16 
36 


9 
4 


5 

1 


3 






9 


1 






7 


1 


2 




7 


3 


1 


5 


2 




35 


3 






28 


9 


1 




31 


7 




7 






25 
13 


7 






22 
10 


8 
3 


1 




20 

12 


9 
1 


1 


14 


4 




9 


19 


1 




4 


23 






7 


16 


3 1 


1 2 






11 








9 


2 






10 


1 




6 


2 


2 


24 


4 




2 


18 


9 


2 




17 


6 


4 


3 


1 




30 


1 


1 




26 


3 


1 




25 


4 


2 


5 






32 


3 






25 


9 


1 




24 


1(1 


1 


11 


2 




24 


10 


1 


1 


20 


13 


1 




18 


17 


1 


5 

1 


1 
1 




25 

14 


2 

1 


1 




15 
14 


12 

1 


1 




17 

12 


9 
2 


2 

1 1 


3 






7 


5 






7 


5 






7 


4 


1 


6 


2 




14 


7 






10 


10 


1 




11 


9 


1 1 


7 


1 


1 


28 


5 


2 




25 


8 






26 


7 


1 1 


2 






25 


2 






20 


6 


1 




18 


7 


2 1 


8 






30 


8 






27 


11 






26 


12 


1 


e 


1 


1 


39 


7 






37 


9 






37 


9 




3 






11 


3 






11 


3 






8 


6 




4 






36 


5 






33 


8 






36 


6 


1 


2 


1 


1 


31 


2 






30 


3 






31 


2 




4 


1 


2 


15 


1 


1 


2 


14 


3 


1 




13 


5 




7 






38 




1 




30 


8 






28 


12 




6 


1 




38 


4 






38 


4 






38 


3 


1 


5 






16 


6 






14 


7 


1 




14 


8 




4 
1 

1 


3 

1 


1 


22 

38 
14 


2 
2 


1 




16 
36 
11 


5 
4 
3 


1 




14 
35 
12 


7 
5 
2 


2 


12 


1 




17 


8 






8 


9 


6 




12 


11 


2 


10 






31 


8 






30 


H 






28 


11 




4 






33 


4 






35 


7 






28 


9 




6 






38 


5 






38 


ft 






38 


3 


2 1 


2 






28 


3 






22 


8 






22 


X 


1 1 


6 


1 


2 


34 


4 


1 




33 


5 


1 




32 


6 


1 1 


3 






27 


1 






27 


1 






27 


1 




3 






16 


9 






16 


9 






21 


4 




11 






2 


13 








15 






4 


9 


1 


7 


1 


2 


13 


8 






14 


5 


1 




14 


7 




5 






23 


2 






20 


4 


1 




18 


4 


3 


3 




1 


26 
23 


1 






25 
21 


2 

1 


1 




23 
23 


3 


1 


9 
3 






29 
10 


4 
3 






26 

8 


7 
4 




1 


23 

8 


8 
5 


2 



THE FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Pag-e Six) 
selves to our rules representatives. Once 
the rules are written we are law-abiding of- 
ficials and must enforce them. Nobody can 
please everybody. 

Congratulations to "Johnie Crowdus, The 
Sage of Franklin!" "Johnie" was honored 
this month by being the recipient of the 
Degree of Doctor of Recreation Arts along 
with the Bachelor's Degree in Fishing from 
the Jefferson County Recreation Board. 
"Johnie" is one of Kentucky's outstanding 
men in the field of recreation beside being 
a golfer par excellence. 

With State Tournament time approaching 



the Dutchman reminds Kentuckians that the 
deadline for nominating young athletes for 
the Game Guy Award is the night of the 
finals on March 21. Kentucky's Game Guys, 
its sportsman-like competition plus em- 
phasis on character-building add up to out- 
standing school boy sports program. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List compiled March 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
tlie home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Dial. Jack, 1230 26th Street, Huntington, W. Va. 

Hall. C. E.. Jr.. Raceland 

Prichard. Glenn W., Kermit. W. Va. 

Schellhase. David, 1614 Keck. Evansville. Ind. 

Whitham, M/Set. Challenger, 3028-C. Ft. Campbell, 4538. 3320 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1959 



Page Nine 



Team Scoring — 1959 Kentucky State High School Swimming Meet — Class A 



EVENT 


TEAM 
Atherton Waggener Lafayette St. X. Manual Eastern Holmes 


400 Yard Freestyle 


7 5 10 


50 Yard Freestyle 

100 Yard Butterfly 


12 4 2 4 
4 5 2 10 1 


200 Yard Freestyle 


11 5 5 1 


100 Yard Backstroke 


9 4 5 3 


lOO Yard Freestyle 


11 7 1 3 


100 Yard Breaststroke 


9 4 9 
9 8 4 10 


150 Yard Individual Medley 

2C0 Yard Medley Relay 


8 9 1 4 
14 10 6 8 4 


200 Yard Freestyle Relay 


6 14 10 8 2 4 


Total Points 


100 68 48 48 8 7 4 







WHAT IS AMERICA? 

( Continued from Page Five) 
American home, from Shaker Heights on the 
east to Rocky River on the west, from the 
central area to Parma, across, up, down and 
deep into the very heart of this tremendous, 
vital, sweeping cosmopolitan community — 
this community of diversified industry, 
diversified interests, of understanding, and 
working together in so many common causes ? 
Of men and women giving so freely of them- 
selves for so many worth-while things ? 

Where else on earth, in any other country 
anywhere, and, for that matter, at any other 
time, would there be gathered together, 
laughing, gaily talking with one another, 
completely relaxed, and with an utter ab- 
sence of a dictator's lash or tension, so many 
boys and girls of so widely diverse origins 
and beliefs and colors? 

Gathered not by anybody's order — not be- 
cause some ruler wishes to "stage" a crowd 
for some obscure purpose — but only because 
on a July afternoon, in a high school stadium, 
these boys and girls came freely, naturally, 
spontaneously together for competition be- 
cause they felt it was a normal part of 
their community lives. 

Eddie Finegan, who helped so much to 
spur Harrison Dillard to world-wide fame as 
a track star, stepped to the microphone. He 
said: "Junior Olympians, march!" 
. The band struck up a quick tempo. For- 



ward marched the hundreds of boys and 
girls from all of Greater Cleveland's widely 
different localities and homes — marching to- 
gether, oblivious altogether to their differ- 
ences and thinking only of their similarities 
— young American citizens, all. 

The band stopped. The marching ceased. 
Tug Wilson, the famous arbiter of American 
athletics, raised his hand and requested that 
the famous Olympic oath be repeated after 
him. 

In unison these hundreds of Greater Cleve- 
land boys and girls spoke out concluding 
with the words — "We shall be generous in 
victory, and gracious in defeat." 

A whistle blew. The hundreds of boys and 
girls took their places. The Junior Olympics 
finals were on. 

It was exciting. It was something more 
than that! 

It was deeply significant and impressive 
and helped an editor, only a short time before 
requested to answer in an upside-down 
world — a world beset with an unending series 
of crises — a world threatened by extinction 
with nuclear weapons in the hands of power- 
hungry dictators — a world that seemed more 
than ever to need answers to questions — 
the question "What is America?" 

The answer was there yesterday after- 
noon on the track field at West Tech High 
School — there for all to see, there in the pres- 



Pag-e Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1959 



ence of hundreds of boys and girls who rep- 
resented more kinds of geople gathered from 
more places on earth with more differing 
points of view than any other place on this 
earth. 

And there they were, brought together, 
voluntarily, and because sensitive men and 
women cared for them and for the country 
they love — there they were together, on the 
same field, for the same purpose, in a free 
country, learning to play together, compete 
against one another under good sponsorship 
and fair rules — and learning the biggest les- 
son that any of us in this vast, free, dynamic 
country can ever learn, the lesson of "What is 
America?"— L.B.S. 

— The Cleveland Press. 



HOW ABOUT FOOTBALL? 

(Continued from Page One) 

assets, more so than any other activity in 
our present-day school systems. 

"Any idea that a little longer football sea- 
son will hamper basketball does not neces- 
sarily prove true in Kentucky or other states, 
or even in certain sections of the state. All 
that would be needed to equalize the situa- 
tion would be a simple changing of dates. 
Start the basketball season about two weeks 
later and let it end the last of March instead 
of the middle of the month. Outside weather 
the last two weeks of March is very seldom 
suitable for baseball or even spring football 
practice, or track or tennis. Spring football 
could be eliminated in the high school with- 
out any serious loss by starting practice 
earlier in August and developing track and 
baseball as good sports in the spring." 

Mr. Flora thinks that tennis and baseball 
schedules might be carried on through the 
early summer months to build a stronger 
over-all sports program. This would keep 
many male faculty members employed dur- 
ing the full year and would "enable them to 
help keep our boys off the streets, out of 
trouble, and in clean, body building, charac- 
ter building activities." Some school budgets 
might not find it possible to allow this ex- 
tended program, but Mr. Flora's suggestion 
is a worthy goal. He concludes: "It's time we 
in Kentucky stop thinking about economy 
in school systems, and start developing a 
much fuller program to provide for the 
'Space Age' living." 



Here and There 

H. V. Porter, National Federation Secre- 
tary-Emeritus, was guest of the Hawaiian 
High School Athletic Association during the 
third week in October. While in the Ha- 
waiian Islands, Mr. Porter made presenta- 
tions to the Hawaiian High School Athletic 
Association's annual meeting and a confer- 
ence of Public School Principals. His topics 
were: "Interscholastic Athletics — A Chal- 
lenge to School Administrators" and "The 
National Federation of State High School 
Athletic Associations." Both presentations 
were enthusiastically received. At a luncheon 
meeting he, on behalf of the H.H.S.A.A., 
awarded keys to retiring Executive Board 
Members. His opening addresses emphasized 
the administrator's responsibility and the 
tremendous potential inherent in a well- 
administered athletic program. His second 
presentation explained the philosophy of the 
National Federation and related its history, 
reviewing many of the projects conducted 
within the organization. 

Mr. C. N. (Cal) Sparrow has recently been 
named Vice-President in Charge of Sales by 
John T. Riddell, Inc., of Chicago, manufac- 
turers of athletic shoes and safety suspen- 
sion helmets. Mr. Harry A. Henderson was 
promoted to Sales Manager. Both men have 
had extensive experience with football shoes 
and head protectors. Mr. Sparrow joined the 
Riddell Company in 1950, after more than 
twenty-five years' experience in the footwear 
industry. As Assistant Sales Manager, and 
then Sales Manager, Cal has traveled 
throughout the country working with and 
helping coaches in properly fitting players 
and caring for protective equipment. He 
supervised and conducted field testing pro- 
jects in conjunction with the Riddell Re- 
search Department. 

Information concerning the large number 
participating in interscholastic athletic activ- 
ities sponsored by State Associations con- 
tinues to be a source of satisfaction to those 
administering the program. Iowa, Ohio, 
Michigan and Wisconsin, among others, are 
several states which have, on previous oc- 
casions, released information concerning the 
large percentage of male students participat- 
ing on one or more interscholastic squads 
during the school year. Just recently, Idaho's 
Annual Report revealed approximately 15% 
of all the students in member schools (30% 
of the boys) participated in 11- and 8-man 
interscholastic football during the 1957-58 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1959 



Page Eleven 



school year. 22% of the boys played basket- 
ball interscholastically and the four-sport 
spring season provided opportunity for 27% 
of the male high school population to com- 
pete. Few, if any, activities in the second- 
ary school program interest such a large 
segment of the enrollment. To many, this is 
gratifying evidence that interscholastics are 
not for the few but, to the contrary, are for 
many. 

A plaque honoring the late P. F. Never- 
man for his services to the Wisconsin Inter- 
scholastic Athletic Association as first Ex- 
ecutive Secretary will be presented to Mrs. 
Neverman during the Association's annual 
meeting. Mr. Neverman served the W.I.A.A. 
for more than a quarter of a century. He 
died this past summer at his home in Marin- 
ette, Wisconsin. 

The number of schools within National 
Federation member states and affiliates 
playing football has more than doubled since 
1941, a period of 16 years. Football was spon- 
sored in 1941 by 6,121 schools. In 1957, there 
were 12,412 schools providing the activity. 
16 years ago, approximately 312,000 boys 
participated on an interscholastic basis and 
last year over 656,000 played. The greatest 
period of growth was during the years 1944, 
1945, 1946 and 1947, when approximately 
1,000 schools added interscholastic football 
to their program annually. Many schools, of 
course, sponsor three or four interscholastic 
squads, each of which plays a full schedule 
of games. 

Saturday, November 8 was Harold W. Ems- 
wiler Day in Columbus, Ohio, as proclaimed 
by the city's Mayor. It was a day for an earn- 
ed and richly deserved "Emmy for Emy" ; 
an occasion at which the retiring veteran 
Commissioner of the Ohio High School Ath- 
letic Association and his charming wife were 
honored by their many, many friends and co- 
workers. In recognition of 55 years of public 
service, the Emswilers were guests at an 
All-District Board dinner where they re- 
ceived a television set, a movie camera and 
projector and jewelry as gifts. Following the 
dinner, the group adjourned to the Columbus 
Central High School where Emy had served 
as Principal for several years prior to his 
appointment as Commissioner in 1944. There, 
several hundred of his friends from through- 
out Ohio paid him tribute. Ohio State As- 
sociation Officers, the Mayor of Columbus 
and Ohio State's Dick Larkin and Woody 
Hayes were among those who participated 
in the informal program. Messages from the 



Governor, several State Executive Officers, 
the National Federation, Fritz Crisler and 
Paul Brown among others, were read. To 
climax the evening, Mr. and Mrs. Emswiler 
were presented with the keys to a new Pon- 
tiac Station Wagon, a gift from their hun- 
dreds of friends and admirers. 

Two suggestions to enable the traveling 
basketball team to reach home at an earlier 
hour than is customary has been made by 
the Tennessee Secondary School Association 
News. It is proposed the schedules be ar- 
ranged so distant schools are played on 
Friday or Saturday evenines and nearby 
schools be played on nights which are follow- 
ed by a school day. The second recommen- 
dation suggests all games played during the 
week start at 7:00 o'clock, or earlier. The 
News contends, "A little advance planning by 
principals and coaches along this line can 
be made to pay big dividends" and "The 30 
minutes saved enables the players to arrive 
home at an earlier hour and it does not great- 
ly inconvenience those that attend the games 
as spectators. 

A new baseball picture to be filmed under 
the sponsorshiD of the Official Sports Film 
Service at Al Lopez Field, Tamna. Florida is 
now being planned. The schedule calls for 
the film being made durin? the week of 
April 6, 1959. 20 nla.vers will be selected from 
the four Tamna a^ea high schools to demon- 
strate the rules situations. The players will 
be supervised by the four hisrh school base- 
ball coaches and a technical staff represent- 
ing the National Federation. A new format 
is anticipated to introduce the rule interpre- 
tations. 

Football data, as collected for use by the 
National Football Committee at their recent 
meeting revealed some significant facts. On 
the annual questionnaire, there was an al- 
most unanimous vote in favor of retaining 
the current rule which provides that one 
point shall be scored for any tvoe of success- 
iful try-for-noint. The feeling in this connec- 
tion may be influenced by a related fact re- 
vealed by the data sheets. On the high school 
level, skill in kicking is somewhat less than 
in Professional ranks. Of the try-for-point 
attempts by kick, only about 40% are suc- 
cessful. In contrast, attempts by rushing are 
60% successful and attempts by passing are 
50% successful. It was pointed out at the 
meeting that if greater value should be given 
to any type of try-for-point, it should prob- 
ably be given for the more difficult attempt 
by kicking. Those interested in 6-Man Foot- 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1959 



ball have recognized this for a number of 
years and a higher value is placed on a try- 
for-point by kicking. If the high schools were 
to make the run or pass twice as valuable as 
a kick, it would tend to eliminate all kicks, 
thus leaving football as a misnamed sport 
since there would, then, be almost no incen- 
tive for teaching the skills which are con- 
nected with use of the foot. 

The 1959 Basketball Questionnaire is being 
widely distributed. This has become a useful 
device for maintaining interest among 
coaches, officials and administrators and for 
permitting great numbers to participate in 
matters pertaining to the rules and further 
perfection of the game. The questionnaire 
provides opportunity to exoress opinion as 
to rules which are beinpr u?ed for the first 
time this year and to indicate desii'e-. as far 
as proposals for rules revision are concerned. 
The topics included on the questionnaire in- 
dicate that there is continued interest in 
attempts to further decrease the number of 
free throws without reducing the incentive 
for avoiding contact. The greatest current 
problem continues to be the last few minutes 
of the game when there seems to leave the 
team behind no alternative but to intention- 
ally commit a foul while nretending no such 
intention. No official calls such act an in- 
tentional foul because most coaches and spec- 
tators sympathize with the predicament of 
the team which is behind. A "pat on the 
back" and a trip to here, there and yonder 
awaits the individual who is smai-t enough 
to find a cure for this difficulty in the game. 

Safety Factors continue to command the 
attention of all of those connected with the 
contact sports. In baseball, use of protective 
headgear is now mandatorv pnd the new rule 
recommends that the protection extend to 
the temples as well as to the top of the head. 
In football, the practice of using some type 
of face protector has come to be nearly uni- 
versal. Efforts are now being made to sub- 
stitute more adequate protection for the 
single-bar face mask which has been widelv 
used because of its lightness and because of 
its minimum obstruction of view. The recent- 
ly issued football minute; folder lists the fol- 
lowing code provisions which are sip'nificant 
safety devices: freedom to freelv substitute 



without the necessity of entry and with- 
drawal records ; allowing one player to confer 
with his coach at certain times ; requiring a 
one-down withdrawal of any injured player 
when the injury requires a time-out; avoid- 
ance of injury hazards by having ball become 
dead when kick touches in R's end zone; and 
clear-cut rules prohibiting dangerous use of 
elbows or hard pads on the arm or wrist. 

The Colorado High School Activities As- 
sociation anticipates construction of its new 
headquarters building early in the Spring. 
The building is designed to especially im- 
prove the efficiency and convenience of the 
many committee and Board meetings and 
conferences which member school officials 
must attend in order to properly meet the 
responsibilities of the interscholastic activity 
program. The proposed building will make 
it possible for the headquarters staff to 
improve and extend the services desired and 
needed by the Colorado public high schools. 
As planned, it will provide ample office space 
for the present staff, along with an assembly 
room which will be approximately 53 by 35 
feet. A basement will provide storage space 
for records and stock, plus two rooms for 
committee meetings. The estimated cost will 
be $89,500, with approximately $37,000 com- 
ing from the State Association's operating 
budget and general reserve fund, $30,000 
to be borrowed and about $22,500 from mem- 
ber schools. It was suggested that contribu- 
tions from the member schools be made on a 
basis of twice the annual service fee of each 
school, the total to be paid in the ensuing two 
years. Since there are approximately 65,000 
students in the Colorado High School Activ- 
ities Association member schools, each school 
would have the responsibility of providing 
about 35(* for each student served by the pro- 
gram. The committee is of the opinion the 
potential benefits are so great and the cost 
to the member schools on a per student basis 
so low that the project will be carried to a 
successful conclusion at a very early date. 
A unique feature of the building will be a 
memorial room which will provide a place 
to honor those who have given much personal 
time and effort to the State Association and 
those who have made outstanding contribu- 
tions to its development and growth. 



HUNT'S AWARD JACKETS FOR 1959 

We offer the finest award jackets available anywhere, at the most attrac- 
tive prices. 

Hunt's Award Jackets are designed for campus and street wear — not for 
pre-game warm-up. Sized to finish 6 to 8 inches oversize. Average sleeve 
length 34". Average body length 25". Sizes: 32 to 46 inclusive. 

STYLE 1935 - SELF MATERIAL SET-IN SLEEVES 
Solid color jacket. Slash pockets. Leather facings. Snap fastener front. Mixed wool 
knit trim. 

19.35R 2t oz. 100% Reijroces.sed Wool, Colors: Royal, Navy, Black, Maroon $10.95 

19.35W 24 nz. flannel. lOC/r Virgin Wool, all colors $11.95 

STYLE 1931 - LEATHER ARMHOLE INSERT 

Set-in sleeves with contrasting color leather armhole insert and pocket facings. 
Set-in slash pockets, snap front. Mixed wool knit trim. 

1931R 24 oz. Reprocessed, 100% Wool. Colors: Navy, Maroon, Black and Royal__$11.25 
1931W 24 oz. Flannel, 100% Virgin Wool. All colors $12.25 

STYLE 1936 - SELF MATERIAL RAGLAN SLEEVES 

Solid color raglan sleeve jacket. Set-in slash pockets with leather facings. Snap 
fastener front. Mixed wool knit trim. 

1946R 24 oz. Reprocessed, 1007r Wool. Colors: Navy, Maroon, Black and Royal__$11.50 
1936W 24 oz. flannel, 100% Virgin Wool. All Colors $12.50 

STYLE 1911 - LEATHER SET-IN SLEEVE 

Leather sleeve award jackets. Mixed wool knit trim. Select top grain leather sleeves in 
colors: cream, oak, palomino, black, grey, white, royal, scarlet, gold, maroon, burnt 
orange, kelly, and Ijrown. Set-in pockets with contrasting color leather facings. Easy 
action smap fasteners in athletic colors furnished regularly. 

1911W 24 oz. flannel, 100% Virgin Wool. All Colors $15.95 

1912W 24 oz. flannel, 100% Virgin Wool. All Colors. Same as above, 

only raglan sleeve model $16.95 

Leather sleeve jackets as listed above are not available in Grade R, Reprocessed Wool. 

STYLE 1939 - RAGLAN SLEEVES - REVERSIBLE 

Raglan sleeve, solid color reversible jacket. Cut extra full throughout. Two set-in slash 
pockets. Leather pocket facings. Mixed wool knit trim. Reversed to solid color linings 
with set-in pockets. 
1939RT 24 oz. Reprocessed 100% Wool. Colors: Black, Navy, Maroon, Royal, 

reversed to Skinners tackle twill in any color $15.95 

1939WT 24. oz. 100% Virgin Wool any color reversed to Skinners tackle twill. 

.\ny color $16.95 

STYLE 1939 - RAGLAN SLEEVES - REVERSIBLE 

1939RP 24 oz. Reprocessed 100% Wool. Colors: Black, Navy, Maroon and Royal 

reversed to tan or grey poplin $13.95 

1939WP 24 oz. 100% Virgin Wool. Any color reversed to tan or grey poplin $14.95 

JACKET EXTRAS 

Full body lining of white or rainbow iridescent satin $1.00 

Full zipper front .75 

White body and white sleeves $2.30 

We are able to supply for these jackets at reasonable prices, the finest 
quality chenille award letters with inserts, emblems, nameplates, bars, 
chevrons, etc. 

Prompt deliverv can be made on all of the above jackets. Get in touch with 
us, and our salesman will call with samples. 

HUNT^S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

INCORPORATED 

PHONE 103 OR 104 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



We Ship Thp DaV Vou BuV 



Sutcliffe always has thent'^on time! 

BASEBALL UNIFORMS 

IN STOCK FOR 

IMMEDIATE 
DELIVERY 

2 PIECE SUITS - SHIRTS & PANTS 
^900 _ $|||50 _ $1300 , |i|^^95 

Swatches of Fabric in Each Price 
Range Sent Promptly Upon Request 

We have in stock several grades in 
Caps, Belts and Stockings. These are 
shown in our NEW 1959 Athletic Cat- 
alog which you should have. 




K> E. A. When in Louisville be sure to visit Sutcliffe's Display quarters 
at Room 812, Kentucky Hotel, April 15-16-17. See, inspect and order 
your athletic goods equipment for Summer, for next Fall and next year. 

^ ^ ^ STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT ^ ^ ^ 

Lexington March 18 - 19 - 20 - 21 

See SUTCLIFFE REPRESENTATIVES 

Rooms 461 - 462 PHOENIX HOTEL 



Reach American League Baseballs, each $2.35 Spalding National League Baseballs, each $2.35 

Wilson American Ass'n Baseballs, each $2.35 Sutcliffe Official League Baseballs, each $1.75 

LOUISVILLE SLUGGER BATS 

No. 125 - Natural White Ash, each $3.45 No. 150 - White Ash, each $2.70 

Plenty of lower price Bats also in Stock for At Once Delivery 

Write to Sutcliffe for complete illustrated, descriptive Catalog ard listing 
of school prices on baseball, soft ball, track, tennis and golf. 



UTCLIFFE CO 




o R 



LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 





Hiqh khool AHikfe 



NORTH MARSHALL HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL TEAM 
K. H. S. A. A. CHAMPION— 1959 





(Left to Right) Front Row: Jerry Powell, Jimmy Lampley, Sam Clark, Kendall 
King, Gary Seay, Mitchell Watkins. Back Row: Coaoh Charlie Lampley, Benny 
Goheen, Dolph Larimer, Pat Doyle, Harold Ellington, Roscoe Spiceland, Joel Wom- 
mack, Assistant Coach Buddy Poe. 

Regional Tournament Games Won 

Nort'h Marshall 49-45 Benton 

North Marshall 38-30- _Paducah Tilgrhman 

North Marshall 61-41 Fancy Fann 



District Tournament Games Won 

Noi-th Marshall 80-59 New Concord 

North Marshall 67-48 South Marshall 

North Marshall 66-57 Beinton 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

APRIL - 1953 




Manual— Runner-Up 
1959 State Basketball Tournament 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Donald Bauer, Paul McPherson, Donnie Brown, Tlommie Milton, 
Leland Melear, Harold Flint, Robert Rice, Sherman Lewis, Manager John Trumbull. Back Row: 
Ass't Coach Neal Skeeters, Joe Smith, Ronnie Siers, Ronnie Loy, Gerald Glur, Ronnie Monks, 
James Ricketts, Mike Pfister, Coach James Casillo. 

Lexington Dunbar— Third Place Winner 
1959 State Basketball Tournament 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Ed McDowell, Felix Scruggs, William Smothers. Julius Berry, 
James Young. Back Row: Ass't Coach N. L. Passmore, Mgr. Frank Roberts, Ulysses Berry, Don 
Cunningham, Herbert Washington, Richard Williams, Henry Jones, John Thomas, Preston Logan, 
Mgr. James Marks, Coach S. H. Roach. 



7726 Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XXI— No. 9 



APRIL, 1959 



.00 Per Year 



1959 Annual Meeting 

The business meeting of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association will be held on 
Thursday, April 16, at 2 :30 P. M. The place 
will be the South Room at the Brown Hotel, 
Louisville. The dinner meeting will be held 
in the Crystal Ballroom of the Brown Hotel, 
the hour being 6 :00 P. M. 

The principal speaker at the dinner meet- 
ing will be Dr. Philip Davidson, President of 
the University of Louisville. The presenta- 
tion of the Game Guy Award will be made 
during the meeting, and the program will 
also include entertainment features. 

As provided in Article IX, Section 1, of 
the K.H.S.A.A. Constitution, the following 
changes in the Constitution, By-Laws, and 
Tournament Rules, to be acted upon by the 
Delegate Assembly, are hereby submitted to 
all members of the K.H.S.A.A. for their con- 
sideration. 

PROPOSAL I 

The Board of Control proposes that the 
last sentence of By-Law 20, Section 1, be 
amended to read as follows: "No member 
school shall take part in any tournament or 
game from which any outside organization 
derives a financial profit from ticket sales, 
advertising, concessions, or any other source. 
Violation of this provision shall cause the 
offending school to be suspended from mem- 
bership in this association for a minimum 
period of six months, or for a longer period, 
not to exceed one year as the Commissioner 
mav decree." 

PROPOSAL n 

The Board of Control proposes that By- 
Law 30 be changed to read as follows: "All 
coaches and assistant coaches of athletic 
teams of members of this association shall be 
ceritified teachers and members of their 
regular school faculties. They shall be reg- 
ularly employed by their Boards of Educa- 
tion, and their entire salaries shall be paid 
by such boards ; they shall teach a minimum 
of three regular periods of classes, gymnas- 
ium, study halls, or other activity assign- 
ments within the school's schedule. All 
(Continued on Page Eleven) 



BOARD MEMBERS RE-ELECTED 




Robert P. Forsythe 



Kenneth G. Gillaspie 



Superintendent Robert P. Forsythe of 
Greenville and Superintendent Kenneth G. 
Gillaspie of Georgetown will represent Sec- 
tions 2 and 5 respectively on the Board of 
Control for a four-year period, beginning 
July 1, 1959. Each Director is beginning his 
second four-year term of Board membership. 
Both men were unopposed for re-election. 

Mr. Forsythe was born on August 20, 1917, 
at Belton, Mulhenberg County, Kentucky. He 
attended rural schools in Muhlenberg County 
and graduated from the Hughes-Kirkpatrick 
High School, Beechmont, in 1935. He received 
his B.S. and M.A. degrees from Western Ken- 
tucky State College. After teaching in the 
rural schools of Muhlenberg County for three 
years, Mr. Forsythe taught and coached 
basketball for one year in Daviess County 
schools. He entered the Army in 1942 as a 
private, and was discharged in 1946 as a 
captain. He taught in the Central City system 
for six years, and was Superintendent of 
Muhlenberg County Schools for the period of 
1953-56. He has been Superintendent of 
Greenville Independent Schools since 1956. 

In 1942, Mr. Forsythe married Miss Clara 
M. Westerfield. He has two sons, Preston, 
age twelve, and Noel, age nine. He is a mem- 
ber of K.E.A., N.E.A., Kiwanis, American 
Legion, and Masonic Lodge. He is a deacon 
in the First Baptist Church of Greenville, 
and is Superintendent of the Adult Sunday 

(Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1959 



APRIIL, 1959 



VOL. XXI— NO. 9 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington. Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60). Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Directors— W. B. Jones, (1957-61) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
(1S58-62) Franklin; Jack Dawson (1958-62), Louisville; Robert 
P. Forsythe (1955-59). Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie (1956-59), 
Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1966-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



':rom 



file Ci 



ommissionei 



's Offi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1958-59 Basketball Participation List 

(Elig-ibility) 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 

ball) 



REGIONAL TRACK MEETS 

The Board of Control has established twelve 
track regions for 1959. The scheduled date for the 
reg-ional meets is May 15 or 16. Only first and second 
place wiruners in the regions will qualify for the 
State Meet. Sites of the meets are: Murray, Hen- 
derson, Bowling Green, Port Knox, Danville, Louis- 
ville (Bellarmine College), Louisville (Shawnee), 
Bellevue, Lexington, Barbourville, Elkhorn City, and 
Ashland. 

The assignment of schools by regions is as 
follows: 

Murray Region — Ballai'd Memorial, Caldwell 
County, Cuba, Fulton, Hopkinsville, Lacy, Mayfield, 
Murray, Murray Training, Paducah Tilghman, 
Sinking Fork, South Christian, Todd County, Trigg 
County. 

Henderson Region — Attucks, Calhoun, Crofton, 
Daviess County, Douglass, Henderson, Henderson 
County, Holy Name, Madisonville, Morganfield, 
Owensboro, Providence, Sturgis. 

Bowling Green Region — Austin Tracy, Bowling 
Green, Bunche, Butler County, College, Drakesboro 
Community, Franklin Simpson, Gamaliel, Glasgow, 
High Street, Hiseville, Lincoln, Muhlenberg, Park 
City, Russellville, Temple Hill, Tompkinsville, War- 
ren County. 

Fort Knox Region — Breckinridge County, Camp- 
bellsville, Caverna, Elizabethtown, Elizabethtown 
Catholic, Port Knox, Frederick Fraize, Glendale, 
Greensburg, Howevalley, Leitchfield, Meade County, 
Metcalfe County, "Vine Grove. 

Bellarmine Region — Butler, Durrett, Eastern, 
Fern Creek, Kentucky Military Institute, Kentucky 
School for the Bliin.d, Lincoln Institute, Oldham 
County, Seneca, Southern, Trimfble County, Trinity, 
Valley, Waggener. 

Louisville Region — Atherton, Central, DeSales, 
duPont Manual, Plaget, Male, St. Xavier, Shawnee. 



STATE TRACK MEET SCHEDULE 
Lexington, Kentucky, May 22-23 

(Time is Central Daylight Time) 
FRIDAY 

2:15 P. M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles (4 heats), 
3 from each heat qualify for Semi-finals; Shot Put 
and Pole Vault, Finals. 

2:35 P. M.— 100 Yard Dash (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

2:50 P. M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles (Semi-finals), 
3 from each heat qualify for Finals. 

3:05 P. M.— 880 Yard Relay (4 heats), 3 from 
each heat qualify for Semi-finals. 

3:35 P. M.— 440 Yard Dash (3 heats), 2 from 
each heat qualify for Finals. 

4:00 P. M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles (4 heats), 3 
from each heat qualify for Semi-finals. 

4:20 P. M.— 880 Yard Run (3 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

4:45 P. M.— 220 Yard Dash (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

5:05 P. M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles (Semi-finals), 
3 from each heat qualify for Finals. 

5:20 P. M.— 880 Yard Relay (Semi-finals), 3 from 
each heat qualify for Finals. 

5:35 P. M.— Mile Relay (3 heats), 2 from eaoh 
heat qualify for Finals. 

SATURDAY 

1:00 P. M. — High Jump and Discus 

2:00 P. M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles 

2:15 P. M.— 100 Yard Dash 

2:30 P. M. — ^Mile Run and Broad Jump 

2:45 P. M.— 880 Yard Relay 

3:00 P. M. — 440 Yard Dash 

3:15 P. M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles 

3:30 P. M.— 880 Yard Run 

3:45 P. M.— 220 Yard Dash 

4:00 P. M.— Mile Relay 



Lexington Region — Berea Foundation, Bourbon 
County, Bryan Station, Camargo, Carlisle, DuBois, 
Dumbar, Frankfort, Franklin County, Harrodsburg, 
Henry Clay, Lafayette, Madison Central, Millersbui-g 
Military Institute, Montgomery County, Mt. Sterling 
Paris, Scott County, Simmons, University. 

Bellevue Region — Beeohwood, Bellevue, Boone 
County, Campbell County, Dayton, Dixie Heights, 
Grant County, Highlands, Holmes, Lloyd, Newport, 
Simon Kenton. 

Danville Region — Bardstown, Camp Dick Rob- 
inson, Danville, Eubank, Lebanon, Lincoln, Old 
Kentucky Home, Parksville, Perryville, Rosenwald, 
St. Charles, St. Joseph, Springfield. 

Barbourville Region — Barbourville, Bell County, 
Benham, Black Star, Corbin, East Benham, Evarts, 
Hall, Harlan, Hazel Green, Henderson Settlement, 
Knox Central, Lily, London, Loyall, Lynn Camp, 
Middlesboro, Pineville, Red Bird, Rockholds, Rosen- 
wald (Barbourville), Rosenwald (Harlan), Somer- 
set, Wallins, Wayne County, West Main. 

Elkhorn City Region — Belfry, Dunham, Elkhorn 
City, Flat Gap, Fleming-Neon, Hazard, Jenkins, 
Johns Creek, Martin, Napier, Paintsville, Pikeville, 
Virgie, Wayland, Whitesburg. 

Ashland Region — Ashland, Booker T. Washing- 
ton, Caitlettsiburg, Fairview, Inez, Meade Memorial, 
Raceland, Russell, Warfield, Wurtland. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1959 



Page Three 



TENNIS TOURNAMENTS 

On May 11 five regional tennis tournaments will 
be held. The sites are Bowling Green, Louisville, 
Jefferson County, Lexington, and Bellevue. The 
State Tennis Tournament will be held in Louisville 
on May 18-19. The assignment of schools by regions 
is as follows: 

Bowling Green Region — Bowling Green, Cald- 
well County, Caverna, Douglass, Elizabethtown, 
Fort Knox, Franklin-Simpson, Glasgow, Henderson, 
Hig'h Street, Hopkinsville, Madisonville, Owensboro, 
Owensboro Catholic, St. Joseph. 

Louisville Region — Atherton, Central, Flaget, 
Male, St. Xavier, Shawnee. 

Jefferson County Region — ^Durrett, Eastern, 
Fern Creek, Kentucky Military Institute, Louisville 
Country Day, Southern, Trinity, Valley, Waggoner. 

Lexington Region — Ashland, Berea Foundation, 
Danville, Franklin County, Grant County, Harrods- 
burg. Hazel Green, Millersburg- Military Institute, 
Paintsville, Paris, Sharpsburg, Somerset, University. 

Bellevue Region — Beechwood, Bellevue, Boone 
County, Dayton, Holmes, Lloyd. 

GOLF TOURNAMENTS 

Eigiht regional tournaments have been set up 
in golf. Tlhese tournaments will be held on May 20 
at Madisonville, Bowling Green, Louisville, Jeffer- 
son County, Dixie Heights, Danville, Middlesboro, 
and Paintsville. The State Golf Tournament will be 
held at Fort Knox on May 25-26. The assignment 
of schools by regions is as follows: 

Madisonville Region — Caldwell County, Doug- 
lass, Fulton, Greenville, Hartford, Henderson City, 
Hopkinsville, Madisonville, Mayfield, Owensboro. 

Bowling Green Region — Bowling Green, College, 
Elizabethtown, Fort Knox, Franklin-Simpson, Glas- 
gow, High Street, Russellville, Scottsville, Vine 
Grove. 

Louisville Region — DeSales, duPont Manual, 
Flaget, St. Xavier, Shawnee. 

Jefferson County Region — Butler, .Durrett, 
Eastern, Fern Creek, Kentucky Military Institute, 
Louisville Country Day, Oldham County, Seneca, 
Southern, Trinity, Valley, Waggener. 

Dixie Heights Region — Beechwood, Dayton, 
Dixie Heights, Highlands, Holmes, Lloyd, Maysville, 
Newport, St. Henry, St. Thomas. 

Danville Region — Bardstown, Danville, Frank- 
lin Couinty, Good Shepherd, Lebanon, Paris, St. 
Augustine, St. Joseph, Shelbyville, Somerset, Spring- 
field, University. 

Middlesboro Region — Cumberland, East Main 
Street, Hall, Lynn Camp, Middlesboro. 

Paintsville Region — Ashland, Boyd County, Haz- 
ard, Martin, Paintsville, Pikeville. 

BASEBALL TOURNAMENTS 

The district baseball tournaments are scheduled 
to be held on May 12-14. The dates should be set 
by the district tournament managers, and should 
represent the thinking of the majority of prin- 
cipals or coaches in the district involved. The 
regional tournaments will be held on May 27-28, 
and the State Baseball Tournament is scheduled 
to be played at Stoll Field, University of Kentucky 
Lexington on June 3-4. The assignment of schools 
to the various districts and regions is as follows: 
MURRAY REGION 

South Christian District — Attucks, Hopkinsville, 
South Christian, Trigg County. 

Murray District — Benton, Murray, Murray 
Training, North Marshall, South Marshall. 



Mayfield District — Central, Cuba, Fultom Coun- 
ty, iMayfield, Symsonia, Wingo. 

Paducah District — ^Ballard Memorial, Carlisle 
County, Heath, Lone Oak, Reidland, St. Johns, St. 
Mary's, Tilg'hman. 

Livingston Central District — Caldwell CoTmty, 
Crittenden County, Dotson, Fredonia, Livingston 
Central, Lyon County. 

HENDERSON REGION 

Henderson County District — Henderson City, 
Henderson County, Holy Name, Sebree. 

Irvington District — Breckinridge County, Flah- 
erty, Frederick Fraize, Hawesville, Irvington, 
Lewisport, Meade County. 

Hartford District — Beaver Dam, Centertown, 
Fordsville, Hartford. 

Owensboro District — Daviess County, Owens- 
boro Catholic, Owensboro Senior, Owensboro West- 
ern, Utica. 

Madisonville District — Calhoun, Earlington, 
Livermore, Madisonville, Sacramento, South Hop- 
kins. 

Greenville District — Bremen, Central City, 
Drakesboro, Drakesboro Community, Graham, 
Greenville, Hughes Kirk, Muhlenberg Central. 

Morganfield District — Clay, Morganfield, Provi- 
dence, St. Vincent, Sturgis. 

GLASGOW REGION 

Bowling Green District — ^Bowling Green, Col- 
lege, Franklin-Simpsoin, High Street, Lincoln, North 
Warren, Warren County. 

Russellville District — Adairville, Auburn, Guth- 
rie, Russellville, Tod-d County, Todd County Train- 
ing. 

Glasgow District — Austin 'I'racy, Bamche, 
Gamaliel, Glasgow, Hiseville, Scottsville, Temple 
Hill, Tompkinsville. 

Caverna District — Caverna, Culb Run, LaRue 
County, Memorial, Metcalfe County. 

Leitchfield District — Brownsville, Butler Coun- 
ty, Clarkson, Kyrock, Leitchfield, Sunfish. 

Campbellsville District — Adair County, Camp- 
bells'ville, Greensburg, Lebanon, Rosenwald, St. 
Augustine, St. Charles, St. Francis, Taylor County. 

St. Joseph District — Bardstown, Bloomfield, 
Fredericktown, Lebanon Junction, Mackville, Old 
Kentucky Home, St. Joseph, Shepherdsville, Spring- 
field. 

Vine Grove District — Elizabethtown, Elizabeth- 
town Catholic, Fort Knox, Glendale, Howevalley 
Lynnvale, Rineyville, Sonora. 

LOUISVILLE REGION 

St. Xavier District — Central, Flaget, St. Xavier, 
Shawnee. 

Manual District — Atherton, DeSales, duPont 
Manual, Louisville Male. 

Butler District — ^Butler, Durrett, Fern Creek, 
Southern, Valley. 

Trinity District — Eastern, Kentucky Military 
Institute, Louisville Country Day, Seneca, Trinity, 
Waggener. 

NEWPORT REGION 

St. Henry District — Boone County, Lloyd Me- 
morial, St. Henry, Simon Kenton, Walton-Verona. 

Beechwood District — Beechwood, Covington 
Catholic, Dixie Heigihts, Holmes, Holy Cross, Ludlow. 

Silver Grove District — Campbell County, High- 
lands, St. Thomas, Silver Grove. 

Grant County District — Butler, Falmouth, Grant 
County, Morgan, Williamstown. 

New{iort District — Bellevue, Dayton, Newport, 
Newport Catholic. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1959 



Maysville District — Bracken County, May's Lick, 
Maysville, Minerva, St. Patrick, Vanceburg-Lewis 
County. 

VERSAILLES REGION 

Frankfort District — Anderson, Frankfort, 
Franklin County, Midway, Scott County, Simmons, 
Versailles. 

Paris District — Carlisle, Cynthiaina, Harrison 
County, Millersburg- Military Institute, Nicholas 
County, North Middletown, Paris, Paris Western. 

Harrodsburg District — Buckeye, Camp Dick 
Robinson, Danville, Harrodsburg, Lancaster, Mercer 
County, Parksville. 

Crab Orchard District — ^Crab Orchard, Huston- 
ville. Liberty, Lincoln, McKinney, Memorial, Mid- 
dleburg, Mt. Vernon, Paint Lick, Stanford. 

Carrollton District — CarroUton, Eminence, Gal- 
latin County, Henry Central, Owen County, Pleasure- 
ville, Trimble County. 

Lexington District — ^Bryan Station, Henry Clay, 
Jessamine County, Lafayette, Lexington Catholic, 
University. 

Richmond District — Berea, Estill County, Irvine, 
Madison Central, Madison-Model. 

Shelbyville District — ^Bagdad, Lincoln Institute, 
Oldham County, Shelbyville, Simpsonville, Waddy. 
GRAYSON REGION 

Ashland District — Ashland, Boyd County, Cat- 
lettsburg. 

McKell District — Greenup, McKell, Russell, 
South Portsmouth, Wurtland. 

Mt. Sterling District — Camargo, DuBois, Mont- 
gomery County, Mt. Sterling, Owingsville, , Powell 
County, Shai-psburg, Winchester. 

Grayson District — Breckinridge Training, Flem- 
ing County, Hitchins, Olive Hill, Prichard, Rowan 
County, Sandy Hook. 

Paintsville District — Blaine, Ezel, Inez, Louisa, 
Meade, Morgan County, Oil Springs, Paintsville, 
Salyersville, VanLear, Warfield. 

Martin District — Auxier, Martin, Wayland, 
Wheelwrig-ht. 

MIDDLESBORO REGION 

Somerset District — Burnside, Ferguson, Mc- 
Creary, Monticello, Somerset, Wayne County. 

Pulaski County District — Eubank, Hazel Green, 
Lily, London, Pulaski County, Russell County. 

Lynch District — Cumberland, East Main Street, 
Evarts, Hall, Harlan, Loyall, Rosenwald. 

Middlesboro District — Bell County, Corbin, Hen- 
derson Settlement, Lone Jack, Middlesboro, Red 
Bird. 

Jenkins District — ^Carr Creek, Flemmg-Neon, 
Hindman, Jenkins, Whitesburg. 

Leslie County District — Hazard, Leatherwood, 
Leslie County, Napier. 

Elkhorn City District— Belfry, Elkhorn City, 
Johns Creek, Phelps, Pikeville, Virgie. 



Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association met at the K.H.S.A.A. 
building, Lexington, on Friday morning, March 20, 
1959. The meeting was called to order by President 
Russell Williamson at 9:00 with all Board members 
and Commissioiner Theo. A. Sanford present. 

Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by K. G. 
Gillaspie, that the reading of the minutes of the 
January meeting of the Board be waived, since the 
members of the Board had received copies of these 
minutes. The motion was carried unanimously. 



The Commissioner reported that Directors 
Robert P. Forsythe and K. G. Gillaspie had been 
re-elected to membership on the Board of Control 
for a four-year period, beginning July 1, 1959, to 
represent Sectioms 2 and 5 respectively. The Com- 
missioner reported that no candidates had filed 
against Messrs. Forsythe and Gillaspie. 

There was a discussion of possible proposals 
to be submitted by the Board of Control to the 
forthcoming Assembly of the K.H.S.A.A. The Com- 
missioner was authorized to submit the following 
proposals as Board proposals, on motiom of W. B. 
Jones, seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, the motion 
carrying imanimously: 

Proposal I — The Board of Control proposes that 
the last sentence of By-Law 20, Section 1, be amend- 
ed to read as follows: "No member school shall 
take part in any tournament or game from which 
any outside organization derives a financial profit 
from ticket sales, advertising, concessions, or any 
other source. Violation of this provision shall cause 
the offending school to be suspended from mem- 
bership in this association for a minimum period 
of six momths, or for a longer period, not to exceed 
one year as the Commissioner may decree." 

Proposal II — The Board of Control proposes 
that By-Law 30 be changed to read as follows: "All 
coaches and assistant coaches of athletic teams of 
members of this association shall be certified teach- 
ers and members of their regular school faculties. 
They shall be regularly employed by their Boards 
of Education, and their entire salaries shall be paid 
by such boards; they shall teach a minimum of 
three regular periods of classes, gymnasium, study 
halls, or other activity assignments within the 
school's schedule. All schools shall comply with 
this provision in order to qualify for and to main- 
tain membership in this association." 

Proposal III — The Board of Control proposes 
that the following be added to the second sentence 
of Tournament Rule 8: "except that the Commis- 
sioner shall have authority to permit the correction 
of any obvious error in certification." (clarification) 

Proposal IV — The Board of Control proposes 
that Tournament Rule V-B be amended to provide 
that the Commissioner shall have authority to as- 
sign State Tournament officials. 

Proposal V — The Board of Control proposes 
that Tournament Rule V-A be amended to provide 
that the Commissioner be authorized and directed 
to assign Regional Tournament officials, aind that 
no official shall be assigned to work the Tourna- 
ment in a region where he resides. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Jack Daw- 
son, that all bills of the Association, for the period 
beginning January 31, 1959, and ending March 19, 
1959, be approved. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

The Board was then called to order in its ca- 
pacity as Board of Directors of the K.H.S.A.A. 
Protection Fund. 

Secretary-Treasurer Sanford presented a list 
of claims which had been paid by the Protection 
Fund since January 31, 1959, the total amount of 
these claims being $6,320.83. W. B. Jomes moved, 
seconded by Louis Litchfield, that the claims as 
presented by the Secretary- Treasiurer of the Pro- 
tection Fund be allowed. The motion was carried 
unanimously. There being no further business, the 
meeting adjourned. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1959 



Page Five 



1959 Kentucky State High School Swimming Meet 

University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, February 28, 1959 



CLASS A 
Results 

Atherton 100 

Wag-gener 68 

Lafayette 48 

St. Xavier 48 

1. 400 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1 : Peskoe, Waggenor 
(6:00.2): Knopf, St. Xavier (5:29.7); 
Miniea, Waggener (5:33.8); Hubbuch, St. 
Xavier (5:37.8): Kausch, St. Xavier 
(5:51.3). 

Heat No. 2: Farmer, Waggener 
(5:16.8); Horton, St. Xavier (5:28.7); 
Dillion, Waggener (5:58.0): Dennis. Ath- 
erton (6:19.4); Mowen, Atherton (6:28.3). 

Heat No. 3: F. Freeman. Lafayette 
(4:57.1); IMonroe. Atherton (4:57.4); 
Hammonds, Lafayette (5:05.()): Bader, 
Atherton (6:07.1); D. Freeman, Lafayette 
(6:00.6) Durham, Lafayette (6:16.2). 

Finals 

1. F. Freeman, Lafayette 4:57.1 

2. Monroe. Atherton 4:57.4 

3. Peskoe, Waggener 5:00.2 

4. Hammonds. Lafayette 5:05.0 

6. Bader, Atherton 5:07.1 

6. Farmer, Waggener 5:16.8 

2. 50 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1: Roles, Eastern (:26.0); 
Higgs, Waggener ( :26.6) ; Sprauer, St. 
Xavier ( :27.0) ; Gehring, St. Xavier 
(:28.6): Easton, Manual ( :33.8) ; Daven- 
port, Holmes (:34.5). 

Heat No. 2: Daniels, Atherton ( :26.2) ; 
Knopf, St. Xavier ( :27.2) ; Worrell. La 
fayette ( :28.8) ; McCamish, Manual 
(:29.7); Mang, Holmes ( :30.8) ; Shouse, 
Waggener (:31.1). 

Heat No. 3: Fatten. Lafayette ( :26.5) ; 
Hammonds, Lafayette (:28.0): Ogle, Wag- 
gener (:28.6). Patterson. Manual ( :28.8) : 
Brown. Manual (:30.4). 

Heat No. 4 : Sturgeon, Atherton 
(:25.5l: Grunwald. Waggener ( :27.0) ; 
Cooke, Lafayette (:27.7): Aubrey, St. 
Xavier (:29.4); Hoffman, Atherton 
( :32.2). 

Heat No. 5, (run off I : Grunwald, 
Waggener ( :26.9) : Sprauer, St. Xavier 
( :26.6). 

Finals 

1. Sturgeon, Atherton 

2. Daniels. Atherton _ 

3. Roles, Eastern 

4. Grunwald, Waggene 
6. Patton, Lafayette - 
6 : Higgs, Waggener . 
3. 100 Yard Butterfly — 

Heat No. 1 : Bush, Atherton (1 :14.6) ; 
Eatmon, Manual (1:28.4); Schmitz, Wag- 
gener (1:30.9); 
(1:46.0). 

Heat No. 2 : 
(1:09.3) Wightmai 
Merkt, St. Xaviei 
Lafayette (1:34.0). 

Heat No. 3 
(1:11.6) Sullivan, 



Karsner, Lafayette i. 
2. 

Lococo, St. Xavier o 
Lafayette (1:20.8); ' 
(1 :28.8) ; Neubauer, ^• 



Abbott, Waggener 
t. Xavier (1:17.0); 
Liebschutz. Atherton (1:33.3); Neuman, 
Lafayette (1:39.6); Power, Manual 
(1:38.0). 



Finals 

1. Lococo. St. Xavier 1 :08.0 

2. Abbott, Waggener 1 :08,6 

3. Bush, Atherton 1 :11.0 

4. Sullivan, St. Xavier 1:16.7 

5. Wightman. Lafayette 1:21.9 

6. Eatmon. Manual 1:22.7 

4. 200 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1: Peskoe, Waggener 
(2:16,0); Bader. Atherton (2:22.0); Coy, 
St. Xavier (2:27.2); Knopf, St. Xavier 
(2:35.5); Hubbuch, St. Xavier (2:38.1); 
Royalty, Lafayette (2:49.0). 

Heat No. 2: Monroe, Atherton 
(2:16.2); Hammonds, Lafayette (2.21.7); 
Horton, St. Xavier (2:30.5); Freeman, 
Lafayette (2:51.6). 

Heat No. 3: Dillard, Lafayette 
(2:22.6); Farmer, Waggener (2:27.8); 
Miniea, Waggener (2:35.8); Peterson, 
Atherton (2:40.6); Mowen, Atherton 
(3:00.0). 

Finals 

1. Monroe, Atherton 2:09.6 

2. Peskoe, Waggener 2:11.5 

3. Bader, Atherton 2 :17.3 

4. Hammonds, Lafayette 2:17.9 

5. Dillard, Lafayette 2:18.3 

6. Coy, St. Xavier 2:28.9 

a. luo Yard Backstroke — 

rieat No. 1 ; Morrison, Atherton 
(1:11,3); Miniea, Waggener (1:13,2); 
lUaclhews, St. Xavier (1:15.4); Rausch, 
St. Xavier (1:19.9); Steimle, Manual 
(1:24.7); Metcalf, Atherton (1:26.4). 

Heat No. 2 : Langston, Lafayette 
(1 :09.9) ; Sympson, Lafayette (1 :12.7) ; 
Kurrie, Atherton (1:16.5); Ashford, Lafay- 
ette (1:22.2); Leet, Lafayette (1:28.5). 

Heat No. 3: Davis, Atherton (1.05.3); 
D. Abbott, Waggener (1:10.3); Tandy, St. 
Xavier (1:11.7); Doolittle, Waggener 
(1.23.1); Isaacs, Manual (1:23.6). 

Finals 

1. Davis, Atherton 1:05.0 

2. Langston, Lafayette 1:08.8 

3. D. Abbott, Waggener 1:09.4 

4. Tandy, St. Xavier 1:11.2 

5. Morrison, Lafayette 1:11.7 

6. Sympson, Lafayette Disqualified 

i>avis set a new state record in this 

event with his time of 1:05.0. 
6. 100 Yard Freestyle 

Heat No. 1 : Daniels, Atherton ( :59.6) ; 
Patton, Lafayette (1:01.9); Nelson, Wag- 
gener (1:07.2); De Van, Holmes (1:08.7); 
Shouse, Waggener (1:10.0); Hines, St. 
Xavier (1:10.7). 

Heat No. 2 : Sturgeon, Atherton 
( :59.0) : Coy, St. Xavier (1:02.1); Em- 
mert, Lafayette (1:04.0) Vetter, St. 
Xavier (1:10.3); Durham, Lafayette 
(1:14.0). 

Heat No. 3 : Freeman, Lafayette 
(:59.1); Roles, Eastern (1:00.6); Barr, 
Atherton (1:05.8) Gehring, St. Xavier 
(1:07.11: Wells, Atherton (1:07.6). 



Finals 
Sturgeon. Atherton :56.9 

2. Freeman, Lafayette :68.0 

3. Daniels, Atherton :68.6 

4. Roles, Eastern 1 :00.0 

6. Patton, Lafayette 1:01.3 

e. Coy, St. Xavier 1:04.0 

7. 100 Yard Breaststroke — 

Heat No. 1 : Henderson, Waggener 
(1:17.6); Diebold, St. Xavier (1:21.5); 



Combs. Lafayette (1:21.7); White, Manual 
(1:36.3). 

Heat No. 2: Remmers. St. Xavier 
(1:15.6): Reilly, St. Xavier (1:19.4); 
Neubauer, Lafayette (1:25.6); Miller, 
Waggener (1:28.1); Crosby, Manual 
(1:29.9). 

Heat No. 3 : Lawrence, Atherton 
(1:16.6); Roof, Atherton (1:19.8): Kivin- 
iemi. Lafayette (1 :22.2) : Stemmle, St. 
Xavier (1:23.3); Karsner, Lafayette 
(1:40.3). 

Finals 

1. Lawrence, Atherton 1 :12.6 

2. Remmers, St. Xavier 1:13.5 

3. Henderson, Waggener 1:16.4 

4. Reilly, St. Xavier 1:17.6 

6. Roof, Atherton 1 :18.0 

G. Diebold, St. Xavier 1:22.3 

8. Fancy Diving — 

Finals 

1. Craddock, Atherton 266.65 

2. Irion, Waggener 252.80 

3. Profumo, St. Xavier 224.16 

4. Trumpfeller, Waggener 222.15 

5. Frieberg. Atherton 208.05 

6. Patterson, Manual 195.20 

7. Heim, St. Xavier 189.35 

9. 150 Yard Individual Medley 

Heat No. 1 : Lococo, St. Xavier 
(1:46.8); Dillard, Lafayette (1:56.9): 
Eatmon, Manual (2:06.7); Vry, Lafayette 
(2:36.4). 

Heat No. 2 : J. Abbott, Waggener 
(1:46.1): D. Abbott, Waggener (1:48.1); 
Morrison, Atherton (1:60.0); Liebschutz, 
Atherton (2:42.4). 

Heat No. 3: Davis, Atherton (1:49.5) ; 
Langston, Lafayette (1:50.0); Remmers, 
St. Xavier (1:51.6); Tandy, St. Xavier 
(1:68.9) Merkt, St. Xavier (2:16.0). 

Finals 

1. J. Abbott, Waggener 1 :42.9 

2. Davis, Atherton 1:43.8 

3. Lococo, St. Xavier 1:45.3 

4. Morrison, Atherton 1:47.8 

5. D. Abbott, Waggener 1 :48,4 

6. Langston, Lafayette 1 :48.6 

10. 200 Yard Medley Relay — 

1. Athei-ton (Kurrie, Lawrence, Bush, 
Roof) 2 :02.4 

2. Waggener (Miniea. Henderson, 
Schmitz, Higgs) 2:04.4 

3. St. Xavier (Matthews, Reilly, Sul- 
livan. Knopf) 2:06.2 

4. Lafayette (Sympson, Combs, Wight- 
man, Worrell) 2:11.7 

5. Manual (Steimle, Vandyke, Power, 
Suhr) 2 :30,6 

11. 200 Yard Freestyle Belay — 

Finals 

1. Waggener (Grunwald. Nelson, Ogle, 
Irion) 1 :49,2 

2. Lafayette (Cooke, Royalty, Emmert, 
Hammonds) 1 :49.6 

3. St. Xavier (Aubrey, Sprauer, Vetter, 
Heim) 1 :52.3 

4. Atherton (Hoffman, Wells, Dennis, 
Barr) 1 =66.6 

6. Holmes (Mang, Hennessey, Davenport 
DeVan) 2 :05,9 

6. Manual (Easton, McCamish, Fisher, 
White) 2 :19.4 



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Page Eig'ht 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1959 



The Flying Dutchman 

Kentucky's Coach Adolph Rupp, who has 
taught Kentuckians many times how sports 
contests should be won, taught his greatest 
lesson in the N.C.A.A. tournament when he 
showed the world how to be victorious in 
defeat. The famed Kentuckian, in losing to 
a fine University of Louisville team, proved 
himself a gentleman, a sportsman and a com- 
petitor who can take it as well as dish it 
out. For his outstanding lesson in sports- 
manship, which will benefit Kentucky's youth 
for a long time to come, "The Baron of 
Basketball" is awarded the Dutchman's Corn 
Cob Pipe of Honor which goes each month 
to the individual rendering the greatest 
service to his fellow-men. 

Another salute to a Lexingtonian goes to 
Tommy Bell who has "closed the books" on 
a most colorful basketball officiating career. 
Tommy, who has officiated in every major 
tournament, first won acclaim as an official 
in the K.H.S.A.A. schoolboy classic. He went 
on to work the big tournaments all over the 
country. It is fitting that Tommy, who is 
one of the finest examples for young man- 
hood the Dutchman has ever known, should 
wind up his illustrious career on the top of 
the officiating world, working the finals of 
the N.C.A.A. tournaments. 

Cliff Harper, Commissioner of the Ala- 
bama High School Athletic Association, look- 
ed over the officiating at this year's Ken- 
tucky High School Athletic Association tour- 
nament and said one word, "Uniform." 
That's the greatest compliment which can 
be paid officiating. A dozen college coaches 
in Louisville for the N.C.A.A., journeyed to 
Lexington for the first round of the State 
High School Tournament and were in agree- 
ment that Kentucky is getting a fine brand 
of high school officiating. They asked, "How 
do they get the officials to call the same 
things the same way time after time?" 

Tommy Bell credits the clinics and schools 
for officials, which the K.H.S.A.A. has been 
sponsoring since 1940, for the uniform of- 
ficiating Kentucky is getting over the Com- 
monwealth. Harlan's "Tater" Combs agrees. 
Also drawing praise from the basketball of- 
ficials themselves is the sportsmanship of 
Kentucky's coaches. George Conley, Jim 
Baker, "Sid" Meade, Jack Thompson, Ralph 
Mussman and Charlie Irwin were heard to 
say that not one coach in the regions where 
they refereed left anything to be desired. 
Such youth leaders are a credit to our state. 




Sara Marcum 

It may well be that spectators, watching 
the Kentucky High School Tournament of- 
ficials in action, were looking at a couple of 
future public officials. Ashland's George Con- 
ley will be in the race for the State Senate 
while Ralph Mussman is making the race 
for the high office of Mayor of Newport. 
Anybody, who can handle the split-second 
decisions these arbiters regard as routine, 
can do a good job or Kentucky in any kind 
of situation. 

It is our humble opinion that back in the 
roaring forties Eastern State College turned 
out two tremendous competitors in Goebel 
Ritter and Fred Lewis. We have all been 
able to keep track of Goebel as he has re- 
written basketball coaching history at Haz- 
ard, but Fred sort of got away from us until 
we "bumped" into him at the National 
Coaches' Convention. Fred, whom the Dutch- 
man regards as the best set shot he has ever 
seen, is now coaching at Mississippi Southern. 
He has coached as far away as Hawaii. 

Remember Lus Oxley of Hazard, Ashland 
and all other parts of Eastern Kentucky, who 
officiated a lot of good basketball in state 
high school tournaments in the late forties. 
Lus came back for this year's tournament 
from Maryland where he is state manager 
for a large insurance company. Lus didn't 
come by train, he did not come by air, he 
came driving his own Cadillac. The moral 
here simply is "If you want to get rich, 
start by officiating basketball in the moun- 
tains of Kentucky." 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1959 



Page Nine 



Nominations for the Game Guy of 1959 
continue to roll in. The young sportsman 
who has overcome the greatest handicap to 
participate in sports under the K.H.S.A.A. 
program will receive the Flying Dutchman 
award at the annual high school athletic 
banquet scheduled during K.E.A. The 
strength of the Game Guy Program is the 
encouragement given youngsters who are 
handicapped physically by Game Guys who 
overcome their handicaps, refusing to feel 
sorry for themselves. 

Here is the list of nominations coming in 
this month: 

Marion Crowe, Superintendent of Midway 
Public Schools, praises Don Hall. Don's doc- 
tor told him he had "had it" after an arm 
injury. He was heart-broken but refused to 
be a quitter. Now Don is setting a good ex- 
ample for other kids. He is playing again. 

Clark Chesnut, principal of Hazel Green 
High School of East Bernstadt, tells us of a 
most unusual blind athlete who can well be 
a pattern. Fred Radar lives in Pittsburg, 
Kentucky, has been blind since birth, is 19 
years of age and will graduate from Hazel 
Green in May. Fred is a wrestler ; he runs the 
hundred yard dash, guiding himself by hold- 
ing to a piece of string; he puts the shot, 
throws the discus and does the broad jump. 
Add to all this his popularity and the fact 
that he is vice-president of the senior class, 
and the result is one Game Guy. 

Only once before in the long history of 
the Game Guys has a girl been entered in 
the competition. Now Vic Brizendine, veter- 
an basketball official, has discovered Sara 
Marcum at Elizabethtovra. She is quite a gal 
—guy. She is charming, vivacious and attrac- 
tive — but that is not what Vic noticed. Rath- 
er he saw a Kentucky thoroughbred who has 
real courage. Born with her right arm off 
below the elbow, she forgot it to take part 
in sports. Now check her record — for two 
years she has been a cheerleader at Elizabeth- 
town High School, she swims, plays tennis 
and Softball beside being chosen homecoming 
queen in 1958 and Boy Scout Queen in 1956. 
E'Town folks are challenged by her example 
to rise above her would-be handicap. This 
lass says she is too busy doing things to think 
about it. 

The Dutchman is gratified when letters 
come in telling what Kentuckians think of 
the awards. The following came from Jewell 
Logan of Dawson Springs: "The awards 
given by The Flying Dutchman are contrib- 
uting much to Kentucky's high school ath- 



letics. Your column is read and enjoyed by 
many sportsmen throughout the state." 

Gotta leave now to meet with the National 
Basketball Rules Committee to write next 
years rules. Heard Ted Sanford say once 
"You can't unscramble eggs." If you've been 
frustrated by the rules in the past, try a 
plate of eggs the Dutchman helps scramble. 
See you at the K.H.S.A.A. dinner with the 
Game Guys. 



BOARD MEMBERS RE-ELECTED 

(Continued from Page One) 

School Department. Mr. Forsythe was a 
"Certified" K.H.S.A.A. official for eight 
years, and worked in several State Tourna- 
ments. 

Mr. Gillaspie, who will continue to repre- 
sent Section 5, was born in Montgomery 
County, Kentucky, on December 21, 1905. He 
is a graduate of Mt. Sterling High School. 
He received his A.B. degree from Georgetown 
College, and his M.A. degree from Columbia 
University. He has done additional post- 
graduate work at Western Kentucky State 
College, George Peabody College, and the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky. 

In 1928 Mr. Gillaspie married Miss Martha 
Jane Thompson of Frankfort, who died in 
1936. In 1940 he married Mrs. Mary Will- 
oughby Scott of Georgetown. He has two 
step-daughters and four step-grandchildren. 

Mr. Gillaspie played basketball and foot- 
ball at Georgetown College. He was assistant 
coach at the Morganfield High School for 
four years. During his eleven-year tenure at 
Morganfield, he was principal for three years 
and superintendent for the last eight. He 
went to the Garth High School, Georgetown, 
in 1939 as principal, and has been superin- 
tendent at Georgetown since 1952. 

At the present time Mr. Gillaspie is secre- 
tary of the Georgetown Rotary Club and a 
director in the Central Kentucky Conference. 
He is Past President of the C.K.E.A., the 
Kentucky Association of Secondary School 
Principals, the Western Kentucky Athletic 
Conference, the Georgetown College Alumni 
Association, the Morganfield Kiwanis Club, 
and the Georgetown Rotary Club. He is Past 
Chairman of the Deacons of the Georgetown 
Baptist Church. He holds membership in the 
following: C.K.E.A., K.E.A., N.E.A., Pi Kappa 
Alpha, Pi Kappa Delta, Phi Delta Kappa, 
Kappa Delta Pi, Georgetown Baptist Church, 
and the Masonic Order. 



Page Ten THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1959 

1959 State Basketball Tournament Statistics 

Average Score: For Winners: 75, For Losers: 60. Total for both 135 per game 

Average No. Personal Fouls (fouls by A plus fouls by B) : 34 per game 

Average No. Times per game a player committed 5 Personals: .93 per game 

Total No. Free Throw Attempts (per. and T. for all games) 781. Successful 67.4% 

Total No. of Overtimes: 

DATA COLLECTED BY FIRST STATISTICIAN 

Average No. (a) Personal fouls made by players while on Offense 3.56 per game 

Average No. (b) Fouls involving dribbler and guard: 7.62 per game 

Average No. (c) Times dribbler committed foul : 1.69 per game 

Average No. (d) Times 2 throws were given unsuccessful thrower: 6.69 per game 

Average No. (e) Times a foul resulted in a bonus penalty: 12.19 per game 

% of times 1st throw in (e) was successful: 69.5% 

% of 2nd throws which were successful: 65% 

Average No. (f) Official warnings about actionless game: per game 

Average No. (g) Technical fouls for actionless game: per game 

Average No. (h) Times per game there was basket interf . or goal tend. : 

At player's own basket: per game 

At opponent's basket: per game 

Average Over-all time from first toss to final gun : 1 hour and 14 minutes 

DATA COLLECTED BY SECOND STATISTICIAN 

Average No. (a) Jump ball situations (include center jumps) : 10.62 per game 

(1) Times jumps followed held ball: .375 per game 

(2) Times held ball resulted from 5 sec. close guard .062 per game 

Average No. (b) Throw-ins from end of court (Excl. following goal) : 12.9 per game 

Average No. (c) Throw-ins from side: 11.8 per game 

Average No. (d) Times Off. handled ball for back court throw-in: 2.44 per game 

Average No. (e) Violations of 3-second lane rule: 1.25 per game 

Average No. (f) Violations of free throw rule 9-1: : .25 per game 

Average No. (g) Times ball remained alive after unsuc. free throw: 10.25 per game 

(h) % Times in (g) the free throw rebound was recovered by Defense: — 65.8% 

TABULATION OF VOTES ON HIGHEST RATED OFFICIALS - 19.59 STATE TOURNAMENT 

Listed below are the tabulations of votes on the twelve officials who received the high- 
est ratings by coaches of the sixteen teams which participated in the recent State High 
School Basketball Tournament. Each coach voted on six Certified officials in the order of 
his preference, the official whose name was listed first by the coach receiving six points, the 
second official five points, etc. This is the method which has been used for many years by 
the Board of Control and the Commissioner in selecting State Tournament officials. The 
schools given below are not listed in order by regions nor are they listed in the order of the 
tournament bracket. 

Official ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOP TOTAL 

George Conley — 5 3 2 6 5 5 2 2 30 

Charlie Irwin ___ 554 56 25 

Foster "Sid" Meade 611 33163 24 

James Baker 14 6 4 6 21 

Ralph Mussman _ 6 6 2 5 19 

"Doc" Ferrell ___ 5 4 3 3 4 19* 

Dick Betz 2 4 5 2 4 17 

Milford Wells -__ 4 4 6 1 15 

Roy Winchester — _ 1 1 4 5 1 2 14 

Dave Longenecker 3 2 3 3 2 1 14 

Shelby Winfrey _ 3 2 1 2 4 12 

Ben Edelen 3 3 5 11 

*Mussman and Ferrell were tied with 19 points each. The official who worked in the Tour- 
nament was determined by lot. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1959 



Page Eleven 



Olive Hill— Fourth Place Winner 
1959 State Basketball Tournament 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Paul Tackett, Benny Jones, G. J. Tackett, Herman 
Roe, John Short, Clyde Mauk, J. C. Smith, Ronald McClure, Larry iSparks, Dalemane Barker. 
Back Row: Paul Williams, Russell Tackett, Jim Schnell, Larry Williams, Larry Ader, Bert 
Greene, Coach Jack Fultz. 



1959 ANNUAL MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 
schools shall comply with this provision in 
order to qualify for and to maintain mem- 
bership in this association." 
PROPOSAL III 

The Board of Control proposes that the 
following be added to the second sentence of 
Tournament Rule 8: "except that the Com- 
missioner shall have authority to permit the 
correction of any obvious error in certifica- 
tion." (clarification) 

PROPOSAL IV 

The Board of Control proposes that Tour- 
nament Rule V-B be amended to provide that 
the Commissioner shall have authority to 
assign State Tournament officials. 
PROPOSAL V 

The Board of Control proposes that Tour- 
nament Rule V-A be amended to provide that 
the Commissioner be authorized and direct- 
ed to assign Regional Tournament officials, 
and that no official shall be assigned to work 
the Tournament in a region where he resides. 



PROPOSAL VI 

Prin. Clark E. Chesnut (Hazel Green) pro- 
poses that By-Law 4 be amended to read as 
follows : "A contestant becomes ineligible on 
his nineteenth birthdaiy, with the following 
exceptions: 1) If a student becomes nineteen 
ye^ars of age on or after September 1, he is 
eligible to compete in football for the re- 
mainder of that season; and 2) If a student 
becomes nineteen years of age on or after 
December 1, he is eligible to compete in all 
sports for the remainder of that school year." 
PROPOSAL VII 

Prin. Robert Campbell (Clay County) pro- 
poses that By-Law 4 be amended to provide 
that a player becoming twenty years of age 
during a tournament be permitted to com- 
plete that particular tournament only. 
PROPOSAL VIII 

Prin. P. P. Estrid'ge (Red Bird) proposes 
that By-Law 4 be amended to read as fol- 
lows: "A contestant becomes ineligible on 
his twentieth birthday except in the case of 
a senior contestant whose twentieth birth- 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1959 



day falls on the opening day or during a dis- 
trict, regional, or state tournament in any 
sport. He shall be eligible, as to age, so long 
as his team is in tournament competition. 
PROPOSAL IX 

Prin. Clinton B. Hammons (Knox Central) 
proposes that the following be substituted 
for the third sentence of Tournament Rule 
III-B: "Members must vote for schools, not 
towns, having a regulation size high school 
playing court 50 by 84 feet." 
PROPOSAL X 

Prin. Paul Ford Davis representing 23rd 
District Schools, proposes that Article IV, 
Section 1, of the K.H.S.A.A. Constitution be 
amended bv substituting "16" for 8 ; and 
that Article IV, Section 2-a, sentences one, 
two, five, and eight be amended by striking 
the word "section" and or "sections" and in- 
serting the word "region" and/or "regions," 
and that the words within the parenthesis 
in sentence one be amended to read "Basket- 
ball Regions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. 10, 
11, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16." 

PROPOSAL XI 

The 2nd District Secondary Principals' 
Association (President H'Earl Evans, Stur- 
gis) proDoses a new by-hw to read as fol- 
lows: "At the close of each fiscal year after 
all necessary onerating expenses for the uro- 
gram of the K.H.S.A.A. have been naid, 75 'I 
of the over-all profits of the K.H.S.A.A. for 
that fiscal year shall be divided equally 
among the member high schools of the state, 
and 25 ""V shall remain in the K.H.S.A.A. fund 
or be invested at the discretion of the Board 
of Control." 

PROPOSAL XII 

Prin. Jeff B. Mayes (Letcher) proposes 
thit Article IV, Section 2-c be changed to 
read as follows : "The princiioals of all mem- 
ber schools of the Association shall elect a 
Commissioner for a period of four years. The 
first election shall be held at the expiration 
'^f the present term of the Commissioner. 
Ballots shall be distributed bv the Commis- 
sioner to the princinals of all the member 
schools at least thirtv days before the elec- 
tion. The votes shall be counted bv the 
Board of Control in the presence of all can- 
didates. 

PROPOSAL XIII 

Prin. Jeff B. Mayes nroposes a new Article 
in the Constitution. Resoonsibility of the 
Principal, to read as follow;: "The principal 
of each school, in all matters pertaining to 
the athletic relations of his .school, is respon- 
sible to this Association (K.H.S.A.A.). He 
shall exercise control over all finances, the 



scheduling of contests, and all other matters 
involved in the management of his school's 
athletic program. Any school whose athletic 
program is managed by a non-school group 
shall not be eligible to hold membership in 
the Kentucky High School Athletic Associa- 
tion." ' PROPOSAL XIV 

The State Track Committee proposes that 
the Board of Control be authorized to rewrite 
the track rules, providing for semi-final 
meets to be held between the times of the 
regional meets and the state meet, and mak- 
ing other necessary changes in the track 
regulations to comply with the changed plan. 

Maysville Cheerleaders 

Cheerleaders representing the Maysville 
High School won first place in the fifth an- 
nual competition for the Cheerleaders' Cup, 
awarded by the Kentucky Association of Pep 
Organization Sponsors at the 1959 State 
Basketball Tournament. Runner-up honors 
went to the High Street High School girls, 
with honorable mention to the Olive Hill rep- 
resentatives. The presentation was made by 
K.H.S.A.A. President Russell Williamson 
during the award ceremony which followed 
the final game of the Tournament. The cheer- 
leaders were judged on the basis of a rating 
schedule which included ability, sportsman- 
ship, good conduct, and grooming. 
New Baseball Film 

A print of the AU-Star Baseball Game of 
1958 has been received by the K.H.S.A.A. 
from the National Federation office, and has 
been placed in the film library of the Univer- 
sity of Kentucky. It is a sound film in color, 
running approximately thirty minutes. It is 
available for immediate booking. Twentv-five 
all-stars from the American League defeat 
an equal number of National League greats 
by a score of 4-3 at Baltimore. Close-ups of 
the baseball stars of today and interesting 
plays of the game are shown in the film. 
High Jump Record 

The national interscholastic high jump 
record of 6 feet 9 3 '4 inches currently held 
bv Walter Mangum, Jr., was established in 
1956. To establish a new record is the goal 
of many boys, particularly three from the 
Southern Section of the California Inter- 
scholastic Federation. These three boys, Paul 
J. Stuber from Bellflower High School. John 
Foust from Culver City High School, and 
R^y Nlckleberry from Oxnard High School, 
will have their last opportunity to attain 
this objective during the present Spring. 
Stuber has a best mark of 6 feet 9 inches, 
and Foust and Nickleberry have each cleared 
6 feet 8 inches. 



We SHipTiRe Day You BuV" 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

103 ~ PHONES — 104 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

IT'S PLAY TIME 

Outdoor playground programs will be conducted in many schools during 
summer months. 

Our stock is complete on all types of playground and play time equipment. 

Try our "WE SHIP THE DAY YOU BUY" service on: 
Basketballs 

Basketball goals 

Volleyballs --- ;■ 

Volleyball nets and posts 

Playground balls of all sizes 
Softballs and softball bats 

Badminton racquets and shuttlecocks 
Nets and complete badminton sets 

Regulation horseshoes in steel and rubber 
Shuffleboard sets and supplies 

Tennis racquets, nets and balls 

If you plan to have baseball in connection with your recreation program, 
we have a comolete stock of uniforms, shoes, bats, balls and gloves in Little 
League, Babe Ruth League and regulation sizes. 

Please write or call for complete information and prices, and our salesmen 
will be glad to call or give you any information and assistance you may 
need. 

We extend a heartv welcome to you and your friends to make our sample 
room at the Kentucky Hotel your headquarters during K.E.A. in Louis- 
ville. We will have a comolete showing of baseball, softball, track, tennis, 
and other spring sports. We will also have new football and basketball 
samples for the coming 1959 and 1960 season ; also a complete line of award 
jackets, sweaters, blankets, trophies, etc. 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

INCORPORATED 

PHONE 103 OR 104 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 




UTCLIFFE CP. 

LOUISVILLE H, KENTUCKjY.. .., 

' » ■■■■ ■.r--v.::-..iv: 




Hiqh School AthM9 



TRINITY HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS "B" CHAMPION— 1959 



IHMiailMiHHWHHiiBeia 

tHmaMpwaninninBi 
a»M — iwp— I— I— jM 

■MMMHIiWMMil— lai! 



^E^^^i ^' 





(Left to Right) Front Row: Joe Hayden, Marty Parentice, Albert Hoskins, Jack Hubbard, 
Robert Cusick, and Jim Call. Second Row: Henry Bellows, Doug Finnegan, Rick Panther, Ken 
Elliott, Tony Brian, Steve Monohan, John Meredith, and Coach Dave Kraus. 



OfHcial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

MAY - 1 a 5 B 




Bellevue H. S. Swimming Team-^Class "C" Champion — 1959 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Rudy Wuilleumier, Ron Heidebrink, Harry Bevis, Jim Cavana. 
Second Row: Pete Heister, Larry Loughnane. Third Row: Dan Boeh, Jim Rhein, Bill RiddelL 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXI— NO. 10 



MAY, 1959 



1.00 Per Year 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 



The forty-second annual meeting of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
was held at the Brown Hotel, Louisville, on 
Thursday afternoon, April 16, 1959. 

President Russell Williamson called the 
meeting to order at 2:30, and asked Com- 
missioner Theo. A. Sanford to call the roll of 
delegates. Fifty-eight regularly elected dele- 
gates or alternates answered the roll call. 
The following delegates were seated in the 
absence of the delegates or alternates from 
their respective districts: Harold Hunter, 
D. 18 ; Delbert Walden, D. 32 ; Zeb Blanken- 
ship, D. 44; Roy Allison. D. 45; Oran Teater, 
D. 59; and Tom Evans, D. 62. 

Woodrow Crum moved, seconded by Oran 
Teater, that the minutes of the 1958 annual 
meeting of the Association, which had been 
sent previously to all member schools, be 
approved without being read. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Commissioner Sanford then gave a report 
on the activities of the Association during 
the 1958-59 school year. (The report of the 
Commissioner appears elsewhere in this issue 
of the magazine) . 

President Williamson announced that Rob- 
ert P. Forsythe and Kenneth G. Gillaspie had 
been re-elected without opposition to mem- 
bership on the Board of Control for a four- 
year period, beginning July 1, 1959, to rep- 
resent Sections 2 and 5 respectively. 

President Williamson stated that consid- 
eration of the proposals was the next order 
of business. 

Commissioner Sanford stated that the 
Board of Control, which was presenting Pro- 
posal I, providing that no member school 
shall take part in any tournament or game 
from which any outside organization derives 
a financial profit, wished to add the follow- 
ing sentence to the Proposal : "Should a game 
or tournament be played in a gymnasium or 
other location where a catering company or 
similar organization holds a contract for con- 
cessions and/or advertising, this provision as 
it relates to concessions and/or advertising 



shall not apply." Cecil Reid moved, seconded 
by Oran Teater, that Proposal I as amended 
be adopted. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

Homer Bickers moved, seconded by Zeb 
Blankenship, that Proposal H, dealing with 
the certification and duties of coaches, be 
amended by adding the following: "In the 
event a school does not employ male teach- 
ers, such school may make application to the 
Commissioner for a temporary waiver of this 
rule. If in the opinion of the Commissioner 
the request is justified, he may waive this 
rule, but in no case shall such waiver ex- 
tend beyond the school year for which such 
request was made." The amendment carried 
by a vote of 41-17. Andrew Renick moved, 
seconded by Homer Bickers, that Proposal 
II as amended be adopted. The motion was 
carried. 

Kenneth Kuhnert moved, seconded by 0. 
J. Mitchell, that Proposal III, giving the Com- 
missioner authority to permit the correction 
of certification errors in tournament lists, 
be adopted. The motion was carried. 

Earl Duncan moved, seconded by Willis G. 
Wells, that Proposal TV, giving the Commis- 
sioner authoritv to assign State Basketball 
Tournament officials, be tabled. The motion 
was carried. 

Harold Storm moved, seconded by A. R. 
Rochelle, that Proposal V, authorizing the 
Commissioner to assign regional basketball 
officials, be adopted. The motion failed to 
carry. 

Arthur Mullins moved, seconded by Pete 
Grigsby, that Proposal VI, providing that a 
contestant shall become ineligible on his 
nineteenth birthday, with certain exceptions, 
be tabled. The motion was carried. 

John Heber moved, seconded by Andrew 
Renick. that Proposal VII, providing that a 
player becoming twenty years of age during 
a tournament be permitted to complete that 
tournament, be tabled. The motion was 
carried. 

(Continued om Page Ten) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1959 



MAY, 1959 



VOL. XXI— NO. 10 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexing:ton, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1S79. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (195S-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones, (1957-61) Somerset: W. H. Crowdus 
(1658-62) Franklin; Jack Dawson (1958-62). Louisville: Robert 
P. Forsythe (1955-59), Greenville: K. G. Gillaspie (1955-59), 
Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jirom the Comynlsslone'i s Dffl 



tee 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1958-59 Basketball Participation list 
(Eligibility). 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials. 

3. Official's Report on Schools — Basket- 
ball. 



Protection Fund News 

The K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund, which 
has been operating since 1939, will go out of 
business on June 30, 1959. This decision was 
made by the Board of Control in its meeting 
held in Louisville during K.E.A. The reason 
for the action of the Board was twofold. 
The Kentucky Department of Insurance re- 
cently had raised the question concerning 
whether or not the Protection Fund, a sub- 
sidiary of an educational organization, could 
legally be in the insurance business. Secondly, 
it has been apparent for some time that the 
protection given under the provisions of the 
current program was many times inadequate. 

The plans of three commercial companies 
have been approved to date by the Board of 
Control. For 1959-60, the Bcjard will allow 
an insurance credit of $30.00 with one of 
these companies to each school for "all sports 
except football," and an additional credit of 
$30.00 to each school maintaining a football 
team. Schools insuring their athletes in other 
companies of their choice will also probably 
be allowed the credit mentioned. 
State Track Committee 

The State High School Track Meet, sche- 
duled to be held in Lexington on May 22-23, 
will be managed by William McCubbin of the 
U. K. Physical Education staff. Other mem- 
bers of the Committee are: Preston Holland, 
Murray; Don Shelton, Henderson; Turner 



Elrod, Bawling Green ; Scott Smith, Ft. Knox ; 
Eddie Weber, Louisville ; Joe Curtsinger, 
Louisville ; John Schaar, Bellevue ; Joe Brum- 
mett, Danville ; Herb Tye, Barbourville ; Ar- 
thur Mullins, Elkhorn City ; and Ernie Chat- 
tin, Ashland. These regional managers will 
assist Mr. McCubbin in conducting the State 
Meet. 

Fines for Late Reports 
More than 140 member schools had not 
filed their reports on basketball officials and 
their basketball participation (eligibility) 
lists for the 1958-59 season when this issue 
of the ATHLETE went to press. Some 600 
basketball officials have not filed their re- 
ports on member schools. The Board of Con- 
trol has established a fine of $5.00 for both 
schools and officials delinquent with their 
reports. A deadline of June 15 has been set 
for the filing of all reports required under 
Association rules. Officials who have not 
worked any games should notify the K.H.S. 
A.A. office accordingly. Such notification is 
considered a report. 

Golf Tournaments 

The eight regional golf tournaments, the 
sites of which were given in the April issue 
of the ATHLETE, will be managed by the 
following men: Principal Weldon Hall, Madi- 
sonville High School ; Athletic Director Elvis 
Donaldson, Bowling Green High School ; Mr. 
Charlton Hummel, Louisville Male High 
School ; Ass't Principal Oz Johnson, Valley 
High School; Principal W. N. Shropshire, 
Dixie Heights High School ; Supt. John Rob- 
inson, Danville City Schools; Mr. Julian 
Pitzer, Middlesboro; and Supt. Oran Teater, 
Paintsville City Schools. The State Golf Tour- 
nament will be held at Ft. Knox on May 25-26. 
and will be managed by Coach John Hackett 
of the Ft. Knox High School. Principals who 
have not received their entry blanks should 
write to their respective managers for these 
forms. 

Tennis Tournaments 

Five regional tournaments will be held in 
tennis this year. There will be two tourna- 
ments for the Louisville and Jefferson Coun- 
ty schools, both managed by Coach Emmett 
Goranflo of the Eastern High School. The 
other three tournaments will be managed 
by Coach Ted Hornback of Bowling Green, 
Coach Eugene Huff of Lexington, and Coach 
Roger Klein of Bellevue. The State Tennis 
Tournament will be held in Louisville on May 
18-19, and will be managed by Coach Goran- 
flo. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1959 



Page Three 



1959 Kentucky State High School Swimming Meet 

University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, Classes B & C, April 4, 1959 



CLASS "B" 
Results 

1. 50 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1 : Pohlman, Trinity ( :26.2) ; 
Pierce, Danville ( :28.4) ; Koltak, St. Jos- 
eph (:28.7); Ball, Ft. Kno.x (:28.9|; 
Hutchinson, Highlands ( :30.5). 

Heat No. 2 : Fiske. Foundation 
(:26.6); Fisher, Ft. Kncx (:27.2); Al- 
bers, St. Joseph ( :27.8) ; Peters, St. 
Joseph ( :31.SJ : Heinze, Highlands (34.41; 
Salstrom, Foundation (:36.6). 

Heat No. 3: Fulmer, Highlands 
( :25.8j ; Prince, K.M.I. ( :26.8) ; Gross- 
man, Foundation ( :28.8). Feldbaum, 
Seneca ( :31.5) : Yang, Foundation (31.91; 
Ryan, Seneca (:35.1l. 

Heat No. 4: Brian, Trinity ( :26.0) ; 
Wright, Danville ( :26.7) : Trogmorton, St. 
.Joseph (:28.2|; Petrey. Ft. Knox (:32.4). 

Finals 

1. Brian. Trinity :25.9 

2. Fulmer. Highlands :26.0 

3. Pohlman. Trinity :26.2 

4. Wright. Danville :26.5 

5. Fiske, Foundation :26.4 

6. Prince, K.M.I. :26.6 



2. 10 



Yard Breaststroke 



Heat No. 1 : Blair, K.M.I. (1 :22.8| ; 
Cusick, Trinity (1:29.81: Black, Highlands 
(1:31.8); Dingus, Foundation (1:38.8). 

Heat No. 2: Boone, Highlands (1.20.8) ; 
Hoskins, Trinity 11:23.7); Stivers, High- 
lands (1:26.7); Harris, K.M.I. (1:32.2). 

Heat No. 3: Thompson, Seneca 
(1:23.6) Wehrle, Foundation (1:23.7); 
Stambaugh, Highlands (1:24.9); McClure. 
K.M.I. (1:25.9); Cai-michael, Newport 
(1:39.3). 



Heat No. 4: Hayden, Trinity (1:23.9); 
Baldwin. K.M.I. (1 :28.8) ; Stacy, Founda- 
tion (1:31.8); Purcell, St. Joseph (1:37.0). 

Heat No. 5: Panther, Trinity (1:16.1); 
Isham, Ft. Knox (1:27.1); Ray, Ft. Knox 
(1:28.7); Koslove, Seneca (1:39.5); Gand- 
er, Danville (1:49.8). 

Finals 

Panther, Trinity 1:16.0 

Boone, Highlands 1:20.4 

Blair, K.M.I. 1:22.1 

Hoskins. Trinity 1 :22.1 

Wehrle, Foundation 1 :24.4 

Thompson. Seneca 1:26.5 

Panther set a new state record in this 
event with his time of 1:16.0. 

3. 100 Yard Backstroke — 

Heat No. 1: Kercher, Seneca (1:16.5) ; 
Stoneburner, Highlands (1:16.6); Kennell, 
St. Joseph (1:20.7); Seifried, Newport 
(1:22.2); McClure, Foundation (1:29.6). 

Heat No. 2 : Fiske, Foundation 
(1:09.6); Conners, Highlands (1:18.4); 
Tuttle, K.M.I. (1:22.2) Yang, Foundation 
(1:25.6); Hensley, Danville (1.33.7). 

Heat No. 3 : Monohan, Trinity 
(1:12.3); Bellows, Trinity (1:18.6); Da- 
vis, K.M.I. (1:22.2); White, Ft. Knox 
(1:23.6); Ryan, Seneca (1:37.2). 

Heat No. 4: Dorsey, Highlands 
(1:15.5); Call, Trinity (1:19.2); Hubbard. 
Trinity (1:23.2); Tekulve, St. Joseph 
(1:26.3); Barquist, Ft. Knox (1:29.6); 
Yang, Foundation (1:32.6). 

Fiske set a new state record in this 
event with his time of 1 :09.6. 



Finals 

Fiske. Foundation 
Monohan. Trinity __ 
Dorsey, Highlands . 
Stoneburner. Highla 



_1:10.0 
-1:12.4 
_1:14.5 
_1:15.3 



5. Kercher, Seneca 1:16.4 

6. Conners, Highlands 1:24.5 

4. 100 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1: Reik, Highlands (:58.4): 
Finnegan, Trinity ( :59.1 ) ; Thornburgh. 
St. Joseph (1:11.5); Sanders, Danville 
(1:15.1); Bedzyk, Ft. Knox (1:15.5). 

Heat No. 2 : Meredith. Trinity 
(1:00.4); Brik, Ft. Knox (1:04.2); Baker, 
Foundation (1:13.0); Sherrard, St. Jos- 
eph (1:14.4); Snodgras, Foundation 
(1:19.8). 

Heat No. 3: Fulmer, Highlands 
(:5S.4); Ferrell, Ft. Knox (1:06.0); Vol- 
lette, K.M.I. (1:11.0); Hite, St. Joseph 
(1:19.9); Weissinger, Danville (1:20.1). 

Heat No. 4: Herrlinger, K.M.I. 
(:59.9); Smith, Foundation (1:05.0); Mc- 
Kenzie, Highlands (1:09.5); McGraw, 
Highlands (1:14.1): Nichols. Foundation 
(1:15.2). 

Finals 

1. Herrlinger, K.M.I. :58.4 

2. Reik, Trinity :58.6 

3. Finnegan, Trinity :59.4 

4. Fulmer, Highlands :59.5 

5. Meredith, Trinity :59.9 

6. Brink. Ft. Knox 1:04.9 

Reik, Fulmer, and Herrlinger set a 

new state recerd in this event with their 
time of :58.4. 

5. Fancy Diving — 

Finals 

1. Bill Fisher. Ft. Knox 185.75 

2. Donna Glass, Highlands 158.40 

3. Wni. Barnhorst, St. Joseph 154.20 

4. Jim Reiskamp. Covington Cath. 148.85 

5. Marty Parentice, Trinity 146.60 

6. Jennifer Keitz, Highlands 138.95 

7. George Roberts. Foundation___136.05 



TEAM SCORING— Class "B" 



TEAM 






T3K 



Trinity 

Hig:hlands 

Kentucky Military Inst 

St. Joseph 

Ft. Knox 

.Foundation 

Danville 

Seneca 

Coving-ton Grant 

Newport 

Dixie Heights 



10 


5 


5 


8 


4, 

















2 


7 








1 


2 





















14 


14 


8 


6 


10 





6 


10 


2 


8 


4 








4 














. 


2 









62 

46 

22 

20 

18 

15 

7 

3 

3 

2 





Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1959 



TEAM SCORING— Class "C 



TEAM 


50 Yard 
Freestyle 


TO <D 


0) 




200 Yard 

Medley 

Relay 


01 


3.S 

o'o 




12 
5 
5 


8 
4 
9 


10 
6 
6 


7 
7 
5 


14 

8 

10 


10 
14 



61 




44 


University . 


35 







6. 200 Yard Medley Relay — 

Heat No. 1 : K.M.I. (Tuttle, Blair, 
Herrlinger. Prince) 2 :08.1 ; Highlands 
(Stoneburner, Boone, Stambaugh, Reikt 
2:10.6; St. Joseph (Tekulve, Purcell, 
Thornburgh, Koltak) 2:16.2; Newport 
(Seifried. Strunk, Neal, Quigley) 2:31.4. 

Heat No. 2 : Trinity (Monohan, Pan- 
ther, Hoskins, Brian) 2:08.3; Founda- 
tion (Roberts, Stacy, Wehrle, Smith) 
2:21.0; Ft. Knox (White. Isham, Bedzyk, 
Barquist) 2:23.4; Seneca (Kercher, Thomp- 
son, Kozlove, Feldbaum) 2 :25.4. 
Finals 

1. Trinity (Monohan, Panther, 
Hoskins, Brian) 2:04.3 

2. K.M.I. (Tuttle, Blair, 
Herrlinger, Prince) 2:09.2 

3. Highlands (Stoneburner, Boone, 
Stambaugh, Reik) 2:10.1 

4. St. Joseph (Tekulve, Purcell, 
Thornburgh, Koltak) 2:18.4 

5. Foundation ( Roberts, Stacy, 
Wehrle. SmithI 2:20.9 

6. Ft. Knox (White, Isham, 

Bedzyk, Barquist) 2:25.0 

Trinity set a new state record in this 
event with the time of 2:04.3. 

7. 200 Yard Freestyle Relay — 

Heat No. 1 : Trinity (Finnegan, 
Parentice, Pohlman, Meredith) 1:49.3; 
Ft. Knox (Ferrell. Brink, Ray. Ball) 
1 :52.5 : Newport (Lienhardt, Simpson, 
Thacker, Quigley) 2:02.4; K.M.I. (Bald- 
win, Davis, McClure, VoUette) 2:03.0. 

Heat No. 2 : St. Joseph (Barnhorst, 
Albers, Kennell, Throgmorton) 1 :51.2 ; 
Highlands (Conners, Fulmer, Bootes. Dor- 



sey) 1:54.8: Danville (Minor, Hoff- 
meyer. Pierce, Wrightl 2:01.2; Founda- 
tion (Grossman. Baker, Buckland, Mc- 
Clure I 2:03.0. 

Finals 



Trinity (Finnegan. Parentice, 

Pohlman, Meredith) 1 

St. Joseph (Barnhorst. Albers, 

Kennell, Throgmorton) 1 

Ft. Knox (Ferrell, Brink, Ray, 

Ball) 1 

Highlands (Conners, Fulmer, 

Bootes, Dorsey) 1 

Danville (Minor, Hoffman, 

Pierce. Wright) 1 

Newport ( Lienhardt, Simpson, 
Quigley, Thacker) 1 

CLASS "C" 
Results 

50 Yard Freestyle- 
Finals 

Cavana, Bellevue 

Bevis, Bellevue 

Shier, University 

Southgate. Beechwood 

Miner, Beechwood 

Seay, University 

50 Yard Butterfly- 



IB. 1 
53.7 
56.0 



50 Yard Backstroke- 
Finals 



Boeh, Bellevue 

Harris, University 

Elo, Beechwood 

Heister, Bellevue 

Southgate, Beechwood _ 
Armstrong. University 
Fancy Diving — 



33.6 

34.4 
37.3 
37.6 
40.2 



1. Wade, Un 



Finals 

rsity _ 



Belle 

en, Beechwood 

ill'eumier, Bellevue 

man. University 



33.6 
36.6 
37.3 
37.4 
40.3 



Finals 

1. Jim Cavana. Bellevue 114.75 

2. Sandy Queen, University 85.75 

3. Bill Deupree, Beechwood 78.10 

4. Gregg Southgate, Beechwood 73.75 

5. 200 Yard Medley Relay — 

Finals 

1. Bellevue (Boeh, Riddell, 

Rhein, Bevis) 2:20.3 

2. University (Harris, Shier, 

Wade, Sasman) 2:22.5 

3. Beechwood (Elo, Castleman, 

Allen, Kingsbury) 2:23.4 

Bellevue set a new state record in this 

event with the time of 2:20.3. This is 

a new event. 

6. 200 Yard Freestyle Relay- 

Finals 

1. Beechwood (Southgate, Pierce, 
Miner, Kingsbury) 1:58.6 

2. Bellevue (Lawrence. Heister, 
Loughnane, Heidebrink) 2:12.1 

3. University (Flynn. Armstrong. 

Cole, Seay) Disqualified for Take-Off 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at the 
Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, on Fri(3ay morn- 
ing, April 17, 1959. The meeting was called 
to order by President Russell Williamson at 
9:00, with all Board members. Commissioner 
Theo. A. Sanford, and Assistant Commis- 
sioner J. B. Mansfield present. 

Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by Jack 
Dawson, that the reading of the minutes of 
the March 20th meeting be waived, since the 
members of the Board had received copies 
of these minutes. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

The Commissioner gave a brief report on 
State Tournament receipts and expenses. He 
stated that total receipts would approximate 
$111,000.00, and he estimated that profit to 
the Association would be a figure close to 
$82,000.00. 



Chairman K. G. Gillaspie of the Insurance 
Committee and Commissioner Theo. A. San- 
ford made a report for the Committee. After 
a general discussion of insurance problems 
and recommendations of the Kentucky De- 
partment of Insurance, Robert P. Forsythe 
moved, seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, that the 
Protection Fund go out of business on June 
30, 1959. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

Messrs. Gillaspie and Sanford then pre- 
sented three commercial insurance plans, 
which might be recommended to K.H.S.A.A. 
member schools. These plans were made 
available by the following: Pilot Life Insur- 
ance Company, Greensboro, North Carolina; 
Continental Casualty Company, Chicago, 
Illinois, presented by the R. R. Sullivan 
Agency of Louisville; Old Security Life In- 
surance, Chicago, Illinois, presented by Al- 
bert Knapp and Associates of Cincinnati, 
Ohio. W. B. Jones moved, seconded by Cecil 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1959 



Page Five 



A. Thornton, that the three insurance plans 
as presented by the Committee be recom- 
mended to Association member schools by 
the Board of Control. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by Robert 
P. Forsythe, that the Board of Control for 
1959-60 allow an insurance credit of $30.00 
to each school for "all sports except football," 
and an additional credit of $30.00 to each 
school maintaining a football team. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

There was a discussion of possible re- 
districting in basketball. Louis Litchfield 
moved, seconded by W. B. Jones, that the 
following redistricting in basketball be made 
in 1959-60 : move Trigg County from District 
5 to District 7, and move Dawson Springs 
from District 6 to District 7 ; move Woodford 
County from District 42 to District 41, and 
move Jessamine County from District 43 to 
District 42 ; move Menifee County from Dis- 
trict 61 to District 62. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

The Commissioner announced the resigna- 
tion of John Heber as Chairman of the State 
Track Committee. He stated that he had ap- 
pointed William McCubbin as manager of 
the Lexington regional track meet, and 
recommended that Mr. McCubbin be named 
manager of the State Track Meet. W. B. 
Jones moved, seconded by Cecil A. Thorn- 
ton, that the recommendation of the Com- 
missioner be accepted. The motion was car- 
ried unanimously. 

The Commissioner proposed that an Ath- 
letic Injury Prevention Conference be sub- 
stituted for the baseball and track clinics, 
which have previously been held on the first 
day of the annual University of Kentucky 
Clinic for Coaches. He stated that he had 
been in contact with representatives of the 
Kentucky State Medical Association, and 
that he believed that this organization would 
be interested in conducting the Athletic Li- 
jury Prevention Conference on the first day 
of the 1959 U. K. Coaches' Clinic, which 
would be August 12. Louis Litchfield moved, 
seconded by Robert P. Forsythe, that the 
Kentucky State Medical Association be ask- 
ed to conduct an Athletic Injury Prevention 
Conference at Lexington on August 12, 1959, 
and that the usual K.H.S.A.A. clinics in 
baseball and track be omitted for this year 
if the conference is held. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that the summer meeting of the 
Board be held in northern Kentucky late in 



July, on a date and at a site to be determined 
by the Commissioner. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by W. 
H. Crowdus, that the delegate and alternate 
to the forthcoming summer meeting of the 
National Federation be W. B. Jones and K. G. 
Gillaspie respectively. The motion was car- 
ried unanimously. 

The meeting adjourned to reconvene after 
2:00 P. M. 

Clyde Reeves of the State Fair Board, ac- 
companied by several representatives of 
Louisville hotels, transit agencies, and the 
Louisville Chamber of Commerce, met with 
the Board of Control to discuss the possibil- 
ity of the location of the 1960 State High 
School Basketball Tournament at Freedom 
Hall in Louisville. After the visitors had 
answered numerous questions asked by mem- 
bers of the Board, they were asked to retire. 
Robert P. Forsythe moved, seconded by W. 
H. Crowdus, that a vote by secret ballot be 
taken concerning the location of the 1960 
State Basketball Tournament at Louisville or 
Lexington, providing that satisfactory ar- 
rangements can be made. All voted "Aye" 
except Cecil A. Thornton and K. G. Gillaspie, 
who voted "No." A ballot was then taken, 
which resulted in Louisville receiving five 
votes and Lexington three. W. B. Jones 
moved, seconded bv Louis Litchfield, that a 
rental fee of $9,000.00 be offered to Clyde 
Reeves of the State Fair Board for use of 
Freedom Hall as the site of the State High 
School Basketball Tournament in 1960. The 
motion was carried. The proposal of the 
Board was accepted by Mr. Reeves. 

President Williamson named K. G. Gillas- 
pie, W. B. Jones and Cecil A. Thornton as 
members of the Budget Committee for 1959- 
60. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by W. B. 
Jones, that all bills of the Association be- 
ginning March 20, 1959, and ending April 16, 
1959, be allowed. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

The Board was then called to order in its 
capacity as Board of Directors of the K.H.S. 
A.A. Protection Fund. Secretary-Treasurer 
Sanford presented a list of claims which 
had been paid by the Protection Fund since 
March 20, 1959, the total amount of these 
claims being $2,249.94. K. G. Gillaspie moved, 
seconded by Louis Litchfield, that the claims 
as presented by the Secretary-Treasurer of 
the Protection Fund be allowed. The motion 
was carried unanimously. There being no 
further business, the meeting adjourned. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1959 



The Flying Dutchman 

When Fred Radar stood before an audience 
of five hundred school men, coaches and their 
wives to receive his Game Guy Award at the 
K.H.S.A.A. banquet, he made us all feel proud 
and humble. 

We had to be proud that Kentucky can 
produce young men with Fred's courage, 
and we had to be humble in the presence of 
this blind boy who taught us all the real 
meaning of "Fight." 

Here was a kid, blind since birth, living 
normally and happily engaging in the K.H.S. 
A. A. sports program ; here was a lad telling 
all other handicapped youngsters that noth- 
ing can keep a Game Guy down. 

Board member W. B. Jones did a master- 
ful job in presenting the award to Fred as 
did, also, W. H. "Johnny" Crowdus who pre- 
sented the Co-Game Guy Award to Elizabeth- 
town's Paul Kerrick. Paul received the trophy 
for Sara Marcum. Sara was vacationing in 
Florida with her mother. 

"Johnny" Crowdus, together with all the 
rest of us, was anxious to have Sara there 
for the occasion. "The Sage of Franklin," who 
had intended bestowing a kiss on the lass as 
he presented her the trophy, could hardly do 
the same for Paul Kerrick — so a handshake 
had to do. 

University of Louisville's President, Phil 
Davidson, added a lot to the occasion in his 
capacity of principal speaker. The Dutchman 
had heard Phil before and knew that the 
K.H.S.A.A. had racked up another score in 
securing him. Phil knows how to be serious 
without taking himself too seriously — truly 
an accomplishment! 

For champion "Table-Hopper" of 1959 we 
must salute Oran Teater. "The Lil Abner 
of our Kentucky Mountains" bounced fi-om 
table to table at the banquet telling the fam- 
ous "Teater Jokes." Three different times, as 
funny stories came to his mind, he "hopped" 
to the speaker's table to pass them on — 
There's nothing "dead or stuffy" about 
K.H.S.A.A. dinners. 

Dayton High School gets the Abou Ben 
Adhem Award this month on the recommen- 
dation of Dick Hewling. Dick tells the Dutch- 
man that the sportsmanship of everybody in 
Dayton is a credit to Kentucky. Northern 
Kentucky is a great place to live. Ralph 
Mussman and Tom Ellis are there. 



About those Corn Cob Pipe Awards going 
to people rendering unselfish service! We 
have recommendations lined up far into next 
fall. The "Pipe" is fast becoming a Kentucky 
tradition. We hoped to get Jim Baker's 
nominee properly honored this month but 
Louisville's Claude Ricketts had priority. 

Claude, who is a transplant from Harlan, 
has done a remarkable job as rules inter- 
preter for the Falls Cities Officials Associa- 
tion. He has traveled hundreds of miles to 
serve groups in the Falls Cities area, and is 
one of the finest public relations men any 
organization could wish for. Claude's a great 
guy and a worthy winner of the Corn Cob 
Pipe of Honor Award. 

The Dutchman was the speaker at the 
Falls Cities Officials Association banquet this 
year. It is unusual and impressive. A fine 
job of friendship building is done at the 
banquets of this association and that of the 
Louisville Basketball Officials Association. 

These associations bring in high school 
coaches from a radius of one hundred miles, 
treat them to a fine evening of food and fun. 
You see fellowship prevail and old animosities 
vanish as coaches and officials really enjoy 
each other's company. 

The Dutchman has always upheld the in- 
tegrity and honesty of sports officials and 
coaches, but he is still looking for the "crook" 
who "made off" with his humidor of cigars, 
a gift to the gentlemen at the Speakers' Table 
by a local tobacco company. New Albany's 
Coach John Givens was on my left and Of- 
ficial Kenny Arnold of Fern Creek was on my 
right. It is a cinch that one of these charac- 
ters is smoking quarter cigars right now. 
Kenny Arnold is the new president of the 
Falls Cities Officials Association. 

In last month's column the Dutchman over- 
looked honoring Shelby Winfrey's nominee 
for the Corn Cob Pipe Award. The gentleman 
is Perryville's Garland Purdom. Garland's 
Kentucky thoroughbred, with the pipe adorn- 
ing its neck, is now among his trophies. His 
award was for service far beyond the call of 
duty. 

As the Dutchman signs "Thirty" to his 
last column of this school year his apprecia- 
tion and thanks go out all over Kentucky to 
the Kentuckians who make the K.H.S.A.A. 
sports program great. Your friendship has 
made The Flying Dutchman a happy man, 
truly rich in fine fellowship. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1959 



Page Seven 



1958-59 ANNUAL REPORT 

(Presented to Delegate Assembly) 

Four hundred fifty-three schools joined 
the Association during 1958-59. This is nine 
less than were enrolled in 1957-58. One 
hundred forty-four schools had eleven-man 
football teams, and thirteen played eight- 
man fotball. This is an increase of five 
eleven-man teams over 1957-58. The eight- 
man teams took the place of the former six- 
man teams. 

Financial reports filed by the sixteen reg- 
ional basketball tournament managers show 
total receipts of $116,980.05, an increase of 
some $7,000 over comparable figures for the 
preceding season. Receipts from the sixty- 
four district basketball tournaments amount- 
ed to $201,418.91, a decrease of approximate- 
ly $8,000 from the 1957-58 receipts. Receipts 
from ticket sales at the State Basketball 
Tournament will exceed $108,000.00, and ad- 
ditional receipts from the tournament pro- 
gram will bring total tournament receipts to 
approximately $111,000.00. Profit to the As- 
sociation on the tournament should approxi- 
mate $82,000.00. A few tournament bills are 
still being received by the State Office, with 
the result that it is necessary to give an esti- 
mate of tournament profits at this time. 
A complete record of all receipts and dis- 
bursements will appear in a subsequent issue 
of the Association magazine. 

One thousand one hundred ninety-seven 
basketball officials and 373 football officials 
registered with the Association in 1958-59. 
Nine football rules clinics were held under 
the direction of Edgar McNabb, and twenty- 
five football officials took the National Feder- 
ation examination for the higher ratings. Of 
this number, four were added to the "certi- 
fied" list, and eleven to the "approved" list. 
Charlie Vettiner, veteran trainer of officials, 
conducted fifteen basketball clinics, and held 
the School for Basketball Officials. Addition- 
al meetings and clinics were held by the reg- 
ional representatives who continue to render 
a fine service to the officials and schools in 
their respective areas. Ninety-four officials 
took the National Federation basketball ex- 
amination, with sixteen being added to the 
"certified" list and thirty-eight receiving the 
"approved" rating. 

Three hundred twenty-six schools insured 
their athletes under the K.H.S.A.A. Protec- 
tion Fund this year. Four thousand six hun- 



dred seventy-two boys were insured in foot- 
ball; 6,597 in physical education and all 
sports except football. One thousand eighteen 
claims, amounting to $25,723.52, have been 
paid to date. The Board of Control for 1958- 
59 gave each member school insuring its ath- 
letes in the Protection Fund a credit of 
$30.00. To date this free insurance has cost 
the Association $13,000, this amount having 
been transferred from the General Fund to 
the Protection Fund. 

Three schools have been suspended from 
the Association this year, and two have been 
placed on probation. One of the suspensions 
and both probations came as a result of the 
violation of K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 17, Practice 
of Sportsmanship. One school was suspend- 
ed for violation of By-Law 1, Section 7-a and 
7-b, Certification of Ineligible Player. One 
school was suspended for violation of By-Law 
5, Section 3, Deadline for Enrollment. 

Interest in minor and spring sports con- 
tinues high. Regional cross country runs 
were held in Paducah, Bowling Green, Louis- 
ville, Bellevue, Berea and Morehead on Nov- 
ember 1 for the purpose of qualifying teams 
and individuals for the state event, which 
was held in Lexington on November 15. 
Eight schools sent entries to the Class A Sec- 
tion of the State Swimming Meet, held in 
Lexington on February 28. Eleven schools 
sent entries to the Class B Section and three 
to the Class C Section of the State Swimming 
Meet, both of which were held in Lexington 
on April 4. One hundred seventy-seven mem- 
ber schools have indicated that they will 
send teams to the twelve regional track 
meets. This is a new high. Fifty-one district 
tournaments have been set up for baseball, 
to accommodate the 309 teams which will en- 
ter these tournaments. Seventy schools will 
have golf teams this spring, and these teams 
will enter eight regional tournaments to 
qualify for the State Golf Tournament. Fifty 
tennis teams will be entered in five regional 
tennis tournaments. 

1958-59 has been another good year for 
the Association. Although the receipts and 
attendance at the State Basketball Tourna- 
ment were down slightly from 1958, the 
finances of the Association continue to re- 
main in excellent condition because of the 
Tournament profits. The Board of Control 
and the Commissioner appreciate very much 
the cooperation of school representatives who 
have assisted with the program of the As- 
sociation. 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1959 



Baseball Rulings 



Editor's Note 
any rule. They ai 
situations which 



These rulings do not 
interpretations on sonn 
ve been presented. 



1. Play: With two out and Rl on 3rd and 
R2 on 1st, B5 hits safely down left field foul 
line but in advancing misses 1st base. Rl 
and R2 cross home base. B5 is thrown out at 
3rd. Basemen, shortstop and catcher leave 
the diamond, (a) Before; or (b) after leaving 
the diamond, the pitcher secures the ball and 
appeals at 1st base. 

Ruling: In (a), the appeal is granted and 
B5 is declared out at 1st. No runs are scored. 
In (b), the appeal is denied. The half -inning 
is considered ended when all infielders in- 
cluding the catcher and pitcher have moved 
off the diamond. 

2. Play: Coach of team in field calls time 
and confers with F6. Later during the same 
inning, coach confers with: (a) pitcher Fl ; 
or (b) relief pitcher FIO. 

Ruling: In both (a) and (b), pitcher must 
be removed from the game. 

3. Play : During the first inning coach calls 
time to confer with pitcher. Later during 
inning, F6 collides with F7, who is injured, 
and coach or attendant comes on the field to 
examine him. 

Ruling: Second conference is not charged 
because it is justified by an obvious injury. 

4. Play : Coach has called time once during 
each of the 4th and 5th innings to confer 
with his team which is in the field. In the 6th 
inning he calls time and withdraws the 
pitcher. In the 7th inning he calls time and 
confers with Fl or F5. 

Ruling: It is not necessary that the pitcher 
be withdrawn in the 7th inning. Any sub- 
sequent conference will require the removal 
of the pitcher. Each conference in the 4th 
and 5th inning was charged. Because the 
pitcher was removed, the conference in the 
6th inning was not charged. 

5. Play: Coach confers with team in the 
field after he or F6 is granted time, (a) 
Pitcher is withdrawn; or (b) pitcher and 
outfielder change places. 

Ruling: In (b), the conference is charged 
but in (a) it is not. 

6. Play: Bl appears at bat without head 
protector. 

Ruling: Umpire should order him to wear 
one. After warning failure of Bl to do so 
results in his being declared out. The pro- 
tector should be a type which has safety 
features equal to or greater than those pro- 
vided by the full plastic cap with padding 
on the inside. 



Note: State Associations are encouraged 
to experiment with the batter being declared 
out without warning if he appears in batter's 
box without a head protector. It is also 
recommended base rumiers be required to 
wear head protectors. 

7. Play: Fl stretches and comes to stop 
with Rl on 2nd. Fl then steps toward 3rd 
and: (a) fakes a throw; or (b) throws there 
in an attempt to put R out. 

Ruling: Legal in both (a) and (b) provid- 
ed Fl had not started to deliver to the batter 
after his stretch and stop. 

8. Play : As Fl winds up, Rl advances home 
and is hit by the pitch. 

Ruling: Ball becomes dead. Pitch is a ball 
or strike. If it is the 3rd strike, batter is out. 
Run scores unless it is the 3rd out. 

9. Play: From set position, Fl pitches with 
only the toe of his pivot foot in contact with 
the end of the pitcher's plate. 

Ruling: If there are no runners on base, 
it is an illegal pitch. If there are base run- 
ners, it is a balk. 

10. Play: A pitch starts with Rl on 3rd 
and R2 on 1st. R2 goes with the pitch so 
that he reaches 2nd before the catcher's 
overthrow in an attempt to pick Rl off 3rd 
into the stands. 

Ruling: Rl is awarded home base. The 
award to R2 is two bases from 1st which he 
occupied at the time of the pitch. 

11. Play: With Rl on 1st, B2 hits safely to 
outfielder F8 in short center field and Rl 
reaches 2nd before F8 throws. As B2 rounds 
1st, he draws a throw from F8 who over- 
throws 1st and the ball becomes dead in the 
stands. 

Ruling: Rl is awarded home base and B2 
is awarded 3rd. 

12. Play: With Rl on 2nd and R2 on 1st, 
F5 throws his glove against: (a) batted fair 
ball ; or (b) foul ball that would not have 
become fair. 

Ruling: In (a) Rl and R2 are awarded 
three bases, i.e., home, and B3 is awarded 3rd. 
In (b), there is no penalty. 

13. Play: With two out and Rl on 1st, 
3rd strike is muffed by F2. After Rl reaches 
2nd and B4 reaches 1st, F2 overthrows 1st 
base into stands. 

Ruling: Each runner is awarded two bases 
from the base occupied at the time of the 
pitch, that is, Rl will be awarded 3rd and 
B4 will go to 2nd. 

14. Play: With Rl on 1st, the hit and run 
play is signaled and Rl reaches 2nd before 
the catcher touches the pitch. The pitch: (a) 
becomes a passed ball which goes into the 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1959 



Page Nine 



stands; or (b) is muffed by F2 who, in at- 
tempting to prevent Rl from advancing 
further, overthrows 3rd into the stands. 

Ruling: In (a), Rl is awarded 2nd and in 
(b), Rl is awarded 3rd base. 

15. Play: R2, on 2nd, fails to tag up on 
caught fly and he advances to 8rd. After Fl 
delivers to plate, F4 calls for the ball and 
appeals at 2nd. 

Ruling: Appeal denied. Penalty is ignored 
if the appeal is not made before the succeed- 
ing pitch. 

16. Play: With: (a) no base runner; or (b) 
Rl on 1st, F2 has one or both feet outside the 
catcher's box when ball leaves hand of Fl on 
pitch. 

Ruling: In (a), the pitch is an illegal pitch 
and is called a ball even if it goes through 
the strike zone unless the batter advances 
at least one base because of safe hit or error 
or other reason. In (b), unless the batter 
and Rl each advance one base or more, it is 
a balk and the ball becomes dead as soon as 
the balk occurs. It is then neither a ball nor 
a strike but Rl is awarded 2nd. 

17. Play: With: (a) one out, or (b) two 
out, Rl on 3rd starts home. Fl, who is defin- 
itely not in pitching position throws to F2 
at the plate. Batter interferes with catcher's 
attempt to retire runner. 

Ruling: Rl is out in (a). The batter is out 
in (b). 



Basketball Rules Revisions 
For the Season of 1959-60 

1-12 : The first sentence will authorize the 
use of an orange-colored ball of an approved 
shade if there is mutual agreement. 

3-4: A third question and answer will be 
added to explain that shirt numbers may 
legally have a border or piping. The Com- 
mittee recommends that the border of a 
number be no wider than 1/4 inch. 

4-8 : The definition of a free throw will be 
slightly reworded by substituting the word 
"try" for "throw" in several places in the 
section. The revision is made to make it clear 
that bouncing the ball on the floor (as in 
a dribble) does not constitute a free try 
which ended when the ball touched the floor. 
There is no change in interpretation of this 
section because of the revision. 

4-10: The word "and" will be added to 
item (a) to make it definite that the 5-sec- 
ond count is to continue while the ball is 
held and/or dribbled when in control of the 
same player. 

5-2-2-Note: A slight revision of the word- 



ing will indicate clearly that for the purposes 
of correcting an error, the first live ball be- 
gins after the try has ended. 

5-7: These two questions will be added to 
follow this section to clarify situations which 
occur frequently in games played under the 
sudden end provision. Ques. (2) — At the end 
of the first extra period of a game played in 
quarters, the score is tied. During the sec- 
ond extra period, two free throws are scored 
by team A. Is the game over? Ans. — Yes. 
The game ended as soon as team A scored 
two points. 

Ques. (3) — During the second extra period 
in a game played in quarters, each team has 
scored one point. The team scores a free 
throw after one minute of the third extra 
period. Is the game over? Ans. — Yes. 

5-10-b and Ques. : 9-1-Pen. : There will be 
slight change in wording of these sections 
so that they correlate with the definition of 
a free throw. 

7-6 : The answer to item (c) of the question 
following Section 6 will indicate that it is a 
legal goal for the team in whose basket the 
ball remains or through which it passes. 

9-2-Note and Correlating items: Comment 
on Rules : The word "incidental" will be used 
to replace "accidental" and "negligible" for 
describing contact which is casual, not de- 
signed and by which no player is placed at 
a disadvantage. 

9-4: The section will be expanded so that 
it will be a violation if the ball is caused to 
enter and pass through the basket from be- 
low. 

9-9-Exception : The revision will provide 
that after a jump ball in the center circle, 
only the first player who controls the tapped 
ball may cause it to go to his back court and 
this must be prior to any loss of player con- 
trol by him, and providing it is the first time 
the ball is in the back court following the 
jump. 

10-7-Ques. (1) : The answer will be ex- 
panded to make it clear that for a guard to 
establish a guarding position, it is necessary 
for him to have his feet on the floor. 

Comments — Lack of Sufficient Action: 
This coverage will be slightly revised to pro- 
vide that each team shall be warned once 
during a given perior before it is penalized 
for insufficient action. 

Comments on the Rules: For the basis of 
making decisions resulting from personal 
contact and applying judgment, several para- 
graphs of the comments will be reworded. 
The revision will be made for the purpose 
of clarification rather than a change from 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1959 



previously accepted interpretations. The list- 
ing and explanation of basic principles will 
be followed by statements authorized by the 
Committee which are to be used as a basis 
for judgment in case of contact when there 
is: Screen play, Switching, Guarding the 
Dribbler, Guarding the Player with the Ball, 
Post Play, Rebounding and Receiving a Pass- 
out on a Fast Break. These various activities 
are categorized and principles on which to 
base judgment will be presented as a guide 
for the purpose of obtaining a more uniform 
and consistent administration and to develop 
play with less illegal action and fewer fouls. 
— Clifford B. Fagan, Secretary 
National Basketball Committee 



ANNUAL MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 

0. J. Mitchell moved, seconded by Herbert 
Hatfield, that Proposal VHI, providing that 
a senior contestant becoming twenty years 
of age on the opening day or during a dis- 
trict, regional, or state tournament in any 
sport shall be eligible as long as his team is 
in tournament competition, be tabled. The 
motion was carried. 

John Heber moved, seconded by Oran 
Teater, that Proposal IX, providing that dis- 
trict basketball tournaments may be played 
only in gymnasiums having a playing court 
50 X 84 feet, be tabled. The motion was 
carried. 

Joe Ohr moved, seconded by H. 0. Hale, 
that Proposal X, providing that the Board 
of Control be increased in number from eight 
to sixteen members, be tabled. The motion 
was carried. 

Thomas Brantley moved, seconded by 
Clovis W. Wallis, that Proposal XI, providing 
that 75 per cent of the over-all profits of 
the K.H.S.A.A. for any fiscal year should be 
divided equally among the member schools, 
be adopted. Raymond Combs moved, second- 
ed by Fred Reece, that the motion be tabled. 
The motion was carried. 

James A. Pursifull moved, seconded by 
Herbert Hatfield, that Proposal XII, provid- 
ing that the Commissioner shall be elected 
by the vote of K.H.S.A.A. member school 
principals, be tabled. The motion was carried. 

0. J. Mitchell moved, seconded by Andrew 
Renick, that Proposal XIII, providing for a 
new article in the Constitution, Responsibil- 
ity of the Principal, be adopted. Pete Grigsby 
moved, seconded by Amos Black, that the mo- 
tion be tabled. The tabling motion failed to 
carry. A vote was then taken on the original 



motion, and this carried by more than the 
necessary two-thirds majority. 

Brother Kirby moved, seconded by Andrew 
Renick, that Proposal XIV, providing for 
semi-final track meets to be held between 
the regional meets and the state meet, be 
tabled. The motion was carried. 

Joe Ohr asked the permission of the Dele- 
gate Assembly to submit a proposal concern- 
ing a change in Tournament Rule VI. Ken- 
neth Kuhnert moved, seconded by Pete 
Grigsby, that Mr. Ohr be allowed to submit 
his proposal. This motion was carried by 
more than the necessary two-thirds vote. Joe 
Ohr proposed that $500.00 be substituted for 
$300.00 in Tournament Rule VI-B-2. Herbert 
Hatfield moved, seconded by Jack Miller, 
that the proposal be tabled. The tabling mo- 
tion failed to carry. Oran Teater moved, 
seconded by Jack Miller, that the proposal be 
adopted. The motion was carried. 

Joe Gilly asked the permission of the Dele- 
gate Assembly to submit a proposal concern- 
ing an amendment to By-Law 21, Number of 
Basketball Games. James A. Pursifull moved, 
seconded by L. L. McGinnis, that Mr. Gilly 
be allowed to submit his proposal. This mo- 
tion was carried by more than the necessary 
two-thirds vote. Joe Gilly proposed that the 
final sentence of By-Law 21 be changed to 
read as follows: "In two county, conference, 
or invitational tournaments., the games 
played may be counted as two games." James 
A. Pui'sifull moved, seconded by A. R. 
Rochelle, that the motion be tabled. The 
tabling motion failed to carry. The vote was 
then taken on the original motion. The vote 
in favor of the motion was 35-22, but this 
was not the necessary two-thirds, and Presi- 
dent Williamson declared that the proposal 
had not been adopted. 

There being no further business, President 
Williamson declared the meeting adjourned. 

The dinner meeting of the Association was 
held in the Crystal Ballroom of the Brown 
Hotel at 6:00 P. M., with approximately 500 
delegates and other school officials present. 
Charlie Vettiner, the Flying Dutchman, an- 
nounced that there would be two recipients 
of the Game Guy Award this year, Fred Ra- 
dar of the Hazel Green High School and Sara 
Marcum of the Elizabethtown High School. 
Director W. B. Jones presented the award to 
Fred Radar with appropriate remarks. Miss 
Marcum had found it impossible to attend the 
meeting, and Director W. H. Crowdus pre- 
sented her award to Principal Paul E. Ker- 
rick of Elizabethtown. He mentioned the 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1959 



Page Eleven 



handicaps which Miss Marcum had overcome 
and her efforts to take part in sports. 

Dr. Philip Davidson, President of the Uni- 
versity of Louisville, gave the address of the 
evening. The subject of his talk was 
"Academics and Athletics." His message was 
well receiveu by all who attended the meet- 
ing. 



K. H. S. C. A. Meetings 

Executive Committee Meeting 
Held in Louisville, December 6, 1958 

The December 1958 meeting- of the Executive 
Commibtee of the Kentucky High School Coaches 
Association met at the Watterson Hotel in Louis- 
ville with the following officers present: Ollie 
Leathers, President; John Hackett, Vice President; 
and John Meihaus, Sergeant-at-Arms. 

John Meihaus moved, seconded by John Hackett, 
that each outgoing President of the K.H.S.C.A. be 
given the same award as the All-Star Coaches. The 
motion was carried. 

John Meihaus moved, seconded by Ollie Leathers, 
that the All-Star manager be presented the same 
award as the All-Star Coaches. The motion was 
carried. 

John Meihaus moved, seconded by Ollie Leath- 
ers, that the All-Star head coach be allowed a 
maximum of fifteen dollars ($15.00) to use for ex- 
penses of call meetings with assistant coaches. 

It was also agreed that there could not be any 
practice session of any kind on the field until Mon- 
day morning of the game week. 

It was also agreed that members of the All- 
Star squad are to report in Lexington by 4:00 C.S.T. 
instead of 1:30 C.S.T. 

There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned. 

Executive Committee Meeting 

Held in Lexington, March 21, 1959 

The Executive Committee of the Kentucky High 
School Coaches Association met March 21, 1959, at 
the Kentuckian Hotel in Lexington with the follow- 
ing members present: Ollie Leathers, President; 
John Hackett, Vice President; Joe Ohr, Secretary- 
Treasurer; and Eck Branham, Manager. 

Coaches for the 1959 All-Star Basketball Game, 
who were chosen by fellow coaches of Kentucky, 
were also present. Attending the meeting were: 
Paul Coop, Campbellsville, Head Coach for the West; 
and Tom Ellis, Covington, Head Coach for the East. 
Each coach was furnished with a list of the players 
for this year's team. 

Assistants Charles Lampley, North Marshall, 
and Jack Fultz, Olive Hill, were not present because 
they had teams in the State Tournament. 

It was agreed that the teams report August 9, 
at the Coliseum in Lexington, at 4:00 o'clock, the 
later time being a change from the previous time, 
1:30. 

It was also agreed that April 15 was to be the 
deadline for players accepting or rejecting their 
positions in the 1959 All-Star game. 

Plans were made for a meeting of the Execu- 
tive Committee during the Kentucky Education As- 
sociation, at the Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, April 
15, at 4:00 o'clock. 

There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned. 



Executive Committee Meeting 
Held in Louisville, April 15, 1959 

The Executive Committee of the Kentucky High 
School Coaches Association met at the Watterson 
Hotel in Louisville on April 15, 1959. The following 
members were presei.it: Ollie Leathers, President; 
Joe Ohr, Secretary-Treasurer; Estill Branham, 
Game Manag'er; and Theo. A. Sanford, Commis- 
sioner. 

There was a general discussion on having a 
student ticket for the All-Star Game. It was agreed 
to maintain the regular $1.25 admission price. 

It was discussed that a change be made in the 
date for the submission of ballots for "Coach of 
the Year" in basketball and the naming of All-Star 
players. It was agreed that the dates be kept as 
now provided in the rules of the K.H.S.C.A., but 
that ballots must be in by the first Mo'.nday follow- 
ing the Disti-ict Tournament. 



Annual Business Meeting 

Held in Louisville, April 15, 1959 

The regular meeting of the Kentucky High 
School Coaches Association met April 15, 1959, in 
the Ship Room of the Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, 
Kentucky, with sixty-five members present. 

The meeting- was called to order at 7:30 p.m. 
by retiring President Ollie Leathers, who was act- 
ing in the absence of President John Hackett. Vis- 
itors to the meeting were Theo. A. Sanford, Commis- 
sioner of the Kentucky High School Athletic As- 
sociation, and Russell Williamson, Jack Dawson, and 
Bob Forsythe, representing the Board of Control. 

Ralph McRight moved, seconded by Fred Reece, 
that the reading of the minutes be dispensed with, 
since they had been published in the ATHLETE, the 
official publication of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association. The motion was carried. 

Secretary-Treasurer Joe Ohr made a complete 
financial report of the three funds: The Savings 
Account fund, the All-Star fund, and the Kentucky 
High School Coaches Association fund. Fred Reece 
moved, seconded by Tom Ellis, that the financial 
reports be accepted. The motion was carried. 

President Leathers appointed an Auditing Com- 
mittee composed of Guy Strong, Jim Ownby, and 
Bill Hogg. 

The minutes of the Executive Meetings were 
read and approved. 

Officers for 1959-60 were announced, these 
having been elected at the reg-ular meeting in 1958. 

New officers were elected for 1960-61. Fred 
Reece nominated Jos Ohr for Secretary-Treasurer. 
The nomination was seconded by Bob Miller. Ralph 
McRight moved that nominations cease. Joe Ohr 
was elected Secretary-Treasurer by acclamation. 
Bill Warren nominated James Ownby and John 
Meihaus nominated Charles Kuhn for Sergeant at 
Arms. N. L. Passmore moved that the nominations 
cease. Tomi Ellis seconded the motion. James O'vm- 
by was elected Sergeant at Arms. 

Coach of the Year in Football 1958, Jim Pickens 
of Danville, and Coach of the Year in Basketball 
1959, Paul Coop of Campbellsville, were recognized. 
Coach Coop, who was in Washington, D. C. with 
seniors, was unable to attend. Pickens was presented 
with a g-old football by Ollie Leathers, representing- 
the Kentucky High School Coaches Association and 
the Central Kentucky Conference. 

Bernard "Peck" Hickman, University of Louis- 
ville basketball coach, spoke to the members on 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1959 



"Athletics and Scholarship." Hickman was intro- 
duced by acting- President Leathers. 

Earl Cox was recogmized for his fine articles 
in the Courier Journal. 

A vote of the members authorized the Secre- 
tary-Treasurer to vote on the proposals at the 
Delegate Assembly. 

A committee composed of Guy Strong, Charlie 
Kuhn, John Meihaus, and Jeep Quire was appointed 
to study and offer a proposal to the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association that the president of 
the Kentucky High School Coaches Association be 
placed on tlie Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association. 

A proposal was made by Tom Ellis to increase 
the tournament expense from $300 to $500. The 
proposal was accepted by the members. Joe Ohr 
was authorized to present this proposal to the 
Delegate Assembly at Thursd'ay's meeting. 

There being no funther business, the meeting- 
adjourned at 9:30 P. M. 



Ky. Coaches Association 

April 14, 1959 
Executive Committee 

Kentucky High School Coaches Association 
Louisville, Kentucky 
Gentlemen: 

In accordance with instructions from your Sec- 
retary, Mr. Joe Ohr, I have made an examination of 
the records of your organization that were sub- 
mitted to me by Mr. Ohr for the period April 1, 
1958, thru March 3, 1959. 

The results of the various transactions during 
this period ai-e shown on the accompanying Schedule 
of Cash Receipts and Disbursements. The balance in 
the bank of $4,824.97 has been confirmed as being 
on deposit in the Union Bank & Trust Company, 
Irvine, Kentucky, as of March 3, 1959. 

All receipts and disbursements as shown in the 
accompanyi-ng schedule appear to be cori-ectly re- 
corded and are properly substantiated by cancelled 
checks. 

In my opinion the schedule properly reflects the 
cash receipts and disbursements as recorded for 
the period shown, and all records are in neat and 
orderly fashion. 

Respectfully submitted, 
William Sexton, Jr., Auditor 
National Bookkeeping Service 
KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL COACHES ASSOCIA- 
TION, STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND 
DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE PERIOD APRIL 
1. 1958, THROUGH MARCH 3. 1959. 
RECEIPTS: 

Total Receipts $ 1.3.39.50 

Plus: Bank Balance March 11, 1958 4.529.83 

TOTAL $ 5,869.33 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Postage S 3.00 

Delegate Expense to K.E.A. 25.00 

Membership Collection Expense 399.50 

Coach of Year Awards 73.40 

Audit of Books 16.82 

Treasurers Bond 31.25 

Renewal of Charter I.OO 

All-Star Headquarters Expense 128.49 

Expenses and Refunds - Joe Ohr 30.38 

Printing Membership Cards 18.50 

Expenses to National Rules Meeting 317.02 

Total Disbursements $ 1.044.36 

Excess of Receipts over Disbursements $ 4.824.97 

Balance in Bank on March 3. 1959 $ 4.824.97 

(Union Bank & Trust Company, Irvine, Kentucky) 



April 14, 1959 
Executive Committee, East-West All Star 
Football and Basketball Games of Kentucky 
Hig-h School Coaches Association, 
Louisville, Kentucky 
Gentlemen: 

In compliance with instructions from your Sec- 
retary, Mr. Joe Ohr, I have examined the records 
of your organization submitted to me by Mr. Ohr 
for the period April 1, 1958 through April 1, 1959. 

The results of the transactions during the period 
are shown in the attached Schedule of Cash Re- 
ceipts and Disbursements. The balance of $12,705.56 
in the All-Star Account has been confirmed as being 
on deposit in the First National Baink & Ti-ust 
Company, Lexington, Kentucky. 

The records disclose total receipts from the 
All-Star Games ticket sales as being $7,281.25 after 
expenses of ticket sellers and other expenses. Re- 
ceipts from the sale of programs amounted to 
$637.10, added to $7,281.25 giving Mr. Ohr a net 
deposit of $7,918.35. The expenses mentioned herein 
are properly covered by cash receipts. 

The total cash receipts of $7,918.35 agrees in 
amount with the deposits made in the First National 
Bank & Trust Company, Lexington, Kentucky. 

All receipts and disbursements as shown in 
the accompanying schedule appear to be correct 
and in my opinion this schedule presents correctly 
the cash receipts and disbursements on the All-Star 
Fund account for the period above stated and your 
Secretary is to be complimented on the fine manner 
in which these records are kept. 

In addition to the above balance, I have con- 
firmed a balance of $3,604.44 in KENTUCKY HIGH 
SCHOOL COACHES ASSOCIATION SAVINGS 
ACCOUNT NO. 9315 in the Columbia Federal Sav- 
ings & Loan Association, Covington, Kentucky. This 
balance is as of April 1, 1959, and the increase in 
this balance is the 1958 dividend of $122.89. 
Respectfully submitted, 
William Sexton, Jr., Auditor 
National Bookkeeping Service 

EAST-WEST ALL-STAR FOOTBALL AND 
BASKETBALL GAMES OF THE KENTUCKY 
HIGH SCHOOL COACHES ASSOCIATION. 
STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DIS- 
BURSEMENTS FOR THE PERIOD FROM 
APRIL 1, 1958 THROUGH APRIL 1, 1959. 

RECEIPTS: 

Receipts from All-Star Games $ 7,281.25 

Receipts from All-Star Programs 637.10 

Total Receipts $ 7,918.35 

Plus: Bank Balance April 1, 1958 11,716.54 

TOTAL $19,634.89 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Change for All-Star Games $ 600.00 

Awards for All-Star Players 1,426.50 

Medical Bills for Plavers - 1956 475.60 

Photos 65.00 

Printing 260.52 

Manager & Coaches Salaries 1,900.00 

Traveling Expenses - Players 962.71 

Insurance 383.00 

Misc. Travel, Postage and Telephone 174.33 

State Deposit Tax 13.54 

Federal Tax on All-Star Games 668.13 

Total Disbursements $ 6,929.33 

BALANCE $12,705.56 

Balance in Bank on April 1, 1959 $12,705.56 

(First National Bank & Trust Co., Leiington, Ky.) 



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